10

There are green areas in the photo, although they are not bold. Maybe your solution would be not to fade but to juxtapose bold colors. Yet, if you want to fade, painting by layers will have a cleaner mix than painting in impasto (glaze a very thin blue over the yellow). Also you could use dots of each color next to each other for a vibrant optical blending (...


10

Before providing a way to test the oil painting is dry, it's useful to know how the drying process works and why it is important. How does oil paint dry (cure)? Oil Paint doesn’t really dry, rather it cures. The pigment is dispersed in oil (typically linseed) and generally contains a solvent (methylated/white spirit). The solvent evaporates away leaving ...


9

As long as the Painting isn’t recently painted, within 6-12 months, then there isn’t a general consensus and the answer is: It depends. The reason for the delay after the painting is finished is that it can take this long for the painting to fully 'dry'. In your case, this isn't a consideration. One of the biggest threats to your oil painting is the ...


9

So the golden rule when layering oil paint is to work lean to fat (or fat over lean). What does this actually mean? Lean paint is paint that is diluted with white-spirit or turpentine. It is 'watery', and dries quickly. Typically underpaintings are done in this way, as it's quick and easy to correct mistakes. As you then build up subsequent layers, use less ...


9

There are many things that can set apart great paints from others: working-qualities of the oil specific source of the oil chemical pigments pure-mineral pigments colorfastness of the pigments metals in the pigment consistency of pigment grain-size pigment density / fillers. Each of these can mean different things to the rest of the materials you ...


8

If using graphite make sure to spray a few coats of fixative over the graphite drawing prior to painting. What should I use instead? You could also try: charcoal Water color pencils diluted ink


8

Oil paint dries slowly and mixes well on canvas (A thin paint will stick to a thick paint). It also adds texture but shows brush strokes. You are going to want to work in a ventilated area. Acrylic dries very quickly and dries flat, diminishing brush stroke visibility. Once dried it remains flexible and can be painted over quite easily. When wet it is ...


7

Light, Air, AND Temperature. After restricting the air flow like by putting the palette into a container you can put it in the fridge or even the freezer for a longer period. Some painters immerse the working palette into a recipient of water in the fridge for the best air restriction, because it is oil based the paint is not altered and is workable within ...


7

Always buy the best you can afford. The answer can get complicated, but generally the lower priced brand use only cheap manufactured pigments and fill the tubes with cheapo filler, over diluting them . The same is true for "student grade" version of good enough brands like W & N. Almost always the cheaper paints are actually more expensive than quality ...


7

Generally speaking, acrylic is a cheaper and more forgiving medium to start with. As mentioned by other respondents, acrylic is fast-drying and can be painted over. You can also use acrylic media, such as glosses, gels, pastes, etc., to adjust the consistency and texture of acrylic paint. I personally use acrylic paste and gels to thicken the paint such that ...


7

Pure beeswax is compatible with oil paint and you can use it as a top coat or "varnish" on oil paints to provide a matte finish. There are also cold wax mediums and varnishes that you can use with oil paints. They are a mixture of solvent like mineral spirits or turps, pure beeswax, and resins, the same materials you use to make mediums and varnishes for ...


5

When I'm done painting, this is how I clean up. I've kept some brushes for years like this: Soak the brush in white spirit for a minute or so Gently massage the bristles to loosen the paint and make sure as much as possible is dissolved in the spirits Put a good dollop of liquid soap onto the bristles, and gently scrub into a lather with a bit of warm water ...


5

Cooking oil certainly isn't a direct substitute for linseed oil. Oils used for paint and treating wood are so called 'drying oils' this means that they naturally polymerise when exposed to air, forming a dry flexible material. All vegetable oils will do this to some extent but for something like sunflower oil it will take a very long time and you will end ...


5

There is no simple answer, it depends on many factors like the temperature of where you live, sun and wind exposure, the amount and type of oil, the thickness of the paint, the color pigment itself. Obviously, the more you wait the harder it will be, but within a week should be fine. White spirit is not recommended it will attack and unsaturate the color, ...


