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9

The flat parts of the wire are achieved by using a curved face chasing hammer and a hammering block. The chasing hammer has a slightly convex surface that makes those nice smooth transitions from the flat part of the wire to the regular rounded part of the wire. If the hammer surface is too flat you'll see hammer marks on the wire. Visually check the hammer ...


9

Possible? Probably If you have an a soldering iron and some fine wire, you can make a semi permanent bracelet - I say semi permanent rather than permanent because the kind of soldering you do on electronics isn't really designed for mechanical strength, and unless you buy some form of welder (the article you linked mentions arc welders) I'd expect the ...


8

There are three grades of hardness in jewellery wire: Full-hard, which is tempered wire that is very stiff. It's rarely used, because it's just too stiff for most jewellery. Half-hard, which is hardened during manufacture but is not fully tempered and is not so hard. It's pliable by hand, but you need to use some force to do it and pliers are often easier. ...


7

As I recall there are grades of microcrystalline wax available in different hardnesses and melting temperatures, so do try others. I have always used a moldable base to support detailed work. Pitch mixed with Plaster of Paris is the old reliable method. This can be softened with a propane torch, the work pressed in, and upon cooling - you have firm support ...


7

The normal way to do this is to use something soft inside the box to provide impact protection (usually foam), and then a layer of something over the foam to provide a more durable, scratch free and better looking surface (usually velvet). Velvet is also popular because it is less slippery than other options, so pieces don't slide around inside the box as ...


7

When considering the compatibilty of coating materials, the intended use (jewellery) is less important than the base material. Nail polish/paint sticks well to some materials and not others. Without knowing what your "white" jewellery is made of, we can't tell you whether it wil stick well. It's not really designed to be permanent, so I would advise ...


7

The chopin chain is a type of rope chain in which every slightly twisted link embraces two others: (source. click to enlarge) Depending on the thickness of the links, the character of the chain can seem a lot fuller: (source. click to enlarge) If google images is any indication, the most common type of rope chain, for comparison is the one that, not ...


7

I am in no way a jewelry maker, or jewelry specialist. Mostly good at looking up information. Since art is in my field(of enjoyment), spent some time researching the types of chain that was described above. It seems like the type of chain you are looking for is called, "panther chain."


6

Most of the wire I see in the stores today is mostly copper or something bonded to copper and it's usually dead soft. Here are some tips and tricks I have learned over time: Hammering: A regular jewelry hammer will change the shape of the wire unless you use a jewelry hammer with a rubber or nylon head. It really only works on flat pieces and is kind of ...


6

The look of it strongly reminds me of christmas tree balls. They even work according to the same principle. Maybe you have some old christmas tree balls you don't like anymore or one that's broken. Pull the cap out and remove the wire from the rest of the cap.


6

Different metals have different issues. For example, aluminum is highly reactive with the alkaline concrete (the reaction is used to create foamed concrete). Iron rusts and decomposes all the way through. Besides losing its integrity, the rust can crack the concrete. Brass is much less affected by the concrete. The concrete can accelerate development of ...


5

If you want it to hang vertically you will need to do a fair amount of reworking of the setting, this is complicated by any soldering runs the risk of damaging the stone. If you just want to extend the chain it is probably just as easy to buy a new chain of the correct length and do a direct swap. You can get a huge variety of chains from jewelers supplier ...


5

In my jewelry making course way back in 2000, heating metal for soldering required actual flame... a torch. You wouldn't want to do this with the equipment you have at all. It's a totally different process. There are two different soldering methods in jewelry making: soft solder and hard solder. While many craft-y projects can be assembled using soft solder ...


5

If the scratch is small enough but has discolored edges (like a scratched or chipped glass) then you could rub some vaseline or silicone oil over it to even out the light refraction. If the scratch is deeper, I'm afraid there's not much you can do but grind the stone down and polish it again. Filling the scratch with things like clear nail polish, spray ...


5

It is indeed copper, but a cheap alloy instead of the chemically pure copper that's needed for high quality cables and circuit boards. I cannot say exactly of which different metals it consists, but it usually includes lots of copper (as the base), nickel, pewter, sometimes zink or lead and sometimes traces of other elements like phosphor, beryllium or ...


