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20

It's a seam ripper. You use it to pick up and cut stitches in a seam that you want to "unsew". To use it properly, poke the longer end under the stitch, then push it through so the U part cuts it. Repeat every few stitches, then use either your fingers or the tool to pull out the threads. To use it the quick & dirty way, pull apart the layers of ...


17

You have two options: Prettier - the Ladder Stitch, and Stronger - the Baseball Stitch. First, the Ladder Stitch. Quoting the linked site: First, poke your threaded and knotted needle through the bad side of one cloth, ensuring that the knot is on the inside of the plushie. Next, pass the needle partway through the good side of the other piece of ...


15

Sharpie might work, but will have some bleed on the fabric when applied that may cause the mark to spread farther than would be covered by the pins. Additionally, while you want something "permanent" right now, what happens if you lose the pins but still wish to wear the shirt? Instead of using a permanent marker, I would recommend getting a hand-sewing ...


14

Are you absolutely sure the upper thread is threaded correctly, especially through the tension control knob? (I would go ahead and re-thread the machine, since it's cheap to do.) Other things to make sure of (most of which you've already done, but just for completeness' sake): The presser foot is fully down (on many machines, the tension isn't engaged ...


13

Stitching lengths: 2mm is the short stitch length that should be used for lightweight fabrics, for satin stitching, and decorative stitching. 2.5 - 3mm is the average stitch length range that should be used for medium weight fabrics. 4 - 5mm is the long stitch length range that should be used for basting and topstitching. Stitches for ...


13

1). The decorative bow could be on an elastic band that is closing the bag. 2). The bow is attached to a pin that is holding the bag closed. 3). There is a drawstring inside the bag at the close. The bow is only attached to the top layer, not sewn through. 4). The maker attached little magnets inside the bag that keep it closed. However, it is entirely ...


12

Yes, what you need is called a blind stitch to create a blind hem… and it can definitely be sewn by hand. Of course, hemming pants while you are wearing them is a bit more difficult, and it will never look quite as finished without an iron. But in an emergency, this will work great and the stitches will remain virtually unseen. Start by folding your ...


11

It never hurts to take a machine that is new to you in for a servicing, because you don't really know how it's been treated, and what it may need. At that time, it's not a bad idea to talk to the person servicing the machine. Different models and brands of machines may need different work, and different usage levels and types of projects may require more ...


11

I would like to suggest something I was told while I was working on my ties. What you could do is to use some clear nail polish, not a lot, to stiffen the ends of the ribbon. That should prevent them from fraying at all. It is likely that you could use something like a super glue to accomplish the same thing. You don't need a lot so, while it will darken ...


10

In most cases satin ribbons are made from polyester or similar "plastic" fibers. This means you can use heat to melt the fibers together: quickly run the flame of a lighter along the fraying edge. My preferred technique is to hold the ribbon in one hand, close to the end, so that the end is more or less horizontal. (For wide ribbons, a slight 'U' bend ...


10

Most commercial flags are made out of nylon. It's lightweight, durable, and dyes well. Specifically, the flags on many sites are made from DuPont SolarMax™, which is supposed to be nicely color safe in the sun. For inside use, you should probably be fine with a ripstop style nylon. This heavyweight DuPont SolarMax™ nylon is the most popular and versatile ...


10

Most entry-level sewing machines should do fine for sewing apparel, and can even handle a few thicknesses of denim (reviews are good for this sort of info). I would recommend going for a well-known brand rather than e.g. a vintage secondhand machine. That way if you have any issues, it will be easier to get support at a local sewing shop, from the ...


10

I regularly reuse my own patterns, as I myself have a few favorites that have been incredibly helpful to me. I use the technique I was taught in a theatrical costuming class: When cutting the pattern out, cut closely around the outermost size lines (there is no need to be exact at this stage, but try not to leave huge chunks of tissue behind) Pin or weight ...


9

The theory behind stitch length is pretty straight forward. The shorter the stitches, the more will be packed into each inch of stitching, creating a tighter seam. The longer the stitches, the fewer within each inch, therefore, the looser the seam. Short equals tight; long equals loose. Another way to think about it is: short equals stronger and permanent, ...