5

On one hand there is the general quality of the paint such as the formulation of the base, density and particle size of the pigment as well as the consistency of quality from one batch to the next. There is also the pigment itself. Traditional pigments can vary hugely in price depending on the source and although there are inexpensive synthetic equivalents ...


5

If you're working with oil paint? Nothing is needed! Paints on a palette will remain workable without any further interaction for a couple of days. Longer than this, consider putting some cling film carefully over the top. If the paints have gone a bit stiff when you come back to them, simply work them carefully with a bit of white spirit or turpentine to ...


5

Well, you can use graphite or charcoal pencils for drawing on canvas, but they should be sealed with a fixative or a very thin layer of gesso before applying oil over top of them. That will prevent any bleed as a result of blending with the paints. If you don't want to do that, then I would use paint, just very thin (thinned with thinner) and fine. Mind you,...


5

There is no standard quality ranking for artist oil paints, however, generally, they are sold as Professional, Artist or Student grade with different brands having their own names. Price also is usually an indicator. I think it is more useful to think of paint in terms of purity rather than quality. The top end manufacturers are pigment makers firstly, the ...


4

Oil paint dries because of air and light (UV), so if you want to slow down the drying process, put it in a dark place without ventilation. You probably want to cover it with something too, just to expose it even less to air.


4

The thing about the art store options is that they're being tested by the manufacturers for their impact on the longevity of the painting or color impact to the pigments, so I would divide my response into a couple of parts... Brush Cleaning? Sure, presuming that you're doing additional cleaning after. If you're looking to just store the brushes in the oil, ...


4

Since you tagged this as oil-paint, I assume that is your intended use. Actually, the BLO that is sold in art stores is the same stuff that is peddled in hardware stores, be they large or small. So you can use the BLO from the gallon cans for anything that you might use the BLO purchased from anywhere else. Edit: Note that not all linseed oil is "...


4

Believe it or not, oil paintings actually take years to fully dry. It is a good idea to avoid glass on an oil painting the first few years of it's life for that reason. Beyond that, it's perfectly fine to use glass. It does not harm the artwork. However, no matter what you're framing, you should never allow the glass to touch the artwork. Wikihow actually ...


4

I'll have to agree with the others that acrylic is much easier to use. I've done mostly watercolor and acrylic on all my pieces, and have figured out the basic rules to get the best results. But oil, the few times I've dabbled with it, has proved to be a little more difficult. It also requires more than just water to dip it in and clean it off. In fact, you ...


4

I am sure it's fine. It is undoubtedly primed with acrylic gesso; or rather, it is highly unlikely it was sized and primed in a traditional oil technique. In the old days, sizing (protecting the support--the painting surface--from the adverse effects of coming in contact with oils) and priming (painting the surface white for a brighter painting) were two ...


4

You can try, but first you will want to degrease the plastic with a little rubbing alcohol (and prime it). The paint will not dry quickly unless you add a siccative like China dryer to the oil to thin it out. That said, I doubt that your airbrush is designed for oil paints. If you do want to risk ruining and clogging it constantly, make sure to really make ...


4

As Catija implied, if your oil painting is less than 6 months old you shouldn’t do this. And if the oil paint is impasto (very thick) you should wait up to 18 months before varnishing. A very bad technique that would work is to varnish with a solvent-based varnish, let cure for 72 hours and then overcoat the varnish with a water-based varnish. Then you could ...


4

The most important thing is to keep your brushes clean and dry between uses. Use a mild soap and lukewarm water (marseille soap is my favorite) to clean your brushes after you have used them, whether acrylic or oil. Rinse them in warm water, flick the water out and then dip them in acetone. The acetone will dry out the oils, turps and waters, leaving your ...


4

Yes - Acrylic and oil paints create different effects on the canvas, they are blended differently, and they dry at much different speeds. Acrylic painting techniques are different styles of manipulating and working with polymer-based acrylic paints. These types of paint eliminate the need for turpentine and gestapo, and can be applied directly onto canvas. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible