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12

These are called "canvas keys". The are shimmed into the corners of the canvas to maintain the tautness of the canvas. This generally happens only on machine-assembled frames, or on mass-produced frames that have low-quality inspection standards (for cost).


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From Understanding the difference canvas and linen: Canvas can mean different things to different people. In the context of painting, the word ‘canvas’ means a fabric used as a painting surface. The difference is that sometimes the canvas is made from cotton fibres and other times from linen fibres. Each material is worth looking at in more detail. ...


5

Since it's a plastic surface mediums made for use with acrylic paints might be your answer. There are varnishes and glazing mediums specifically made for acrylic painting. Both mediums start out clear. By tinting the mediums you will have control over the hue and value of the covering layer. The company Golden caries a line if varnish and glazing medium ...


5

You can staple it right at the outer edge of the frame instead of wrapping it over and stapling it at the back. You will still lose some of the canvas, though (if the canvas you are using has clean edges, not prone to tearing, it could take as little as 1 cm on each side). You may want to put some glue (PVA) at the edges of the canvas and where the staples ...


5

Stretching it properly on the right sized frame should be enough to remove the creases, no water required. Properly is: Procuring a support of the right dimensions. The original frame on which the work was painted would be the best. Centering the painting on the support, and tacking (stapling) the work to the frame at the midpoint of each edge. This will be ...


4

Buttons are made from a lot of different materials. Even plastic buttons are commonly made from half a dozen different kinds of plastic. Some of these are easy to glue and some are difficult. Weldbond sticks to a lot of stuff, but plastics are among the things it doesn't bond well to, especially some of the plastics some buttons are made from. So adhesion ...


4

You don't need an outer frame. Here is a way to go about it:


4

Canvas keys work by expanding the mitre joints at the corners of stretcher bars (see sketch below). As the canvas keys are driven into their recessed slots on the stretcher bars the canvas, which is fastened to the stretcher bars, slowly tightens. This action "depends" on the mitre joint of the stretcher bars not having been nailed or stapled together. If ...


4

Some pigments used in inks are UV sensitive and disappear rather quickly when exposed to sunlight, others remain unaffected. Having in mind the colours you need, make some research about which pigments are used to make your desired colours and which of them are UV sensitive and which are not. Check what water-based products are available on the market and ...


4

If it has a frame with glass, or you're not against putting it in such a frame, you may paint a layer of glass paint on the glass, instead of working directly on the canvas. If you ever regret your decision and you want the original art back, no harm is done.


4

There may be a number of techniques used: Traditional animations had a complex workflow involving hand-coloured xerographed outlines. Backgrounds were drawn separately and reused (even in multiple films), and individual frames weren't all drawn by the same people. A quote from the first link is instructive: A peg bar is an animation tool used in ...


3

I just sprinkle glitter on mine, while the paint (usually oil, but could be acrylic) is still wet. Shake it later so the loose bits fly off. When dry consider using hair spray as a first fix, then you can varnish if you wish.


3

No there are options. Being able to use canvas keys depends very much on having the right type of stretcher bars to work with. There are alternatives to help tighten a sagging canvas. One method to help with sagging canvases is to spray the back surface of the canvas with a light spray of water. As the water evaporates the moistened canvas fibres will ...


3

Because the canvas will have to endure a lot of tension and movement, especially when you work with large and rough gestures, and because canvas consists of fibres and has a lot of texture, using tape or putty won't work. You need hardware. In addition to Not The Face's answer, I suggest using thumbtacks. Make sure to stretch the canvas as much as you can ...


3

Staple gun or hammering finishing nails to the wall. How will it be presented after completion?


2

No, they are the same. But there are A LOT of different ready made canvases to choose from, prices ranging from pennies a square inch to tens of dollars per square inch. Price depends very much on materials and construction that went into building the pre-stretched canvas. Most important thing to know is what your own needs are as an artist. If you like to ...


2

I've used the clear gesso with pigments to create underpainting. Clear gesso mixed with acrylics can achieve a faux watercolor paint effect. (I found an example YouTube video here.) I personally did this a little differently. I mixed the clear gesso with the paint in a little cup and added a few drops of water. I dipped my brush in the paint and painted over ...


2

Just apply a thick layer of the canvas preparation, Gesso, over the existing paint. That will handle the absorbency issues and somewhat reduce the texture issue.


2

I would try sandpaper or even an environmentally friendly (low fume) paint stripper. Other solvents might also be a worth a try, for example mineral turps for oil. Another option is to use a heat gun to soften it and then scrape it off with a flat bladed scraper used for plastering. I did this today successfully, just don’t touch the blade as it gets ...


2

One option you have, considering that one of your tags is papier-mache, would be to cut cardboard of suitable thickness into shapes which could be stacked to form the contour you require. A resource directly related to this concept is software known as Flat Fab. Even though the software is directed to laser cutting of cardboard and other flat material, one ...


2

There are really two aspects to gluing the stones. One is the glue. The materials (canvas and stone) are different in almost every way and the canvas is not really a rigid surface, so you will get the most reliable, long-term attachment with a glue that remains flexible and adheres to both kinds of surfaces. E6000, as suggested by Lyssagal, was the first ...


2

Poster colors are water-soluble and can be reactivated. They are also relatively opaque, compared to other watercolours. But even though this type of paint might seem suitable for glazing and layering, you have to be careful when doing so, since the new colour can easily mix with the underlying one. Like gouache and watercolours, working with poster colours ...


2

You should stretch it on a frame. That way, in time, it will readjust itself. Do not force the stretching (which is something the word 'stretching' implies). Allow the canvas to flatten itself. With heavy creases you might have to stretch the canvas several times for all wrinkles to disappear. Be patient. A completely safe and archival way (no force ...


2

I believe the background was created by the use of randomly layering acrylic paints from darkest to lightest on the background canvas using something like sea sponges, waiting for each paint layer to dry, then adding the next lighter color. Turn the sponge frequently & use different sponges as well so that you get more random patterns all over. Given ...


1

From the picture is a little complicated to know precisely but this is my approach: 1.1. The paint needs to be "sticky" do not confuse with heaviness or density, to achieve this, You could use a 1 volume of "pyroxylin" by 1 1/2 volumes of acrylic ink. 1.2. Use some grain for texture, "+1 load" every coat or color. 1.3. Apply coat with creased ...


1

If you're working with a concrete wall, the best bet with minimal damage all around would be RebusB's suggestion on attaching it to a wood board. Stretch it prior to attaching so it's taught and staple down onto plywood - this will give you the flexibility of moving it from one place to another as you need and minimal damage to the concrete wall.


1

Are you planning on using the tiny paper type oil pastels or moving up to oil sticks to work on the canvas? Despite the approved answer I would hesitate to use spray fix on oil pastels and definitely not use it with oil sticks on canvas. The small oil pastels used for drawing on paper may not dry as fast as oil sticks since they need to stay soft in between ...


1

If you don't want the artwork destroyed, then yes. Any contact with unfixed pastel (oil or chalk) will smudge it. This includes contact through the plastic bags you're dropping the art into. An artist-grade, archival-quality spray fixative should cause minimal color changes to your drawing, and proper handling will prevent any health issues. In selecting ...


1

I've used iridescent acrylic medium, which contains titanium coated mica flakes (source:https://images.utrechtart.com/Content/pdf/experts_archive/history/HS_utrecht_guide.pdf) for producing a pearl-like shimmer. You can mix it in with other acrylic paints, or apply a thin layer over dry paint. The mica flakes are fine enough such that they don't interfere ...


1

If your diamond dust is being displaced by the force of the spray varnish, then I'd suggest either Applying the diamond dust to wet paint or Applying the diamond dust to the varnish before it dries and then varnishing over it again once it's dried.


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