10

What do you need? You can make rings out of all metal that can be bent by hand and all that can be hammered into shape. Wire comes in many sizes. Unless you have a hobby involving metal wire, you will likely not stock it. But a good metal shop will have a few kinds and can often order more for you. No tools to bend: The 'easy' way is to have wire which is ...


9

What you are looking for is called spring steel or spring-tempered wire. Tempering is a process where the wire is hardened by heating which allows the resulting spring steel to return to its original shape, despite significant deflection or twisting. When you bend a spring wire, it will maintain a strong, circular loop without kinking anywhere along its ...


9

The flat parts of the wire are achieved by using a curved face chasing hammer and a hammering block. The chasing hammer has a slightly convex surface that makes those nice smooth transitions from the flat part of the wire to the regular rounded part of the wire. If the hammer surface is too flat you'll see hammer marks on the wire. Visually check the hammer ...


9

Treating with vinegar (or other acids) tends to form a dark grey patina, depending on how it is applied it can also also show variations in shade. More viscous things like mustard and tomato sauce can be dabbled or stippled on to create a distinctly mottled effect. Acids also work well to strip off or at least dull bright zing plating and galvanising. This ...


8

The melting temperature of a magnet is irrelevant because it loses it's magnetation long before melting. Have a look at this site and you'll see that the maximum working temperature of neodymium magnets is approx. 230°C for the most heat resistant magnets. This site explains why the magnets get permanently demagnetized by heat. The only way to embed a ...


7

You could also use bicycle brake-cable wire— it's very bendy, tough, and virtually impossible to permanently fold. If you know any bikers, they might have old brake cables you could get for free. You should join it with crimp sleeves.


6

In addition to your own answer: Jewelers (and most chain mail workers that I know, including myself) use a type of pliers called "chain nose pliers." I don't really know why they have that name, but they have nice pointy tips for getting into the rings and smooth surfaces on the inside. Here's an article about chain nose vs. round nose pliers: ...


6

Bend it around something like steel pipe ( a mandrel).Clamp one end of the rod and the pipe in a vice and pull or push the rod around ; you can use a hammer It does require a sturdy vice. After the first bend rotate the pipe and rod into the vice jaw to make more bends such as 180 or 360 degrees. Once you practice it is easy; i have made about 25 copper "S" ...


6

In order for the "tines" on your comb to ring brightly, you must begin with spring steel. You may use a flat piece of steel and cut the teeth into it or use a long length of quality steel bar such as a metal yard rake. I used a length of sewer cleaning flat bar--cheap and very good steel. I simply cut it into 15 pieces about 3 1/2" long. You ...


6

As you're only working in thin aluminium, I suggest a gouge chisel. It will need sharpening fairly often (a diamond file is probably easiest) to go through easily but should do a good job. Use scrapwood clamped down securely as your anvil. I don't have a gouge, but I've tested a straight chisel successfully. My scrap aluminium is 3mm thick and a cut of ...


5

Torsion strain exceeding screw strength. It's likely that 3" of wood is creating some friction, even though your pilot hole is nominally larger in diameter. You might try a 3/16"ø pilot hole and see if that reduces the amount of torque needed. Deep holes of narrow diameters in soft materials are never perfectly straight so the extra room of a wider pilot ...


5

A couple of alternatives. Firstly, cheap and cheerful, use metal clothes hangers (normally given free from the dry cleaners). However, this would only offer you a limited range of gauges. Secondly, pop down to your local DIY/Garden Centre. They will have a large selection of fencing & plant growth materials. You will find all sorts of wire used for ...


5

Most hobby machine tools are made by a couple of Chinese manufacturers (notably Seig) and branded by the importer. However, while the basic machines are pretty similar the detailed specifications do vary and some brands will make a few key modifications and may provide more rigorous quality control. One thing to bear in mind is that, while you can do a lot ...


5

I made a butted link hauberk some years ago out of galvanized steel wire (the stuff I got was used in repairing fences - 20 gauge). Not as shiny as other materials but I felt it was more authentic looking. It is fairly easy to form and cut. The mandrel I used to form the links was 3/8" diameter. When completed there were some 40,000 links in it and it ...


5

In my jewelry making course way back in 2000, heating metal for soldering required actual flame... a torch. You wouldn't want to do this with the equipment you have at all. It's a totally different process. There are two different soldering methods in jewelry making: soft solder and hard solder. While many craft-y projects can be assembled using soft solder ...


5

Looks like there was already an answer here, but there are a lot of variables not considered: If you are going to send out your blades for heat-treatment, then any steel with medium carbide volume is going to be fine. These include the simple carbon steels, from 1070-1095, O1, A2 as well as stainless steels like AEB-L (Sandvik 13c26), CPM-154, S35VN. Note ...


5

Main precaution ; Do not touch it while it is hot. No vapors will come off the steel . What does A4 mean ? Your heating would be about right for forging. But for bending , try room temperature. It will bend very well unless you paid a premium for strain hardened bar. If you bend it extensively at room temperature it will harden. If you need to bend it more ,...


5

Working with my very basic press, I'd clamp the two pieces together very well, and drill all the pilot holes. Then separate the pieces and open out the clearance holes. I wouldn't go straight in with a 6mm drill in steel anyway. Note that you'll need a little over 6mm for a clearance hole. 6.5mm is common though might be too loose for you. In thin aluminium ...


5

I'm looking to cut a piece of metal in the shape of a pickguard, then have it professionally chromed The chrome will go away quite fast, considering the abuse it will have to take - regardless how kind and attentive you are while playing the guitar (also depending how much time you play that guitar, and the material and quality of the pick itself). Unless ...


5

For the benefit of other readers, let me start with a brief explanation, and I'll expand the terminology to include brazing. Soldering and brazing are the same process, the difference is the temperature at which it happens. Both involve using a filler metal that melts far below the temperature of the base metal to be joined; when this process happens below ...


4

Will this be mounted inside a larger 'table' made with firebricks, refractory, or something else or do you intend it to be 'free standing' as is? If free standing it should be suitable for light use (demonstrations and such) but I would keep to hand crank blowers as an air source. I knew a smith who used a cast iron frying pan as a demonstration forge (he ...


4

So I asked a Tinsmith friend and he suggested the followings: Iron wire: it is cheap and has the big advantage that it can be fold at the same place several times without breaking. So you can reuse it. Chicken Wire: This solution might be particularly interesting for you as it allows to make some more complicated complicated structures and, it is also ...


4

What materials you use depends on the design of the lamp shade you want to make – is it a hanging ceiling lamp, a desk lamp, etc. How sturdy the frame needs to be depends on what material it is supposed to support (paper, wood, glass, plastic, etc.) For example, if you are making a paper lamp shade, then the coat hanger wire should be fine (like in those ...


4

There are a few ways to make rings but they all suggest a tool budget. I consider copper your best alternative. It is malleable and soft, so you can hammer and bend. As Willeke said, it will oxidize and leave green rings on your finger but, that can be prevented by coating with shellac, varnish, or a clear spray paint. Copper is relatively inexpensive ...


4

For use with the widest range of metals, a properly prepared ceramic mold is your best bet. It can tolerate high temperatures and capture fine details well. However, these are commonly single-use molds that are broken to remove the cast object. Rather than trying to find a "silver bullet," you're better off targeting your specific needs for each case. If ...


4

Making one properly without a (metalworking) lathe would be very difficult. With one it's quite easy. This youtube video shows one made from simple hardware, and you could choose an appropriate screw for the shaft to fit your chuck. But I'm not sure I'd trust its centration (might not matter if you're just using it like the second video link). It may be ...


4

Maybe you could use epoxy resin instead of metal. It's not exactly cheap and you'd have to do some research as to which resin is best suited for your purpose (or suited at all), but there are tons of YouTube videos of how to design tables with epoxy. The coloration could be a problem because depending on the pigment it won't look like metal at all, even if ...


4

There is no other easily available alloy than Copper based ones that are gold colored. Brass is the most readily available that will have a gold color. There is also a very wide variety of bronzes that will let you choose a precise color. But Copper alloys are maybe not the best option have here. It is very heavy. There is a wide variety of option to get ...


4

I assume the look you're hoping for is a little like this, a dirty gold: source, actually a 3d render If you're not planning on rebending the stand a lot, I'd suggest taking some acrylic paint (maybe some raw umber and black or similar dark and muddy colour), mix it with a little chalk or plaster (gypsum) to make it more dirty and matte (but make sure it ...


4

I think the best option are sheet metal cutting shears, either manually handled ones (like heavy duty scissors), or electrical ones (power tools), although the latter one seems a little overkill for these small strips. Here is a demonstration video of both. You can get quite clean cuts with the 'scissors' variant. A variant of these, referred to as 'tin ...


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