10

There are many different kinds of finishes that are food safe. It turns out most finishes once dried or cured are food safe to one level or another. Most finishes that cure are only food safe after they have finished curing which, sometimes can take quite a while, days, weeks, for some months. Many of the food oil finishes are very food safe, peanut and ...


9

Preparation As the wood dries, it shrinks. You'll likely get big splits and cracks. The rule of thumb for a board (vs. a round) is a year of drying per inch of thickness. Wood dries faster through the end grain but also tends to develop splits and cracks as a result because of the uneven shrinkage (but has less tendency to warp in that orientation). You ...


7

This is not really an answer to your title question, and more of a solution to your situation, but, as fixer1234 mentions, no colouring method will evenly pervade the MDF fibres after they have been pressed while keeping the overall structure intact. Nevertheless, coloured MDF can be bought in several places and online (e.g. 'Coloured MDF', 'Colored MDF', '...


6

There are several basic groups of wood turning lathes based on size. There are the pen/mini lathes, the midi lathes and your full sized lathes. Pen/mini lathes are the smallest. These are almost always bench top models have a small foot print and smaller swing often 8-10". Bed lengths vary. Midi Lathes are larger than mini's and tend to have a 10-12" ...


6

Plywood is ultimately the answer. When making box joints or finger joints you need to have dimensionally uniform and preferably stable wood. Plywood comes in many sizes and I would imagine something like 8mm would be fine. If you are OK with something larger like 16mm then you would have stronger joints as there would be more surface area. This is ...


6

No, it's not too hard. For the beginner, Basswood and Butternut woods are the easiest to carve. Don't be confused about the hardwood and softwood definitions as they aren't literal interpretations of the wood's hardness. One source for carving woods is Heinecke Wood Products - https://www.heineckewood.com/ The Sculpture Studio has a list of some of the ...


5

Cutting out the truck and trees would be pretty straight forward. Just find equivalent vector art in whatever format your laser likes. Online trace and format transformation websites are available to help with that step. To make the truck and trees stand up, you will need to add a square tab to the bottom of each tire and to the base of the tree's trunk. ...


5

Most waxes and oils are, in themselves, food safe in indeed may of them are in fact food ingredients. The complication is that products used for finishing may contain additives and solvents which are potentially toxic although solvents, which by their nature disappear once the finish is cured tend to be less of a issue than drying agents. The best advice ...


5

Not sure if you want to hear this but this is better handled before finishing as supposed to mitigating after the fact. Either way I think you need to sand the roughness out you have first then do something to prepare the edges for finishing. In your case finishing would be painting. Preparing Plywood Edges Plywood surfaces are usually finish ready. That is ...


5

When using a water based paint, you will for certain cause the grain to raise and funny things that look like tear-out on the edges. To avoid this, before painting, I sand, then intentionally raise the grain with water, i.e. I paint it with water. Then I sand again to remove the raised grain and the tear-out. Finally I paint it with pigmented paint - in ...


4

Disclaimer: I've never actually made a needle for naalbinding, but I have done some other wood carving and the principles are the same. The site from which you (presumably) got your picture lists a few materials that naalbinding needles can and have been made from, including the following: juniper rowan tree honeysuckle lilac olive tree fruit trees (like ...


4

Epoxy resin I love the stuff for the same reason John Vukelic's answer does so I would recommend it here as well. Even some of the cheap 2 parts should work perfectly fine for this. It is very good at bonding different material even when the surfaces are not perfectly mated. The two parts about Gorilla Glue that need to be cautioned here is that it has ...


4

The properties of the wood, especially its density will have a significant effect on the tone of the instrument but there is quite a wide variety used as well as various laminates. Of critical importance is the stability of the wood as even small amounts of warping can seriously affect play-ability, this is especially the case with the neck which needs to ...


4

Jigsaw is a poor choice of tool for this given the size of the finished product and that it is a roughing tool more designed for cutting sheet goods. Tools to consider Bandsaw If the polyhedron was a little larger and your valued the tolerance of the finished product I would most certainly suggest the bandsaw as you can use a mitre slide and a custom ...


4

When turning wood, I use paraffin blocks to finish the projects. I hold a solid block against the turning piece and make sure that everything is coated. Then I take a clean cloth and buff the turning piece up. The only downside in my opinion is that it doesn't penetrated the wood very deep this way.


