6

No, it's not too hard. For the beginner, Basswood and Butternut woods are the easiest to carve. Don't be confused about the hardwood and softwood definitions as they aren't literal interpretations of the wood's hardness. One source for carving woods is Heinecke Wood Products - https://www.heineckewood.com/ The Sculpture Studio has a list of some of the ...


4

Depends on how deep the rust is. Rust weakens the bonds in the metal, but unless it is rusted right through, it's probably recoverable. Basically, you want to: Remove the rust, likely a soak in vinegar for a day or so will do the main job. Sand off any remaining rust using something like steel wool or fine grit sandpaper. Sharpen. Polish to restore finish. ...


4

Jigsaw is a poor choice of tool for this given the size of the finished product and that it is a roughing tool more designed for cutting sheet goods. Tools to consider Bandsaw If the polyhedron was a little larger and your valued the tolerance of the finished product I would most certainly suggest the bandsaw as you can use a mitre slide and a custom ...


4

The properties of the wood, especially its density will have a significant effect on the tone of the instrument but there is quite a wide variety used as well as various laminates. Of critical importance is the stability of the wood as even small amounts of warping can seriously affect play-ability, this is especially the case with the neck which needs to ...


3

Anyone with a large enough tree is a potential source -- but you might have to do some more work (square it up to make a blank & dry it to the appropriate humidity to work it) When my neighbor had a maple dropped that was about 5' across, someone came up and asked if they could have some of the wood to make a cello. He had said that the trick was to ...


3

Some thoughts. The big crack on the back looks like it might be amenable to replicating the adjacent area of the coils. Make a narrow silicone mold of the coils to the left of the crack. Then position the mold over the crack and seal it against the snake. It looks like you will also need to seal off the crack that extends into the base so resin doesn't ...


2

Usually you should let green wood dry for 2 years before carving objects out of them or using it to build something. Depending on the local climate, the size of the wood block (or tree) and how you dry it, the time may shorten to several months or extend to 5 years. Wood shrinks and warps as it dries. If you cut or carve it green, the size will be different ...


1

The knife is more common in Japanese printmaking. I unfortunately can't find any sources comparing the two, but I hypothesize that one reason gauges are more common in Western printmaking is due to the influence of wood engraving. Another reason might be the style differences - Japanese prints are much more likely to have strong clear lines and large blocks ...


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