15

You have two options: Prettier - the Ladder Stitch, and Stronger - the Baseball Stitch. First, the Ladder Stitch. Quoting the linked site: First, poke your threaded and knotted needle through the bad side of one cloth, ensuring that the knot is on the inside of the plushie. Next, pass the needle partway through the good side of the other piece of ...


15

Sharpie might work, but will have some bleed on the fabric when applied that may cause the mark to spread farther than would be covered by the pins. Additionally, while you want something "permanent" right now, what happens if you lose the pins but still wish to wear the shirt? Instead of using a permanent marker, I would recommend getting a hand-sewing ...


8

The simplest approach is a hot needle. Hold a rather thick needle with pincers (pretty much any kind) and heat it up - stove fire will take seconds to make it glowing hot, but a candle flame should suffice. Melt the hole through both sides of the stubs. The needle should be considerably thicker than the one you'll use for sewing because the holes close up a ...


7

To prevent (actually: to minimise) fraying, you can use zig zag scissors known as pinking shears. And you can use non-woven interfacing. Make sure you choose a type that has a pre-glued side. You can iron it to fabric. It prevents fraying and deforming.


7

You need to stiffen the fibres so that the thread does not tear though them while you are sewing. Clear nail polish I ended up buying a small container and applied in all along the edges of the tie tail. About a 1/4 inch all around. After letting it dry it gave something for the thread to hold onto. Made it loads easier to get cleaner results.


7

This is an article that I have posted on my website for quite some time. I hope you find it helpful. Plastisol / Screen Printed Transfers These are transfers that are screen printed by an outside transfer company or by yourself with the use of screen printing equipment Durability – Very Good, often outlasts the life of the garment. Look/Feel – ...


7

Waxed cotton has the weight and drape. Here's a wiki link https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waxed_cotton Another benefit to waxed cotton is its ability to "heal". Once punctured leather, pleather, and vinyl will keep that hole. Also waxed cotton would be great as your mockup so you can tailor and make adjustments.


6

This will be untested, as I've never done such a thing, but I think my theory is sound. I would take a rotary tool, such as a Dremel, with a fine drill bit. Then I'd drill two holes at a shallow angle on opposite sides of the key's center support. Do all four sides if you want to sew them more like 4-hole buttons. From here, I'd recommend a curved sewing ...


6

If the dress is ready for replacement, you can remove the seams. You don't have to remove all of them, just the ones so the fabric can be layed down flat. I wouldn't recommend removing seams if you still want to wear the dress. Another option is measuring: draw the pieces of your dress on paper as good as you can. Cut them out. Then put on your dress and ...


6

The "Stitching" on the edge of your sleeve, is actually a strip of fabric, that was folded around the raw edge of the loden cloth, and sewn to the loden cloth. This strip of fabric is called "Binding". (it's not piping, because there's no cord running through it. The puffiness comes from the thickness of the boiled wool loden cloth inside it). The ...


6

I know this is not an embroidery solution per se, but what about binding the edges of the sleeve with something like a light weight felt (use real wool felt, not the kind you played with as a kid), and sewing the binding in place using a saddle stitch? If you are concerned about losing the elasticity in the cuffs, you could also use knit bias tape, which ...


5

In order to answer, I want to back up a minute, and explain a bit about how loden fabric is made. Loden is a type of felted/fulled wool fabric, which means that an original fabric is created by weaving or knitting (per this website, loden fabric is woven). Once the fabric has been created, you basically get the fabric wet and then abuse it mercilessly until ...


5

I made a butted link hauberk some years ago out of galvanized steel wire (the stuff I got was used in repairing fences - 20 gauge). Not as shiny as other materials but I felt it was more authentic looking. It is fairly easy to form and cut. The mandrel I used to form the links was 3/8" diameter. When completed there were some 40,000 links in it and it ...


5

If you look closely at the images, you'll see the keys seem to float above the surface of the jacket a bit. I don't see an evidence of the keys being sewn directly to the fabric with side-holes, although I agree it is a good approach. I suggest sewing regular buttons onto the fabric and then gluing the keys to the buttons. Since they are both hard plastic,...


5

It depends on what you're making with it. When you're dealing with seamless T-shirts, I'd start at the bottom. Cut the hem off, then go around and around cutting about an inch (2.5cm) in one continuous strip. You can put a little mark on your finger to indicate the measurement so you don't have to draw all those lines, and it won't need to be absolutely ...


5

You could sew a passepoil pocket (I don't know if there is a more common way to call it in English), and maybe use a zipper to close it. If there is a seam at the side, you might want to use that as the location for the pocket. Anyways, for instructions (in Dutch, but with a lot of pictures) you can check http://fromfabrictofashion.nl/diy-de-paspelzak/ . If ...


5

Check your local thrift and goodwill stores. You might be able to find a suitable sized duster which only needs a little repair, some leather treatment or a good cleaning to fill the bill. If not, you might find a larger sized leather (or leather-like) garment from which you can harvest enough quality leather to make your costume. If not even that, you ...


4

Your hat has a very open structure, so, to fix a hole invisibly is hard/impossible, as you need to weave in material where it's missing, but then you got a double amount of material at the edge of the hole. However, since you 'just' want to make it look nice, you could reweave the hat (with either straw, wool, or any other material of thead) about as thick ...


4

Being someone who is always experimenting with new ideas on out-of-the-ordinary crafting / sewing projects such as this awesome one you have chosen, I have some thoughts. In this situation I would think about drilling into the back outside edge of the key button itself, perhaps just two holes, on each on opposite sides of the square. It seems to me that {a}...


4

Self-answering with my solution. After asking around, I had suggestions for: Poly fill Down Flannel Wool Batting Poly fill and down seem suitable for very puffy jackets (source), but didn't fit my vision of this particular one - might be too puffy, plus the lining would have to be more complicated to keep it distributed evenly. Flannel and wool would be ...


4

Bonded leather comes to mind. Bonded leather is made by shredding leather scraps and leather fiber, then mixing it with bonding materials. The mixture is next extruded onto a fiber cloth, or paper backing, and the surface is usually embossed with a leather-like texture or grain. From wikipedia This is already used in clothing, accessories, upholstery ...


4

Since this was mass-produced clothing, they probably do have a special machine for it! You can see an example in action around 2:45 in this video "How It's Made: Jeans". They're using a machine like this one, the Singer 261u: You can see how the arm is shaped in a way that would allow you to scrunch up the leg. You could try topstitching like this on a ...


4

I'd recommend you head to a camping supply store (like REI or Academy ) and pick up some tent repair tape. Its usually rip-stop nylon with adhesive on the back. It will reinforce the pvc so you can add buttons etc.


3

I would hesitate to cut my fabric into smaller pieces for storage, just because I can pretty much guarantee that as soon as you cut your fabric, the universe will send you the perfect pattern for that particular piece of fabric--but the pattern will require about 1/2 yard longer than your chosen cutting length. But the reason I wanted to post an answer is ...


3

The "iron-on stuff to stick them together" that you'd heard about is called fusible interfacing. For satin, you will be looking for a "lightweight" or "feather" interfacing that has heat-activated adhesive. It only needs a second or less of contact with an iron to melt to fabric, and will not bleed through like glue. I recently used it to attach lace to ...


3

There is a paper/synthetics mix out there which is advertised as vegan leather (I'm sorry, I wasn't able to find this in English). You can wash, iron and sew it, as well as paint on it and iron pictures on it. I worked with it and I have to say it is quite hard and sturdy, but I only washed it at 30°C and did not wrinkle it very well. It has a leathery look ...


3

If you are happy to hand draw, you can get permanent markers specially made for fabrics, which will stay in even if washed often. These also come in many colours and in several surface structures. Less fancy but often nearer at hand, normal permanent markers, like sharpies. These will fade a bit with washing but mostly good for several to many wash cycles. ...


2

Have you looked at the Alabama Chanin books? I've read only the sewing patterns one, which is meant to help readers make the stuff that A. Chanin makes and sells. It's worth a mention for the clear photos and instructions for sewing seams by hand in cotton jersey. They suggest backstitch, plus hand-sewn zigzag or blanket stitch to catch the cut edges. For ...


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