4

As Matt said, plywood is likely the simplest and most stable wood material to use to make this box. Though pine tends to be lighter than plywood of the same dimensions. Pine is easy to shape and will actually be easier for a beginner than plywood, since plywood (at least in my experience) likes to splinter easy around cuts. It has to do with the thin ...


4

The first response that popped into my alleged mind was a push-to-open latch. The link points to a Home Depot product, but there are many sources. Consider the concept of the lowly retractable ball-point pen. One push extends, the next, retracts. image courtesy of linked site The image shows a magnetic attractor to mate with a metal plate on the moving part....


3

You will get some penetration, but much less than a millimetre. One thing that should work is to trim very nearly flush, then mask the rest of the headstock and brush or wipe dye onto the sanded face, before smoothing with fine sandpaper (as any water in the dye will cause a little swelling). If you sand off too much, apply more dye, and while sanding, keep ...


3

An epoxy resin, or polyepoxide: a resin mixed with a hardener. This can be used both for filling in gaps in wood as well as encasing wood. Epoxy can give wood a waterproof, resilient finish. In most cases, it is an ideal coating for wood projects that will be exposed to moisture or wear. (source) Some epoxies are intended for use with wood, or, more ...


3

Wittling a spoon or butter knife is not that difficult, but a 5 prong fork might be a challenge. A two or three prong design would probably be easier. As for "duplicating" the particular style and design of the Ozark Trail products, that would depend on the skill of the wittler. The products that I have seen are plastic and factory smooth. Personally, if ...


3

Cut into rounds that big it will crack. You either need to embrace the cracking or dry even more slowly in a much thicker piece, only cutting later. This is a long term project. Endgrain should be sealed during the seasoning process. This has been covered in some depth at woodworking.se, which helped me on a much smaller project. The logo of course would ...


3

In the end, I went with balsa wood. I didn't like the way you can see all the plies of plywood. Also, pine apparently isn't easily available in Western Europe. The shop employee I talked to claimed that balsa wood has little difference between spring and autumn, which makes it very uniform and easy to saw. It is also very light (of weight and colour). Here ...


3

Anyone with a large enough tree is a potential source -- but you might have to do some more work (square it up to make a blank & dry it to the appropriate humidity to work it) When my neighbor had a maple dropped that was about 5' across, someone came up and asked if they could have some of the wood to make a cello. He had said that the trick was to ...


3

I think that a great way to transfer the shape to the wood would be to use a rubbing to create an outline of the space which you can then cut out of the paper and transfer to the wood. This is sort of reminiscent of how Indiana Jones saved the instructions for finding the grail from the shield under the library: You can use either a crayon or chalk or ...


3

I know that you yourself mentioned glass and listed the downsides, but there are also a couple of advantages that I wanted to point out. My kids elementary school has an annual holiday boutique, and each classroom does an arts&crafts project which is sold at the boutique (adoring parents make a captive audience). One year, one of the classrooms did a ...


3

-Note-: I started this answer before there was mention of potential of varnish on the table. This answer would hold outside of that. While you can usually epoxy over almost anything if you already have a varnished surface you might not need to bother. "Varnish" a little vague so it would be hard to be exactly sure. I would like to think the artist is aware ...


2

Usually you should let green wood dry for 2 years before carving objects out of them or using it to build something. Depending on the local climate, the size of the wood block (or tree) and how you dry it, the time may shorten to several months or extend to 5 years. Wood shrinks and warps as it dries. If you cut or carve it green, the size will be different ...


2

I don't want to focus on creating the shape outline as Catija's answer is a very simple approach for something like this. If this was a little bit different then other options might be viable as well. Perhaps using Plasticine or silicone to create a mold of the void. It would allow you to trace around the mold you create and get a gauge on depth. Unless you ...


2

As an possibly less expensive solution sandblasting the logo into the wood could work as well. A resist stencil from your logo would be made to mask out the raised areas, like the type and fawn drawing, then the background would be sandblasted out. It would be easy to then (spray) paint the whole sign the background color, and then with a roller or some ...


1

It sounds like the hard part of this process will be translating the logo onto the tree trunk / log. Drying As many have said, this is largely a process of patience. If your aesthetics can stomach it, you can affix a metal strap around the top and bottom of the section of the tree trunk, in order to minimize splitting. This is akin to how a barrel has ...


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