5

Stainless steel ( assuming 316 ) is more corrosion resistant than silver and would not darken in air. Silver darkens with exposure to hydrogen sulfide ; yes I know there is "no" H2S around the home. However some smell from eggs is a ppb ( part per billion = not very much) of H2S , and most of that and sewer gas H2S finds and reacts with any silver turning ...


5

Some more observations that didn't fit into a comment: The stones are certainly no precious stones. The color indicates glass stones. If you're willing, you could try scratching the surface in an unobtrusive place like the edge where they're connected to the metal. If you can chip or scratch them with a nail or other sharp object, they are glass stones. The ...


4

You can use food grade silicon for casting as well as for making molds. What you need to look for is chocolate casting silicon. They are pretty expensive and there are plenty of manufacturers, but you need to follow the directions very carefully. In Europe I have had good experience with a product called schokomold If you do cast silicon in a silicon mold,...


4

I did a Google search which led me to a Pinterest page called "Jewelry : cold connections : clasps, bails, lockets, hinges, rivets." Looking at the pictures led me to some potential search terms and other ideas. I was looking for a hook and eye type clasp, but there were no pictures of the exact concept I was thinking of--but it would be a riff on this ...


4

I know what you mean about terminology being the key. My quick pop of research shows me that you might want to use "friction clasp" as the search terms, especially as a number of sites which return from this have direct reference to locket construction. The publisher of this page attempted a friction clasp closure for the locket and was not happy/successful ...


4

Just thinking out loud here. Rotate the pendant 90 degrees. Solder hooks on the opposite side mirroring the two on the other side. Add the new chain. Attach the chains together with loops. Done.


4

Former goldsmith here. I used to work with gold, a lot, but not so much with steel, and I never did damascus or mokume gane. From your question I'm guessing it may be the opposite for you ? Before thinking about durability, I would question feasability. Due to their very different fusion temperatures, and different "behavior" when heated, these two metals ...


4

Is this to make a pattern for investment casting? If so, any wax or plastic (with no filler like Fiberglass) can be used. When I worked in the industry they made patterns of paraffin wax and used beeswax blend for attachments. As I remember, they mostly used soldering irons for shaping. The molds were burned out at 1700°F; this may be different in the ...


4

You could repurpose a carpentry drill, Dremel rotary tool, or even a makeup nail buffer to serve as a small buffer. Specialty bits are available for carpentry drills and Dremel which have the buffing cloth already attached.


4

No, you definitely don't need a buffer Image from Wikimedia Commons This gold belt buckle dates from the 6th century - long before buffing machines were invented. Finishing jewellery by hand is the traditional way to do it, and as you can see the results can be excellent. However, you can't get this kind of finish just with sandpaper Going up through the ...


4

I've used a food grade silicone in the past that has the consistency of pudding. It is rather soft and very weak and would not hold up in the example you provide. I have used a more expensive silicone, also food grade that requires substantial mixing to get good results, often requiring vacuum degassing for smooth surfaces. In your example, I expect that ...


4

so maybe something like that? I just used 2 pieces of bent and shaped 18 gauged wire, hammered out to make the pieces sit more flat, and then used 2 thin pieces of beading wire to anchor the 2 pieces together


4

Why not start with a copper chain and see how much fun it is before the expense of platinum ? Copper wire is readily available in giant size range. Platinum wire sizes will be limited. They seem to be in about the same strength range depending on the amount of cold work. When our technicians wound custom heating equipment with platinum wire , there was no ...


4

Mainly a terminology thing, but "concrete" wouldn't be used for jewelry. That term refers to a mix that includes large aggregate that's held together with a cement binder. On something like a road or sidewalk, the layer of rocks provides the strength and the cement just holds it in place. On relatively thick art castings, you might be able to ...


3

For removing the stick pin backing, you need to remove the parts that stick out and file it down to be smooth. To remove, I'd use one of the following: a Dremel tool with appropriate bit if it looks like the badge was soldered, a soldering iron to un-solder it. (Make sure that the front of the badge won't be damaged by the heat, and follow safety ...


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