10

I think you'll enjoy trying what's called the "invisible decrease". By running through two stitches but not actually making the base of both of them, it tightens up the space and only shows a single stitch. It can actually be challenging to see where the decrease is after it's completed. From the linked article (there are images included for both right and ...


5

Yes, it's likely that an off-the-shelf glitter glue will give out, if it hardens at all in the wet environment. Glitter glue is a PVA glue, which tends to soften and dissolve when exposed to water; it's the same base as "washable school glue," and while different PVA glues have different solubilities, the base used in glitter glues is a highly soluble base ...


4

You will probably need medium and soft charcoal for creating smoothly blended surfaces (like her skin), and some hard charcoals or perhaps even a carbon pencil (which contains a mixture of charcoal and graphite) for the crisp textures of her armor and the fine lines of her hair. For blending, you may want to use a tortillion or a blending stump and a kneaded ...


4

Ugh, confetti stitches are the worst! Especially when it's not a full coverage piece like you're describing. But you have options :) The easiest starting option with an even number of threads is a "simple loop start". So instead of using two threads of colour, use one and fold it in half to make a loop at the end that you go through (on the back of ...


3

Use acrylic paint as an underpainting. It can be safely used in combination with gouache. To retain as much as possible of the character of a gouache painting (the matte look and texture), I suggest diluting it nevertheless, which, in addition, will help keep an eventual underdrawing visible and improves adhesion (based on the discussion here, it otherwise ...


3

For removing the stick pin backing, you need to remove the parts that stick out and file it down to be smooth. To remove, I'd use one of the following: a Dremel tool with appropriate bit if it looks like the badge was soldered, a soldering iron to un-solder it. (Make sure that the front of the badge won't be damaged by the heat, and follow safety ...


3

You can use a layered option. Frosted acrylic or polycarbonate tends to be expensive, so you can get a thin sheet of that, maybe 1/4" or 1/8", then get a clear support piece the same size but thicker as your base. You don't need to glue them together, or anything, just lay the frosted piece over the clear. In fact, I've done a fair bit of gluing/...


2

I've never used the stuff, but it has a reputation for sticking to everything. Have you tried a release agent? I'll offer some speculation on what should probably work (the first things I would try in your situation). If the shape of the object lends itself, wrap it with oven parchment paper. That's impregnated with silicone, takes high temperatures, and ...


2

Add a mesh/grid of thin tensioned horizontal wires below the sheet - your frame will need to be strong enough to resist the tension. Something like guitar wire, or perhaps clear fishing line will have minimal impact on the image projected - though do a test before committing.


2

The tripod grips are used mostly for drawing "lines", whether plain writing of text, or drawing contours. However, the overhand grip is used mostly for filling areas, e.g. backgrounds. This grip keeps the tip away from the drawing surface, allowing the side of the pencil (or drawing tool in general) to contact the paper. The result is a more ...


2

I think that @whrrgarbl has given you all of the correct steps for accomplishing this change. I just wanted to add a couple of additional comments regarding that answer: I think your best bet is bullet-point number 3. Use wire cutters or a jewelers saw to clip/saw the ends of the stick pin as close to the pin's rectangular base as you can. Then use a ...


2

I assume you need it to lie flat when open, and don't have access to a printer that will print double size pages (e.g. A3 if you normally use A4). If you do have such a printer it's easy - fold in half and use a long arm stapler or sewing machine in the crease. A comb binding machine would work well, giving you a book that lies nicely open. You can add, ...


2

I'm not a charcoal artist, so this is more in the nature of observation and very general theory. This question and your other one about drawing the scratches in the armor are about getting very fine and subtle texture, detail, and gradients using charcoal. Charcoal is a relatively "crude" medium; this kind of life-like detail takes skill. People ...


1

You can try the windshield repair resin to hold the loose chip. Citrine is a form of quartz, which is the primary component of normal glass, so a resin designed to match the refractive index of windshield glass might not be visible. I don't think it will work for an internal crack in a gemstone, though. The resin won't seep into the crack under normal ...


1

Here's a way to curve the rim on the rubber. Get a scrap wooden board big enough for each sole, and at least as thick as the depth of the curve. Cut out the shape of the sole. Put the desired curve around the edge (could use a router, but probably fast with just a sander). Make the finished form slightly smaller than the sole (by the thickness of the ...


1

Depending on the paper and pressure you apply to your pencil, when you use graphite over charcoal, you will just scratch away most of the charcoal powder. Fixating the charcoal first won't help much, since the charcoal particles are much larger, and this process will just mess up the drawing more. On the other hand, using charcoal over graphite won't work ...


1

You can use all embrodery technics as long as you realize that the back will be visible. Not just the back, the threads will be visible all along, but so do the knots and mistakes. It is likely best to keep your fabric in a hoop or stretched over a frame, so you will not draw it in while working. There are special stitches which are the same front and back. ...


1

You can use something thick and rigid enough to not noticeably sag (like glass or thick plastic). But you can also accomplish it with relatively thin material. The material will bend but needs to be stiff so as to not sag in random places. Giving it an intentional slight curve in one direction will prevent it from bending in the other direction. Make the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible