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14

Plastic will melt and flow away from the iron leaving a hole. Cardboard is really just paper with air gaps between the glued layers so there's just a little bit of material to burn. A wooden stick is going to be solid wood. It doesn't melt and move out of the way - if anything the burned area of wood actually gets harder (and more brittle) as it turns to ...


13

Consider a clear-drying epoxy. Note that not all epoxies are equal. In a general sense they can bond different materials together with ease. Here is an earlier epoxy advertisement where they glued a car to a billboard with an epoxy resin. 1983 a visual stunt presentation was set up to show the strength of Araldite by gluing a yellow Ford Cortina to a ...


10

Wood glues are fine for balsa. While there are stronger glues, the added strength is usually unnecessary and strong enough should be sufficient. It is hard to generalize but "white" glues, like Elmers, are just PVA glues that are advertised as craft or general glues. There are also yellow PVA glues, which Elmers also makes (and the one I generally ...


9

If cost control is important to you, and if you have access to an ink-jet printer instead of a laser, then you might want to try using the left over wax backing sheets from standard printable mailing labels like Avery 5160. The ink jet ink doesn't dry as quickly as normal on the waxed paper, so right after printing, you can flip the paper over and press ...


9

Absolutely. An Elmer's-style wood glue (polyvinyl acetate (PVA), generically known as carpenter's interior wood glue) is an inexpensive glue which is quite effective for holding balsa wood together. It does not take a lot of wood glue to make a good bond. In fact, too much glue will create a weak joint, so use it sparingly (how to use). If you already have ...


9

Preparation As the wood dries, it shrinks. You'll likely get big splits and cracks. The rule of thumb for a board (vs. a round) is a year of drying per inch of thickness. Wood dries faster through the end grain but also tends to develop splits and cracks as a result because of the uneven shrinkage (but has less tendency to warp in that orientation). You ...


8

2-part epoxy is my usual recommendation when it comes to mating different kinds of materials together. That is usually one of the selling points. I would caution with the use of Gorilla Glue for this. While is might be a viable choice you need to be careful of its expansion properties. If you do try to use it make sure you clamp appropriately and clean any ...


8

DeAngelis, In my personal experience, I have had the most success with this type of project by applying a water-based stain first, followed by the acrylics, and lastly the sealer coat. You must ensure that the stain you are using is water-based, as opposed to oil-based in order for the acrylics to properly set and adhere. In your order of operations, ...


8

Instead of securing the fabric with the scews, I'd let the fabric secure itself on the outer edge of the wood. The less holes you poke into a fabric, the stronger it is to withstand tearing or wearing out. Instead of a simple hem, you could roll and secure the fabric (light blue) around a cord or other thick material (dark blue) to create a bulge that is ...


8

Painting by immersion would be fairly easy, but drying would be harder. Industrially I suspect they'd be kept moving with warm air. They'd be too expensive for this quantity, and come in sets of too many colours, but some wooden balls are available dyed. If the ones you can get are pale wood, this may be an option, and drying would be more even than with ...


7

You could cut up an old bike tire. Cut off the sides, and you have a nice strip of actual tire tread. There are lots of different sizes of bike wheel, so you can customize the depth of the tread by choosing between road tire (skinny tire, shallow tread), off-road (much wider tire and deeper, bumpier tread), hybrids (a cross between road and off-road) and ...


6

Your question is limited by not having an indication of the resources available to you. One of the better tools would be a scroll saw, often called a jig saw. The tabletop versions are well suited to light duty cuts such as popsicle sticks. Another suitable tool, somewhat unwieldy, is the rotary hobby tool, often called a dremel tool, from the brand name ...


6

My bachelor's degree was in Fine Arts, with a focus on wood block printing. The technique I was taught involved marking the center line on the back of the leading edge of the paper. (The end that will feed into the press first.) On the press, lay out a registration paper that clearly marks the location of the block, a corresponding center line, and one or ...


6

The short answer is the wood is shrinking as it loses moisture. Because you've used two fastening points across the width of a top board, one or more of those top boards may split as it continues to shrink. Accommodating this sort of change in dimension (which continues to happen seasonally, even when the wood has fully "dried") is one of the classic ...


6

You would want a flexible adhesive, as the rubber soles will have some movement throughout its thickness. A good quality contact cement will bond well with both the rubber and with the wood, as long as you have a clean smooth surface on the wood. The rubber should also be cleaned with a solvent such as denatured alcohol or acetone, to ensure there is no ...


6

While I've voted for the answer suggesting bike tyres, here are some alternatives: There are vinyl products that can be painted on (or dipped, but painting is better in this case). A couple of coats of black Plasti-dip, the brand I have here, would work nicely. Cylindrical pieces of black latex of the right sort of size are available - drysuit replacement ...


5

Not sure if you want to hear this but this is better handled before finishing as supposed to mitigating after the fact. Either way I think you need to sand the roughness out you have first then do something to prepare the edges for finishing. In your case finishing would be painting. Preparing Plywood Edges Plywood surfaces are usually finish ready. That is ...


5

When using a water based paint, you will for certain cause the grain to raise and funny things that look like tear-out on the edges. To avoid this, before painting, I sand, then intentionally raise the grain with water, i.e. I paint it with water. Then I sand again to remove the raised grain and the tear-out. Finally I paint it with pigmented paint - in ...


5

Epoxies are the essential answer to your question. Since you are affixing two materials that can expand or contract quote a bit, you need to choose an epoxy that will not shrink and risk cracking the glass. The wood should be ok. From here, the answer would turn into a bevy of brand recommendations. I think you should look for what is available to you, ...


5

The rubber cement should just peel off the wood with gentle rubbing, provided it is dry. Using a piece of soft sticky rubber, and there are special rubber erasers specifically for picking up rubber cement, will help. Some shoes have gummy soles that are a similar material. The use of rubbing alcohol may help remove any remaining residue but do not use it ...


5

The toner transfer method of transferring an image onto a PCB should also work on wood. Basically you laser print (a mirror image if you need to work from the front) on suitable paper (I've done this with inkjet glossy photo paper), then iron onto the material, and you get a nice clean black image. You're limited by the size of the print you can make, or ...


5

Methylene blue is a very effective water-soluble blue dye and you can buy it on amazon quite cheaply (the pack at that link is probably enough to dye a table and chairs). That might do the trick. It's also used for treating fish in tanks, so is quite benign. The question becomes one of whether the water raises the grain too much given that the dyed layer is ...


5

After light sanding, reinforce the flat black with a little black paint, then seal the entire block in a clear coat to make it more durable. Alternatively, replace the black with a coat of burnt umber colored paint to match the interior of the laser cut symbol (kanji?).


5

You could take inspiration from old suitcases: these used either fabric (woven linen or cotton), or paper. (I actually suspect that they used bookbinding paper/cloth, more on that later.) Reasonably sturdy paper would be easiest to handle - patterned wrapping paper from a craft store, maybe, or even a piece of wallpaper. Fabric can be tricky (stretching, ...


5

I think it's hard to judge the real difference between the paintings your nephew made and the example of the goal he has in mind: the first are taken in what seems a yellowish light, while the second is colour corrected (at least, it seems to have a proper white balance set) and taken in bright light. Assuming both the eyes of the giraffe and the fur on the ...


4

Jigsaw is a poor choice of tool for this given the size of the finished product and that it is a roughing tool more designed for cutting sheet goods. Tools to consider Bandsaw If the polyhedron was a little larger and your valued the tolerance of the finished product I would most certainly suggest the bandsaw as you can use a mitre slide and a custom ...


4

Magnets are notoriously glue-resistant. There are sticky soft magnets used e.g. for refrigerator magnets, which would kinda work on the glue front, but they are pathetically weak. You could try two-ingredient epoxy for other magnets; it tends to stick really well to pretty much everything and if it won't, you can practically encase anything with it. But I ...


4

Look for clear epoxies, sometimes sold for encapsulating. They'll stick fairly well to both materials, though presumably not as well as epoxy sold as glue. You have a lot of contact area so the bond will be strong anyway. A two part epoxy should be quite cheap - if you can get an appropriate size pack, and I'd expect curing over a few hours though you ...


4

There's a technique called "toner transfer" for making printed circuit board masks on copper. It should work onto wood as well. There are a few versions so you should google. What I did was take inkjet photo paper, and mirror image print with a laser printer. Then flip onto the desired substrate and iron. I suggest testing with offcuts and cheap photo ...


4

The properties of the wood, especially its density will have a significant effect on the tone of the instrument but there is quite a wide variety used as well as various laminates. Of critical importance is the stability of the wood as even small amounts of warping can seriously affect play-ability, this is especially the case with the neck which needs to ...


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