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6

There are a lot of pros and cons to both methods of placing beads into your knitting, but when looking only at stability there is a difference between prestrung and placed beads. Having used both methods, I find the placed beads stay precisely where you put them whereas the prestrung beads can slip. When you place a bead you put it on precisely the stitch ...


5

Consider beading, being the decoration of fabric with beads. Or, more specifically to embroidery, bead embroidery.


4

You can use food grade silicon for casting as well as for making molds. What you need to look for is chocolate casting silicon. They are pretty expensive and there are plenty of manufacturers, but you need to follow the directions very carefully. In Europe I have had good experience with a product called schokomold If you do cast silicon in a silicon mold,...


4

At first I was going to say this isn't really a collage, since it's sewn rather than glued, but I learned that this does qualify as a three-dimensional collage. A 3D collage is the art of putting altogether three-dimensional objects such as ... beads ... to form a new whole or a new object. Examples can include ... bead circles -- Wikipedia This is ...


4

I've used a food grade silicone in the past that has the consistency of pudding. It is rather soft and very weak and would not hold up in the example you provide. I have used a more expensive silicone, also food grade that requires substantial mixing to get good results, often requiring vacuum degassing for smooth surfaces. In your example, I expect that ...


3

In my experience in doing both, I largely prefer to place the beads. Pre-strung causes a whole host of issues: Sharp Beads may fray or cut your yarn Beads (especially glass beads) can easily break. You will have to string extras to account for this. The aggravation of having to move potentially hundreds (or more for a more complecated design) of beads down ...


3

I actually did this six months ago, and the shape that I cast is still solid, virtually indestructible and mold-free, so I am speaking from experience here. The instructions I wrote down here for making milk paint are very similar, but with a few notable differences. It is very important that you work in a hygienic and sterile environment, which means ...


3

Likely 10 X would be enough; and practical. Higher magnification is difficult to hand hold steady enough , so certainly at 30 X you are talking about expensive equipment that is mounted on a stand : Typically a zoom binocular going from 10 to 40 X. Also light becomes critical. You can carry a 10 X loop in your pocket and they are the standard for looking ...


3

It should be possible to calculate this, but note that it will depend on your eyesight as well, and the contrast you can get (directional lighting may help) If you look at how many characters there are in a typical inscription (I've seen up to about 30 for synthetic diamonds online;this is lovely to be a worst case), and how much space they fit in, you can ...


2

I agree with the basic idea of what fred-dot-u mentioned, but I'd tweak the method a bit. Put your beads on a wire. Cut apart an old coat-hanger with snips and use that. This would give you a sprue through all the beads at once. Make sure the wire is the same length as the Tupperware that you're gonna use. This way your sprue goes all the way ...


2

If your objective is to create a silicone product, take a different viewpoint of your research thus far. Silicone molds work because silicone sticks to almost nothing other than silicone. If you create a mold using silicone as the foundation, pouring food materials inside means you get food materials out, without sticking. For your beads, consider that you ...


1

This is an old question but from the number of views, other people have a similar interest. Nothingismagick's answer addresses how to make multiple beads. I'll address two holes in the discussion. For molding small parts like beads, you don't want to start with crude cottage cheese. That's the result of the first step in the process; the material needs ...


1

Two things I can think of: Make sure the design is not fragile. The dragon of your example looks strong enough, but if you create a deer with thin legs, for example, I think it's more likely to break. Especially if you'd attach a large flower to one of the legs, so there is a thin connection between two heavier parts. Also, be aware that letters and parcels ...


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