10

There are many different kinds of finishes that are food safe. It turns out most finishes once dried or cured are food safe to one level or another. Most finishes that cure are only food safe after they have finished curing which, sometimes can take quite a while, days, weeks, for some months. Many of the food oil finishes are very food safe, peanut and ...


6

Most 2 part epoxies are food safe once fully cured. You can see these used in kitchen applications like counter tops and bread boards. There are some that advertise as being food safe grade. Masterbond.com Reading the product labels both on the product itself and online will help. Some will even reference FDA compliance when it comes to food safety. If ...


5

You would use a hand held diamond file. They are sold specifically for the purpose you are describing (fixing chipped articles). There are a number of articles and videos online which detail the process and specify which files to use (flat, rounded, etc.).


5

Most waxes and oils are, in themselves, food safe in indeed may of them are in fact food ingredients. The complication is that products used for finishing may contain additives and solvents which are potentially toxic although solvents, which by their nature disappear once the finish is cured tend to be less of a issue than drying agents. The best advice ...


4

When turning wood, I use paraffin blocks to finish the projects. I hold a solid block against the turning piece and make sure that everything is coated. Then I take a clean cloth and buff the turning piece up. The only downside in my opinion is that it doesn't penetrated the wood very deep this way.


4

You can use food grade silicon for casting as well as for making molds. What you need to look for is chocolate casting silicon. They are pretty expensive and there are plenty of manufacturers, but you need to follow the directions very carefully. In Europe I have had good experience with a product called schokomold If you do cast silicon in a silicon mold,...


4

I've used a food grade silicone in the past that has the consistency of pudding. It is rather soft and very weak and would not hold up in the example you provide. I have used a more expensive silicone, also food grade that requires substantial mixing to get good results, often requiring vacuum degassing for smooth surfaces. In your example, I expect that ...


3

Operating with a two stage fill is a good start. Consider also that the dead space at the bottom need not be anything special, generally speaking. Cut cardboard, stuffed newspaper, just about anything at hand. Create your 1 and 2 shapes all in one step or in pieces, as you like. Once in place, seal the top surfaces of 1 and 2 with a flat component, perhaps ...


3

Per an email from Araldite customer service: None of our AralditeĀ® products carry food safety certifications (although there are several that would likely be safe for food contact). Best regards Lee On a request for a follow-up on specific formulations that might be safe in contact with hot water, they replied: You could probably use ...


3

Food coloring would be the easiest, most colorful and most common way of coloring eggs. Alternately and perhaps more traditionally there are a number of natural dyes that come from food stuffs: purple cabbage, red onions, yellow onions, beets, teas. Typically these are chopped and boiled in water with a little clear vinegar in it until the color goes into ...


2

You're not going to be able to adhere paper to any piece that will be kiln fired. Alternate options include adding those paper clippings to fired pieces and then sealing them with some kind of varnish coating, or creating stencils or screens for screen printing your text/designs. There are places that will create custom screens if this is your desire. As ...


2

I agree with the basic idea of what fred-dot-u mentioned, but I'd tweak the method a bit. Put your beads on a wire. Cut apart an old coat-hanger with snips and use that. This would give you a sprue through all the beads at once. Make sure the wire is the same length as the Tupperware that you're gonna use. This way your sprue goes all the way ...


2

If your objective is to create a silicone product, take a different viewpoint of your research thus far. Silicone molds work because silicone sticks to almost nothing other than silicone. If you create a mold using silicone as the foundation, pouring food materials inside means you get food materials out, without sticking. For your beads, consider that you ...


2

Food coloring is ideal for safe consumption, and when dying eggs, it's important to note that both the concentration of dye used and the length of time you leave the egg in the dye will affect saturation. An excellent addition to food coloring is to use beeswax to create white areas by resisting the dye. This is an excellent way to add contrast to your ...


1

Food safe, moldable materials are rare in general. The closest thing that comes to my mind is a kind or "organic plastic" made from milk, but it looked hard to work with and I don't know how food safe that really is on the long run. Take for example a simple porcelain dish: the porcelain itself is porous and would stain with food residue. It's the glaze ...


1

Wikipedia has the following to say about that specific brand of adhesives: After curing, the joint is claimed to be impervious to boiling water and all common organic solvents. Assuming yours is an epoxy-based adhesive, this forum offers a lot more information on the food-safety of (general) epoxies: You can use epoxy - once fully cured, it is ...


1

You may want to consider photo lithography image transfer onto clay. If you want it to be a bit easier than that, then ceramic decal paper is another option.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible