17

There are a few different ways to do this, but most of them involve extremes of temperature: first intense heat along the line where you want to cut the bottle, and then submerging in cold water, repeated several times if necessary. A Song of Water and Fire This method assumes you have a tool with which to score the glass, for instance a glass drill bit or ...


15

There usually two different kinds of glue you commonly find. One will come off if you just soak the label under water over night. Doesn't have to be soapy. It helps to score the surface of the label with a cross hatching with a razor. Some labels are waterproof. You need the water to get through to the glue. The other kind of glue will come off with VM&...


14

There are certainly several methods to be found online however most of them can have mixed results where you edges are concerned. This can be done rather well with a scoring jig, regular glass cutter and water. Depending on how often you are going to be doing this will influence the tools and jig. Scoring Cutting glass, so that it breaks predictably, can ...


9

There is yet another, more elegant solution, requiring no cutting tools. Safety goggles or glasses. Protect your eyes. Gather the following materials: Large metal bowl (common kitchen bowl) Glass to Cut Cooking oil piece of iron, to be held by tongs or pliers. Lighter, torch, or gas stove top Fill the glass container up to the place that you want it cut. ...


9

There are 2 kinds of glue used in bottles (as far as I'm aware): Water based glue; Oil based glue; To remove For water based Leave the bottle soaking overnight and scrub it next day. For oil based As oil is more expensive than water and soaking in oil would take up a lot of it, I just put oil in my hands and spread the oil on the label. Make sure the ...


9

The simplest approach is a hot needle. Hold a rather thick needle with pincers (pretty much any kind) and heat it up - stove fire will take seconds to make it glowing hot, but a candle flame should suffice. Melt the hole through both sides of the stubs. The needle should be considerably thicker than the one you'll use for sewing because the holes close up a ...


7

The "post-it" notes, if on standard sticky notes paper, cannot be made into a quilt directly. If you want to do this in future, you should look into coloured and starched squares of high thread-count cotton or linen to write on, use fabric markers to write the notes with, then just use them as normal quilting squares afterward. Real Quilt If you ...


6

I know this is not an embroidery solution per se, but what about binding the edges of the sleeve with something like a light weight felt (use real wool felt, not the kind you played with as a kid), and sewing the binding in place using a saddle stitch? If you are concerned about losing the elasticity in the cuffs, you could also use knit bias tape, which ...


6

I've done similar things after using food containers for candles. You may not actually need all these steps, but this is how to be very thorough. What I'd do is put them in a cool oven, just hot enough to thoroughly melt the wax (100°C should be enough). First, put them face down supported on wires over a drip tray. The vast majority of the wax will run ...


6

If you look closely at the images, you'll see the keys seem to float above the surface of the jacket a bit. I don't see an evidence of the keys being sewn directly to the fabric with side-holes, although I agree it is a good approach. I suggest sewing regular buttons onto the fabric and then gluing the keys to the buttons. Since they are both hard plastic,...


5

It depends on what you're making with it. When you're dealing with seamless T-shirts, I'd start at the bottom. Cut the hem off, then go around and around cutting about an inch (2.5cm) in one continuous strip. You can put a little mark on your finger to indicate the measurement so you don't have to draw all those lines, and it won't need to be absolutely ...


5

For labels not affected by the dishwasher I found that WD-40 removes most glues, and it has the advantage that it is easily absorbed by paper labels so just spraying it on the label and waiting is usually enough. Plastic labels are easier to peel off, a cloth or paper towel with WD-40 is usually enough to clean the remaining glue


5

There are specialised chemical sprays, available reasonably cheaply, for doing exactly this: I've always used the Maplins one. It comes in an aerosol spray bottle and with a long thin tube to attach to the aerosol so as to direct the spray very precisely if required. I've found it fast and effective at removing labels from not only glass but also plastic ...


5

Method for effortless removing labels and glue: Fill the bottle with boiling water and wait a few minutes. High temperature should weaken the adhesive, so the labels can be peeled in one piece. Use a kitchen funnel and baking glove to avoid hand burns. The adhesive will remain on the bottle. To wash it of use kitchen steel wool and ordinary vegetable ...


5

If you have particularly tough to remove labels, I have found Goo Gone to be very effective. Apply a bit to the label and let it sit for a couple of minutes. The label should come off really easily. Apply a little more to a paper towel and rub off the remaining adhesive left on the bottle. Then wash with hot water and soap. Goo Gone isn't very expensive and ...


4

Ours is the low-tech, slow method. An overnight soak in soapy water (start it out hot) usually helps the glue release pretty nicely and softens the paper so that it's easy to scrape. If the first soak doesn't do the job a second shorter soak without the paper usually will. We use the plastic scraper (from our juicer) to scrape the surface of the bottles. ...


4

Being someone who is always experimenting with new ideas on out-of-the-ordinary crafting / sewing projects such as this awesome one you have chosen, I have some thoughts. In this situation I would think about drilling into the back outside edge of the key button itself, perhaps just two holes, on each on opposite sides of the square. It seems to me that {a}...


4

I homebrew, so on occasion end up removing labels from previously-enjoyed beer bottles before reusing for bottling my own beer. I've found that soaking overnight in a water solution of sodium percarbonate releases the majority of labels/glues. A couple of scoops (each about a cup) in a 5 gallon bucket of water seems to be a good dilution. Sodium ...


4

Vinegar I had never found just water alone to work. I usually felt the need to remove most of the label before I recycled it. But now I have tried vinegar to much success. Here is the bottle I tested with before: Since it has not been mentioned, I thought I would go into a little detail by doing an experiment. After removing what I could of the label and ...


4

I've recycled several glass candle containers into "whisky glasses". I put a squirt of washing up liquid in the bottom, then poured boiling water in, and left to soak/melt. After they were mostly clean, rinsed out, then stuck in the sink, again with lots of washing liquid, and filled with boiling water. Didn't get any breakages, and the "...


3

Have you considered topstitching? Stitching down all the edges that you want to have a crease in them will offer a mechanical fastener, in the form of thread, to keep the folds in place. This sidesteps the rubber's resistance to being holding a crease. You can test how it would look by attaching clothes pins or similar along where you would topstitch.


2

Many labels that won't just soak off can be removed with a heat gun or hair dryer. Just heat up the label, starting with the corner you want to start at, and they'll usually peel off nicely. You don't have to get it REALLY hot, just really warm it up. If I don't have a heat gun or hair dryer handy, or don't want to bother with it, I'll hold it over the ...


2

computercarguy's answer covers a lot of territory. I'll supplement that with a few other ideas. It sounds like the artwork has an "upcycled" appearance, being made from scrap pieces. You can carry that theme into the frame by making it out of scrap materials, also. For example, a simple picture frame made from pallet wood. You can stick with the metal ...


2

Wood BCX shouldn't warp on you, especially at 5/8" thick. It's rated for outdoor usage*, so as long as you treat/finish it correctly, you shouldn't have a problem with it warping. You could probably get away with 1/2", depending on how much weight you actually add with the mosaic. As far as finishing/treating it goes, that depends on how you are using it. ...


1

I would suggest to build the frame from slats of wood. You should be able to find them quite cheap. You fix the support for the mosaic on the frame - "sheets" of fiberglass mesh. The mesh is very light and gives extra strength to the frame. Also cheap and easy to find. For the frame itself, there are two options. Create a working frame from any wood (...


1

In scale model building, I apply waterslide decals over acrylic paint all the time. Obviously, those models are plastic, so I don't cook them. Instead, I put a light covering of clear coat over them after the paint has dried, then again after the decals are in-place and air-dried. I've left uncovered decals exposed to the air without any trouble in ...


1

A commercial paint remover of sufficient potency may solve your problem, although great care should be taken in handling and use. A friend runs a shop using aircraft paint removal chemicals. Once applied and placed in sunlight, the paint bubbles and scrapes off easily. The same chemical burns like a match if even the smallest drop touches skin. Perhaps ...


1

You know, depending on the type of label, there's nothing wrong with letting the bottles sit in hot soapy water for awhile (half an hour or so), which will soften up the label and glue, and you should be able to remove most of it pretty easily after that. Whatever remains will come off with a soapy sponge and hot water. Simple, really.


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