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10

A grit edged hacksaw blade (random example) would be the hand tool for the job. It would be a bit of a slow job but not unreasonable (given the rate these things go through tiles). I suggest making/modifying a jig based on a mitre box to go with it, if you want repeatable, straight cuts. The jig itself might be a bit tricky as it sounds like you want ...


9

Forward While this answer might seem long it is unfortunately not as in depth as I want. I have not cut any ceramics with the tools and techniques I am going to suggest. Given the desired end result I feel that this would be an approach to consider though. This might be difficult depending on your level of expected precision and tool availability I have a ...


6

epoxy seems like a reasonable choice Epoxies are really versatile and can give very strong results. It would have been the first thing I considered as well. since there are some gaps of around 1mm width Likely not an issue but most glues need perfectly mated surfaces for good adhesion. There are expanding glues, like Gorrila Glue, but most? epoxies are ...


6

Most 2 part epoxies are food safe once fully cured. You can see these used in kitchen applications like counter tops and bread boards. There are some that advertise as being food safe grade. Masterbond.com Reading the product labels both on the product itself and online will help. Some will even reference FDA compliance when it comes to food safety. If ...


6

What you want to do is to make paper clay. Basically, you shred toilet paper (cheaper the better) in warm water and use a paint mixer on your drill to make it into pulp. Then add the slip and beat again. Let sump for 24 hours, then place piles of it on slabs to dry. Wedge as usual, and get to work. This material will change the way you work with clay. It ...


5

I'm not a conservator, so I cannot give you a definite answer. And the answer will depend on the value of the object. If this is a rare remnant of history, do not attempt any restoration and let a professional restorator do their work. In that case, it would be almost illegal to apply epoxy to it, because the process isn't reversable. Most amateurs trying to ...


3

By epoxy I presume you mean Araldite etc. Do not use this, it has too much bulk and you will never get a good fit. Use superglue to stick it together to begin with, and then you can fill the gaps with a suitable filler. I have used Polyfiller, which then gets sanded, painted and varnished. I have tried and failed too many times to re-repair items done with ...


3

If the kiln is rated for 1950 degrees Fahrenheit, then that's about the highest you should fire it to. The number of rings you use isn't a function of how hot it gets but more a function of how much space the inside of the kiln will have. To test the kiln, you can just plug it in and turn it on, if it heats up, it works. As BrownRedHawk stated, you should ...


1

Food safe, moldable materials are rare in general. The closest thing that comes to my mind is a kind or "organic plastic" made from milk, but it looked hard to work with and I don't know how food safe that really is on the long run. Take for example a simple porcelain dish: the porcelain itself is porous and would stain with food residue. It's the glaze ...


1

With the first coat you should dissolve the crushed shellac flakes in denatured alcohol with a bit more shellac than usual, and stir in an emulsion of premixed marble dust, a touch of linseed oil and fresh egg yolk until you get the right consistency for painting. If it doesn’t dry fast enough for you, consider adding a few drops of saponifying ‘japan drier’...


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