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24

Unlikely. There's a reason people keep separate fabric scissors from their regular scissors--cutting through fabric requires a very sharp blade, which you're unlikely to find on the average pizza cutter (designed to cut through soft cooked materials). What you're seeing is a rotary cutter, a circular blade on a handle that's sharp enough to cut through ...


16

Sharpie might work, but will have some bleed on the fabric when applied that may cause the mark to spread farther than would be covered by the pins. Additionally, while you want something "permanent" right now, what happens if you lose the pins but still wish to wear the shirt? Instead of using a permanent marker, I would recommend getting a hand-sewing ...


11

It's called "paisley" in English. Paisley or paisley pattern is an ornamental design using the buta (Persian: بته‎) or boteh, a teardrop-shaped motif with a curved upper end. Of Persian origin,1 paisley designs became very popular in the West in the 18th and 19th centuries, following imports of post-Mughal Empire versions of the design from India, ...


11

Yes, if it is sufficiently sharpened. But... no restaurant would ever do that. I've worked in multiple restaurants including Pizza Hut (wow, that was 30 years ago). Most places used a rotary pizza cutter, except Pizza Hut had long curved blade at the cut station for normal pizzas. We called it the bat'leth*. Every utensil was made of high quality stainless ...


10

To prevent fraying, use a z-stitch (zig-zag stitch) with a standard sewing machine or serge the ends of the fabric before you wash it. I've recently read a lot of guides about washing fabric before sewing and, while they often disagree about whether washing is necessary or not - generally depending on the type of fabric and the end use, the one thing they ...


10

This is an article that I have posted on my website for quite some time. I hope you find it helpful. Plastisol / Screen Printed Transfers These are transfers that are screen printed by an outside transfer company or by yourself with the use of screen printing equipment Durability – Very Good, often outlasts the life of the garment. Look/Feel – ...


10

Most commercial flags are made out of nylon. It's lightweight, durable, and dyes well. Specifically, the flags on many sites are made from DuPont SolarMax™, which is supposed to be nicely color safe in the sun. For inside use, you should probably be fine with a ripstop style nylon. This heavyweight DuPont SolarMax™ nylon is the most popular and versatile ...


9

It sounds like she already has a basic "starter kit" for sewing. So, instead of getting her a comprehensive kit, I would try to focus on one or two high-quality items that would save her time, or make her work easier in some way. Here are a few suggestions. An adjustable-size dress form. Make sure you get an adjustable one, because presumably her ...


8

You can buy "heat-resistant fabric" by the yard at large fabric stores in the utility fabrics section (literally called "ironing board fabric" at a popular chain) or online (several sources came up on a search), for about the same price as cotton duck or canvas, often for less. Measure the board and be sure to allow fabric to tuck under and attach to the ...


8

You have the right idea. Sewing near the edge but leaving the actual edge raw will achieve a frayed edge. Things to keep in mind: This will only work on a woven fabric, not a knit. Most importantly, not all edges will fray equally on a circle shape. Because of the nature of a woven fabric, the threads are horizontal and vertical. Certain places around the ...


8

Yes, using upholstery vinyl for bookbinding is certainly a possibility. I got a large reem of it from my grandfathers and was curious if it would work. I found my result to be satisfactory (see pictures below). The part that concerned me was the stiffness difference between my leather books and my new upholstered book. It still opens and closes fine but it ...


8

Instead of securing the fabric with the scews, I'd let the fabric secure itself on the outer edge of the wood. The less holes you poke into a fabric, the stronger it is to withstand tearing or wearing out. Instead of a simple hem, you could roll and secure the fabric (light blue) around a cord or other thick material (dark blue) to create a bulge that is ...


8

This isn't just for fabric, but carpet and all sorts of material on rolls. A linear metre simply means 1 metre length off the roll. It says nothing at all about the width, which is usually more than a metre for fabric, but for some things may be much less. The width should be specified elsewhere in the description, to allow you to calculate how much to buy. ...


8

Basically what makes good sewing scissors is that they are nice and sharp, and will make a clean cut. So the simplest way to find out if your scissors are good for cutting fabric is to test them on some fabric. Take a scrap of fabric (not a large piece that you want to use for a project) and try to cut it. If you can cut a nice clean line in a single snip, ...


