We changed our privacy policy. Read more.

Hot answers tagged

16

I think I can help you. To make a living, I carve glass. Tabletops, door fronts, serving platters, and almost anything else made of glass has seen my efforts. By far the best tool to use would be a Dremel type rotary tool with either a diamond burr or a stone grinding bit. These come in quite a variety of shapes, compound materials and grit levels and ...


12

If the knife is really that blunt, I recommend taking it to be professionally sharpened. Many craft stores offer this service either as part of their regular services or on a part-time basis (once or twice a month). Otherwise, you may have a knife sharpener in your city who would be able to do it. The cost is generally based on the length of the blade, so ...


11

If your models cannot be in contact with latex you can use alternatives. Since Latex comes in many forms it's not entirely clear which form you're using but I assume you're mainly referring to latex prosthetics. Latex I think the most common alternative would be to use silicone. Silicone is a man-made alternative to the more natural latex, and it generally ...


9

If you would rather use it indoors, that's fine as long as you wear a mask. If you're doing a lot, consider one of the heavy-duty ones: You can generally buy these anywhere you can buy spray paint or airbrush supplies. Be aware that your lungs might not be the only place you don't want paint ending up when you're indoors - cover anything you want to remain ...


9

This can be done, but the difference can have more to do with the type of glass than the method. From personal experience, tempered glass is inherently stressed and is almost impossible to work with. Areas towards the necks of bottles have similar issues. I suggest fresh masonry bits for their cost effectivenss. Too slow can cause stress from the pressure ...


8

So I'm a big knitter and crocheter and a musician with tendinitis for the past 20 years. Aside from the standard advice (NSAIDs, massage, etc) there are a few things that you can do to mitigate the situation. First, make sure that the amount of pressure you're using is the bare minimum amount possible. It may actually take some time to retrain your hands, ...


8

Always wear safety glasses! (It's a good idea with any drilling, but especially when drilling through glass.) There are specialty bits made for drilling through glass that can be found at most hardware stores. A standard drill will work fine. Don't use a hammer drill! Keep your drill speed low (if it is variable) especially if you wind up using a diamond ...


8

As said by Tom, you should use a mask to spray indoor. It is quite convenient when you are alone but that does not protect your environment. Also don't forget that if you should be wearing a mask in a room, all the other breathing beings in that same room should do the same... An alternative (or complement) is a spray booth which will catch the particles ...


8

You could try fray check. These glues tend to be thinner, which would give you a less noticeable and stiff edge. They are usually clear, but may yellow over time. If that isn't strong enough, you could try fabric glue, which as the name suggests, is specifically made for bonding fabrics. You can also finish the back of your piece without glue! After ...


8

I think @matt's response is exactly correct, but I wanted to add a bit more to it. There are two concerns about inhaling dust--the size of the dust particle and the chemical composition of the particle. There are lots of articles on-line that talk about how dust inhalation causes problems, but I will summarize this one from the Canadian Centre of ...


8

Instead of securing the fabric with the scews, I'd let the fabric secure itself on the outer edge of the wood. The less holes you poke into a fabric, the stronger it is to withstand tearing or wearing out. Instead of a simple hem, you could roll and secure the fabric (light blue) around a cord or other thick material (dark blue) to create a bulge that is ...


7

A tile cutter with a diamond blade works to smooth the edges of glass. I bought one at a garage sale to cut slate tiles and found it also works to finish glass edges. Mine has a way to tilt the blade also. I first lightly run the glass edges at a 90 degree angle against the diamond saw blade, IE, with the blade straight up and down. Next I tilt the blade ...


7

By the sounds of your application, a table-top glass grinder is the right answer. I'm saying this from a couple assumptions: It sounds like you're making many of these and just want a nice edge to your mirrored glass. You probably want minimal effort to accomplish this, for now. You have not described the need to artistically embellish the edge of the ...


7

As far as I'm aware for BDSM purposes you want to get the melting point low enough to not burn the skin, but high enough for the recipient to have intense sensations. Paraffin and soy wax are common choices because their melting points (46 - 68 °C / 115 - 154 °F) are already lower than that of other kinds of wax. Skin irritation Stearic acid is used in many ...


6

While superglue is strong enough to seal many things, it does have an enemy: acetone. Acetone is able to break down superglue bonds. To get the superglue off of your shoe, try and use nail polish remover (that contains acetone). Be careful though, since acetone is known to be able to dry your hands quickly though. Using this should do the trick. Just ...