9

The stitches that you typically see on commercial t-shirt seams are an overlock stitch, which typically requires a special type of sewing machine specifically for this purpose (e.g., a serger).


9

Based on your planned usage of the machine, it likely won't be an issue for you. The common usages of a zigzag stitch are to allow give in a seam for stretchy fabrics (which you can handle with the stretch stitch setting), to create buttonholes (not a case you described doing), and to secure edges against fraying (which you may encounter, but can compensate ...


8

Basic requirements For a basic sewing machine that does hems and maybe some simple garment sewing... I'd look for: Basic stitches - running stitch, zig zag, blind hem stitch Adjustable tension - to accommodate lighter fabrics Adjustable stitch length Reverse (almost all modern machines have it, it's just handy) Choices If you want to sew buttons you ...


8

I recommend that you ignore the depth of the V in your v-neck shirt and cut the square where you want it to be (allowing for seams, obviously). Then, using the cut-out material, you can use it as a modesty panel to fill in the space where the tip of the V is to make a full square neck. What you do with this notch is up to you. You can try to make it blend ...


8

You get the least visibility when you use the same colour of yarn as your fabric. But as a beginner, it will be easier when the yarn stands out from the fabric, which does make for the stitches to be seen a bit. I guess the blue line in the picture is the line to sew on, if so, sew on that line and not near it. The better the stitches are in one line, the ...


8

You have the right idea. Sewing near the edge but leaving the actual edge raw will achieve a frayed edge. Things to keep in mind: This will only work on a woven fabric, not a knit. Most importantly, not all edges will fray equally on a circle shape. Because of the nature of a woven fabric, the threads are horizontal and vertical. Certain places around the ...


8

To understand when to use backstitching, you need to understand the purpose of it in the first place. It's not just "a thing that is done," it is a technique to "lock" the stitches in place on a seam. To illustrate this for yourself, get some scrap fabric and stitch two pieces of it together along a straight edge. Backstitch at one end, and just stitch off ...


7

To prevent (actually: to minimise) fraying, you can use zig zag scissors known as pinking shears. And you can use non-woven interfacing. Make sure you choose a type that has a pre-glued side. You can iron it to fabric. It prevents fraying and deforming.


7

You need to stiffen the fibres so that the thread does not tear though them while you are sewing. Clear nail polish I ended up buying a small container and applied in all along the edges of the tie tail. About a 1/4 inch all around. After letting it dry it gave something for the thread to hold onto. Made it loads easier to get cleaner results.


7

The basic idea is always to have ideally all visible stitches at the back of the fabric. Common denominator is that in all single-layer parts of the seam only a few threads of the fabric are picked up or a short length of fabric is visible. For a single fold, the hem stich (German term "Hexenstich", will research the English term) that stitches against the ...


7

A traditional potholder quilt would use pre-assembled blocks, with the block edges finished (won't fray) and then sewn together to assemble the quilt. The blocks can be finished in one of several ways: either with strips of fabric, or woven tape; bringing the front fabric to the back and over-casting it to the backing; by using a knife edge ...


7

You can't sew fabric like that from normal flat fabric. If you have the fabric, you can sew it together as a pillow. But your question seems to be about making the fabric itself. To make fabric like that, you would need to weave it on a loom. (If you have never woven, my answer will make no sense at all.) Here's how to do it. Cast on a very sparse warp; ...


7

A company that makes them, Lindy Bop, calls them their "Ophelia" style dress and they have a similar one that's called "Sloane". It's a vintage style from the 50s - "Rockabilly swing". The description of the bodice they use in various places include: Sweetheart neckline with ruched satin inset a sweetheart neckline with turquoise ruched bust panel....


7

Waxed cotton has the weight and drape. Here's a wiki link https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waxed_cotton Another benefit to waxed cotton is its ability to "heal". Once punctured leather, pleather, and vinyl will keep that hole. Also waxed cotton would be great as your mockup so you can tailor and make adjustments.


7

I'd suggest you use leather glue to glue a patch from the inner side (with either leather or cloth - whatever suits the design of your jacket best). You can get creative with that and glue some logo or image instead of just a blunt patch (if so, you can do it on the outer side instead of the inner side). But from what I can visualise the leather is not only ...


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