8

Just for fun, I tried it, with a well-used pizza cutter and scrap materials on a cutting mat. Though the pizza cutter is old, it still does its intended job of cutting pizza very well. It wouldn't go through thin cotton (probably an old pillowcase, that I use for checking the sewing machine is running properly). It wouldn't go through light ripstop ...


7

You may need to combine different materials to get all the qualities you're looking for. Here are some ideas: Canvas and denim are strong, abrasion-resistant fabrics. Another option is ripstop nylon, which is manufactured to be strong, lightweight, and resist rips and tears. The weight of your fabric will determine how strong it is. For additional strength, ...


7

Cotton! My mother made her own iron board covers out of cotton. Since it is natural you don't have to worry about it trapping steam, or melting from the heat of the iron. The heavier the fabric, the better.


7

I would hesitate to cut my fabric into smaller pieces for storage, just because I can pretty much guarantee that as soon as you cut your fabric, the universe will send you the perfect pattern for that particular piece of fabric--but the pattern will require about 1/2 yard longer than your chosen cutting length. But the reason I wanted to post an answer is ...


7

Waxed cotton has the weight and drape. Here's a wiki link https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waxed_cotton Another benefit to waxed cotton is its ability to "heal". Once punctured leather, pleather, and vinyl will keep that hole. Also waxed cotton would be great as your mockup so you can tailor and make adjustments.


7

The instructions you've posted call for "two 43" x 65" pieces of fabric." While there are a wide variation of fabric widths available, the standard US widths are (approximately) 45" and 60". As this piece easily fits into a length of 45" fabric (which is often actually closer to 43"), it stands to reason that the pattern is calling for the more common 45" ...


7

Unlike natural fibers which can be blocked by simply shaping the item while wet, blocking acrylic requires heat. Many people try to wet-block acrylic the same way they would do wool, and they aren't happy with the results so they conclude (incorrectly) that there's no point in blocking acrylic. That's not true. There's simply very little point in wet ...


7

The equipment you listed is exactly what I would have suggested as a genral starter pack. Sewing machine is a no-brainer. The "pizza cutter" is called a "rotary cutter" and is favored by most people. The mat is a requirement to use the rotary cutter. Anything that could be useful to her after that depends on what she makes, but a few ...


6

Since this was mass-produced clothing, they probably do have a special machine for it! You can see an example in action around 2:45 in this video "How It's Made: Jeans". They're using a machine like this one, the Singer 261u: You can see how the arm is shaped in a way that would allow you to scrunch up the leg. You could try topstitching like this on a ...


6

I'm assuming from your question that you're looking to have the cape flared out around and behind you while you are standing still, as the cape will naturally take that shape when you're in motion. My best recommendations to accomplish that appearance would be to use plastic ("boning" for corsets) or wire (strong but flexible, ie. aluminum armature wire) ...


6

We actually have a good idea of which scroll materials last for hundreds of years, because we have scrolls that are hundreds of years old. What are they made of? Parchment We have two thousand year old scrolls written on parchment (as required for Jewish Torah scrolls). These seem to be mainly written using ordinary carbon black ink, but many (particularly ...


6

Nep Generally, a nep is defined as an entanglement of fibers, that can be caused by environmental factors during growth, processing or are inherent to particular varieties. abtexintl.net hm.com indiamart.com taylorstitch.com asos.com Fleck Nep superdenim.com realmccoyslondon.com Flecked Corduroy


6

Warmth in clothing comes mostly from trapped air, which is a good insulator. Water is a good conductor of heat, and water vapor can transfer heat. With acrylic, depending on the characteristics of how the fiber was made and how the fiber is used to create a fabric, it can be a better insulator than wool. However, clothing presents a challenge because the ...


6

There are fabrics of different materials and weaves designed specifically for that purpose. They hold up to UV and wind, dry quickly, are resistant to abrading through where they are secured or in contact with supports, and offer different levels of light filtering. They are sold as "outdoor canopy fabric" and "awning and shade fabric". ...


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