6

I will make a comparison with wood. Ever have a splinter before? They can hurt and bleed and become infected in some cases. Now imagine small microns of bone dust in your lungs. They can cause minute tissue scars inside you that you cannot repair. This is not because of the carving itself so much as the smoothing and finishing with other tools like sand ...


6

There are lots of links that describe toxic fumes from burning or laser-cutting acrylic. Apparently, the risk also applies to the molten plastic, as you would encounter with 3D printing or molding. According to Everything You Need To Know About Acrylic (PMMA): ...fumes from 3D printing with acrylic or from the molten material used during injection ...


5

Acetone is the well-rounded budget conscious option. Zizouz212's answer generally covers this. It is hardly the only option though. It largely depends on the material the glue is on well. When it comes to skin (not a material but certainly somewhere glue ends up) warm soapy water is certainly effective. How long you scrub or immerse depends on the amount ...


5

As with any repetitive strain injury (RSI), rest, moist-heat-then-ice, massage, compression, NSAIDs and, of course, physical therapy can all help. For me, I've generally found that plenty of aerobic exercise to increase circulation through tight sore muscles is what will fix/relieve RSI issues the most quickly for me. YMMV. The main problem is that this is a ...


5

The majority of the safety recommendations relate to the fact that this is a hot wire cutter. Use caution near the wire. It is hot and can burn you. Keep fingers and hands out of the way. (I was once stupidly holding the wire section of my hot wire cutter while chatting to another student, and the cutter got plugged in. I had an very straight burn across ...


5

Main precaution ; Do not touch it while it is hot. No vapors will come off the steel . What does A4 mean ? Your heating would be about right for forging. But for bending , try room temperature. It will bend very well unless you paid a premium for strain hardened bar. If you bend it extensively at room temperature it will harden. If you need to bend it more ,...


5

You would use a hand held diamond file. They are sold specifically for the purpose you are describing (fixing chipped articles). There are a number of articles and videos online which detail the process and specify which files to use (flat, rounded, etc.).


5

Your best bet would be to laminate the picture at a local print shop. That would seal whatever has gotten onto the paper behind an impermeable barrier of clean plastic. Barring that, you can probably get rid of most of the bacteria by exposing your drawing to ultraviolet light. UV light is used in many industries as a disinfectant. As for the amount of ...


5

Yes, there is still a risk, as the hazard is in the oil; as the oil dries, it emits heat (an exothermic reaction) which, if it's in a pile of other flammable objects--such as other oily rags, papers, etc--can cause them to combust. From the Wet Canvas forum (the thread also contains some personal experiences with combusting rags): Remember it is the ...


5

Another option is to needle felt the two together. You’ll need loose wool fiber (cat hair and dog hair also work great) and felting needles (very sharp, use with caution!). There’s lots of great tutorials on needle felting on the internet. Any sort of glue you try to use will be ineffective. Felting the two pieces together is simple and permanent, if you get ...


4

The "go-to" material for a lot of people is something that is inexpensive and easy to make using gelatin and glycerin (and sometimes additional ingredients). It can be used directly or foamed. You can make a big batch of the material and it will keep for quite a while. To use it, you melt as much as you need (including recycles from previous use)...


4

Yes, if you overheat it, most thermo-plastics will give off dangerous gases when heated above a certain temperature. For bending, you need somewhere between 100C - 170C (212°F - 338°F). Cast acrylic needs higher temperatures than extruded (due to the higher molecular weight), and thicker sheet need slightly higher temperature than thinner. But do ...


4

So, from my experience... Wrong? No. Basically, looking at the major art paint options I can't see any that, when combined, would result in a dangerous mix. Some, however, will mix a bit better together than others. Yes and no. The key to the cracking effect is difference in drying times, some paints dry faster than others and when you apply a fast drying ...


4

I am not an expert on this subject, by any means, but I can share the information that is available so that you can at least make a more informed decision yourself. Polymer clay, just like most other materials and chemicals, comes with an MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet). This sheet lists all the potential hazards and risks when using the material. All the ...


4

For my cross stitch work, I machine stitch the edges all around with a zigzag (preferably a three-step). If by hand, I use a scaled down version of a blanket stitch. For something that will be washed, I would make the stitches closer though not as close as a buttonhole stitch. As for worries about stitches coming loose, I have none. I learned as a youngster ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible