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8

I think @matt's response is exactly correct, but I wanted to add a bit more to it. There are two concerns about inhaling dust--the size of the dust particle and the chemical composition of the particle. There are lots of articles on-line that talk about how dust inhalation causes problems, but I will summarize this one from the Canadian Centre of ...


6

I will make a comparison with wood. Ever have a splinter before? They can hurt and bleed and become infected in some cases. Now imagine small microns of bone dust in your lungs. They can cause minute tissue scars inside you that you cannot repair. This is not because of the carving itself so much as the smoothing and finishing with other tools like sand ...


2

My husband is in a large hospital, with serious lung damage, and he has been cutting (deceased) cattle bones extensively. Including woods and Red Cedar. These doctors are having a difficult time wrapping their heads around the idea that it could be caused by an 8 year buildup of bone dust, using no mask of any kind. Both lungs are collapsed now, and air is ...


1

Any bones which are obviously clean and free form any residual soft tissue shouldn't be too much of a problem. With skulls you obviously have more cavities to work about but if the outer surface is clean when you find it it is reasonable to amuse that the interior is too. Once the bones are cleaned of any soil etc a wash with dilute hydrogen peroxide ...


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