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To prevent fraying, use a z-stitch (zig-zag stitch) with a standard sewing machine or serge the ends of the fabric before you wash it. I've recently read a lot of guides about washing fabric before sewing and, while they often disagree about whether washing is necessary or not - generally depending on the type of fabric and the end use, the one thing they ...


5

I'm revising this answer after further research. Considerations Neodymium magnets are made from an alloy of neodymium and other metals. The magnets are typically plated with nickel. Pure neodymium is very reactive, oxidizing quickly in air and reacting quickly with hot water (much slower in cold water). I don't know the extent to which the neodymium ...


5

I would hesitate to cut my fabric into smaller pieces for storage, just because I can pretty much guarantee that as soon as you cut your fabric, the universe will send you the perfect pattern for that particular piece of fabric--but the pattern will require about 1/2 yard longer than your chosen cutting length. But the reason I wanted to post an answer is ...


5

It is best to wash every fabric you use in the same method you would use to wash it after you use it. You don't want to spend time making something that shrinks to unusable proportions after cleaning it. If you never intend to wash it, don't bother. If your going to need to dry clean it dry-clean it first. If you are going to dry-clean it you should do ...


4

I wish I could test this personally but I do not have those pencils. Have you tried plastic or steel wire brushes? Image from Amazon The steel(metal in general) ones might remove too much material. This could largely depend on technique. So the plastic one might be effective but so much as to remove too much material. You can keep the pencil on the "table"...


4

I think it really depends on the fabric. If the manufacturer of the fabric states that it should be dry cleaned, that's probably a signal that they're serious about it. Silk and wool can often be hand-washed in very gentle shampoo as a way of pre-shrinking the fabric... but some fabrics simply don't tolerate washing well. They lose their look or shape when ...


3

The short answer is yes, you can. Longer answer is that there is a some uncertainty around using an acrylic gesso for oil, but it's clear that doing it right makes a real difference here. If you take the appropriate steps and properly prepare for oils, it should be fine. The Artist's Network has a really good article on the topic and the essentials really ...


3

Sounds like you're looking for a mold release agent. Some examples of release agents are: Pam Cooking Spray Olive Oil applied with a spray pump Industrial Mold Release Agents such as McLube All of the above mold release agents are applied in the same manner. Starting with a clean mold, spray on a thin layer of the mold release agent into the mold, covering ...


3

Don't cut your fabric until you know what you're making out of it. While it is possible to "piece" fabric when your pattern pieces are larger than your fabric, it's a pain in the neck, and the results are never as nice as an un-pieced garment. I know it can be nice to store your fabric pre-washed, so you can just grab what you need and start sewing, but it'...


2

I always use my cutting board wherever the cutting takes place: table, bed, floor. The boards have numerous markings on them and helps amazingly to keep things aligned. Nothing worse than having fabric go off-grain because the off-grain piece is generally unsalvageable for the project. (Could be used for something else though; scraps are always handy to have....


2

I was searching for the article that shows you how to wash bolts of fabric without fraying or getting all tangled up. It involved folding a certain way and then pinning the ends with safety pins. I did do it before and it worked really well but I can't find the article now. Recently when I just tried to guess what i did the first time, it worked out well. ...


2

You should keep your fabric in sizes that are at least at big as the "average" size for the type of garment you'll make out of it. Take a look at your patterns or browse a few online to get an idea of how much different projects take. If I'm buying fabric without a particular pattern in mind, my rule of thumb is: Tops: 1 - 2 yards (sleeveless top - long ...


1

Any bones which are obviously clean and free form any residual soft tissue shouldn't be too much of a problem. With skulls you obviously have more cavities to work about but if the outer surface is clean when you find it it is reasonable to amuse that the interior is too. Once the bones are cleaned of any soil etc a wash with dilute hydrogen peroxide ...


1

Sandpaper is the best way to go. The Art Stix are square, just lightly drag the side you want to use along a flat piece of sandpaper, medium fine grit (~200?) The sandpaper will clog up immediately if too fine. You can actually find little sandpaper blocks at art stores, they are called "Sandpaper Pencil Pointers" and should do the trick. They are a few ...


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