10

It won't work. You can melt hot glue in a pan, but it tends to turn yellow and eventually brown if it gets too hot. whether the mold survives the pouring depends on the material. The real problem is that hot glue shrinks quite a lot while cooling down. The mold surface is cooler than the hot glue, so it sets at the outside first, while the center stays ...


6

A few comments about the problem as a whole, before I address your specific question... You are attempting to encapsulate something in a clear resin shell. That shell lacks any distinct shape, being comprised of flat planes and soft organic curves. It does not contain any sharply detailed features or surface textures. In short, the shell probably does ...


4

According to Wikipedia, resin is: In polymer chemistry and materials science, resin is a solid or highly viscous substance of plant or synthetic origin that is typically convertible into polymers. Resins are usually mixtures of organic compounds. This article focuses on naturally-occurring resins. The article references plants which secrete resin ...


4

How about making the final project mask directly from papier-mache without all the casting: Cover the skull in clingfilm to protect it; Papier-mache parts of it (if you try to do it in one go you won't be able to take the thing out, naturally); Glue the parts together; Alter it as you desire - cut some bits here, add some bits there, sand it; Paint it, if ...


4

You can use food grade silicon for casting as well as for making molds. What you need to look for is chocolate casting silicon. They are pretty expensive and there are plenty of manufacturers, but you need to follow the directions very carefully. In Europe I have had good experience with a product called schokomold If you do cast silicon in a silicon mold,...


4

For use with the widest range of metals, a properly prepared ceramic mold is your best bet. It can tolerate high temperatures and capture fine details well. However, these are commonly single-use molds that are broken to remove the cast object. Rather than trying to find a "silver bullet," you're better off targeting your specific needs for each case. If ...


3

Injection molding can in fact be done at home. But judging from the OP this method would be far and above beyond the scope of his current knowledge on these types of things. The easiest way to cast plastic parts at home or in your workspace if that’s the case would be with the use of a commercially available product such as SmoothOn. Simple. Sold on ...


3

Sounds like you're looking for a mold release agent. Some examples of release agents are: Pam Cooking Spray Olive Oil applied with a spray pump Industrial Mold Release Agents such as McLube All of the above mold release agents are applied in the same manner. Starting with a clean mold, spray on a thin layer of the mold release agent into the mold, covering ...


2

I agree with the basic idea of what fred-dot-u mentioned, but I'd tweak the method a bit. Put your beads on a wire. Cut apart an old coat-hanger with snips and use that. This would give you a sprue through all the beads at once. Make sure the wire is the same length as the Tupperware that you're gonna use. This way your sprue goes all the way ...


2

If your objective is to create a silicone product, take a different viewpoint of your research thus far. Silicone molds work because silicone sticks to almost nothing other than silicone. If you create a mold using silicone as the foundation, pouring food materials inside means you get food materials out, without sticking. For your beads, consider that you ...


2

Depending on the material you will be casting in the mold, you may find that you can make use of a product called Hand Moldable Plastic. This product is shipped as small beads which are heated in boiling water per the instructions. I've used a hot air gun, which works faster and increases the chance of burning your fingers. Once the white beads are heated, ...


2

Would a two step process work? Make the first mold off of the fiberglass with latex rubber (or another molding rubber that is not anti-fiberglass) then make a plaster positive from that. So now you have the fiberglass form in plaster, use that for the silicone mold.


2

Traditionally cast iron was cast in sand, link to a Wikipedia page about casting in sand. And I have also seen other metals cast in sand, like pewter and silver. And as indicated in the comments on the question, other materials can be used as well. Like plaster, ceramic, and even some kind of rubber for pewter.


2

People have suggested many kinds of household materials that can be used for casting. If you really want a resin that looks, feels, and acts like plastic, there are a few options. PVA glue (common white glue) will dry to a soft plastic, but with tremendous shrinkage, and it will redissolve if it gets wet, and can turn cloudy from absorbing humidity. The ...


1

Food safe, moldable materials are rare in general. The closest thing that comes to my mind is a kind or "organic plastic" made from milk, but it looked hard to work with and I don't know how food safe that really is on the long run. Take for example a simple porcelain dish: the porcelain itself is porous and would stain with food residue. It's the glaze ...


1

Depending on what you need to obtain, and also depending on quantity, you might want to think of other materials. Note: some of the ideas below require you to have at least one of the following: special knowledge; special skill; special tools. Alternative materials: some kind of cement; silicone (colored, transparent...) plastic which can be thermally ...


1

Casting resins have very different characteristics, like: virtually no shrinkage no flowing once cured hardness stable color crystal clarity some don't put out much heat during cure, so they can be used in thin thermoplastic molds etc. There is a long list of differences, and hot glue basically sucks at those characteristics. If you need the ...


1

Before going farther, there are some plastics that can be safely melted at home with good ventilation as long as you use the right procedure (warm it slowly and don't exceed the temperature needed to melt it), and some plastics that give off toxic fumes when they melt, so you should never try to melt those indoors. Do your research. The question asks about ...


1

Most plastics can;t be cast easily in this way as they don't have a distinct liquid phase and even when 'melted' have very high viscosity. Generally thermo-softening plastics are formed under considerable pressure eg by injection moulding, extrusion of blow-moulding, or are formed from softened sheets as in vacuum forming. If you want to cast plastic parts ...


1

Let's go through this step by step. For your plaster outer portion (mold), I recommend at least 8 pieces (2 pieces if it is single-use and you can break it up, in which case make sure to use a soft plaster). And you are going to put a styrofoam of balloon center in it when you go to cast. Make a 2 piece blank (master) of your shape around a solid center ...


1

It looks like you could blow up a ballon to get the shape of the interior. Then glue hex shaped objects to the surface of the ballon in the pattern of the holes. Then build a wire framework over the tops of the hex shapes to hold them in position and to support your mold's outer shell. Finally apply that outer shell as a series of glued vinyl sheets or ...


1

If you're using a two-part pourable silicone, you can make a mold of the item with a reusable gelatin-glycerin mold material you can make at home. There are a lot of variations on the formula resulting in different characteristics. The material, itself, is also molded into special effects prosthetics instead of using latex rubber. To investigate the ...


1

I agree with #torjek that a separator (mold-release) spray or liquid would make it possible to caste a silicone object with silicone as the mold making material. The benefit of getting good at this technique is that you could then caste replacement silicone earplugs using the mold which you just made out of silicone. If you need more protection for your ...


1

Your technique should work, as long as the male is a fairly close negative of the female. If that's the case, then your first mould (of the female part) will be the correct shape for the male part, and can act as what's known as a master. If they're not exact negatives of each other (in your case, I expect the male connector to be slightly smaller than the ...


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