12

Consider a clear-drying epoxy. Note that not all epoxies are equal. In a general sense they can bond different materials together with ease. Here is an earlier epoxy advertisement where they glued a car to a billboard with an epoxy resin. 1983 a visual stunt presentation was set up to show the strength of Araldite by gluing a yellow Ford Cortina to a ...


11

India ink has only three ingredients: lampblack, water and gelatin or shellac as a binder(in fact, traditional India ink doesn't even contain this), with shellac being much more common. As you've guessed, this means that the clear liquid on top is probably a mixture of shellac and water. Shellac can be found easily online (if you can't find it in person) ...


8

If you would rather use it indoors, that's fine as long as you wear a mask. If you're doing a lot, consider one of the heavy-duty ones: You can generally buy these anywhere you can buy spray paint or airbrush supplies. Be aware that your lungs might not be the only place you don't want paint ending up when you're indoors - cover anything you want to remain ...


8

Dipping your brush into water isn't going to do anything other than get your brush wet. To actually clean a brush, you need physical agitation, and I don't mean "swish it around in the water jar a few times" agitation, but "mash it back and forth against your other hand while holding it under running water" agitation. Use some paint brush soap (or plain old ...


8

Oil paint dries slowly and mixes well on canvas (A thin paint will stick to a thick paint). It also adds texture but shows brush strokes. You are going to want to work in a ventilated area. Acrylic dries very quickly and dries flat, diminishing brush stroke visibility. Once dried it remains flexible and can be painted over quite easily. When wet it is ...


8

DeAngelis, In my personal experience, I have had the most success with this type of project by applying a water-based stain first, followed by the acrylics, and lastly the sealer coat. You must ensure that the stain you are using is water-based, as opposed to oil-based in order for the acrylics to properly set and adhere. In your order of operations, ...


7

Generally speaking, acrylic is a cheaper and more forgiving medium to start with. As mentioned by other respondents, acrylic is fast-drying and can be painted over. You can also use acrylic media, such as glosses, gels, pastes, etc., to adjust the consistency and texture of acrylic paint. I personally use acrylic paste and gels to thicken the paint such that ...


7

Clean them fast. Acryclic paint dries quickly, so it's important to clean your paintbrushes as soon as possible after you've finished using them, so that the paint doesn't get the chance to start drying and hardening on the brush. Massage the bristles thoroughly. Don't just dip the paintbrush into water and wiggle it around, and don't leave it standing in a ...


7

As said by Tom, you should use a mask to spray indoor. It is quite convenient when you are alone but that does not protect your environment. Also don't forget that if you should be wearing a mask in a room, all the other breathing beings in that same room should do the same... An alternative (or complement) is a spray booth which will catch the particles ...


7

Paint is a chemical with a blend of several characteristics. Two of those characteristics are: - Carrying a pigment (color) - Sticking to a surface (glue) A 50/50 mix would reduce the binder (glue) in the paint to half of what it was when it came out of the tube. If you were painting on paper or a medium that absorbed the paint you might get away with 50/50....


7

In short: No, you cannot make an effective primer out of paint. Primer is not just "paint without pigment," and the purpose of it isn't as a base coat; the purpose of primer is to prepare your surface to accept your paint. Some surfaces are too porous to take paint properly (wood, masonry), other may have issues with the paint adhering properly (plastic, ...


7

There's painters tape designed to seal much better with latex paint (e.g., Frogtape); it has a material that sucks up water and gels on contact so water-based paint can't flow past the edge. However, it's designed to work with smooth surfaces. On a rough surface like concrete, high spots keep any kind of tape from making good contact with low spots. To get ...


6

I would personally paint it separately from the original drawing, for a few reasons: I find that if I paint over pencil using acrylics, either the pencil lines become completely obscured by the paint such that I can no longer see fine details (such as shading), or for thinner/lighter colored paints (such as yellow), the graphite mixes in with the paint and ...


5

According to Mayer, that is water, shellac and borax. Although @walrus answered your question perfectly, I would like to address the other issue: where to find a painting medium that isn’t a varnish. If you are really interested in painting, then I must recommend that you treat yourself to a recent edition of The Artist’s Handbook by Ralph Mayer. You can ...


4

Look for clear epoxies, sometimes sold for encapsulating. They'll stick fairly well to both materials, though presumably not as well as epoxy sold as glue. You have a lot of contact area so the bond will be strong anyway. A two part epoxy should be quite cheap - if you can get an appropriate size pack, and I'd expect curing over a few hours though you ...


4

It depends on the synthetic brush that is available. Generally speaking, pony hair brushes are often used in schools since they are inexpensive, yet strong and soft. However, they do not retain the shape of the brush well when wet. Synthetic brushes on the other hand can be both well suited and terrible for painting with watercolors depending on the quality (...


4

I'll have to agree with the others that acrylic is much easier to use. I've done mostly watercolor and acrylic on all my pieces, and have figured out the basic rules to get the best results. But oil, the few times I've dabbled with it, has proved to be a little more difficult. It also requires more than just water to dip it in and clean it off. In fact, you ...


4

I am sure it's fine. It is undoubtedly primed with acrylic gesso; or rather, it is highly unlikely it was sized and primed in a traditional oil technique. In the old days, sizing (protecting the support--the painting surface--from the adverse effects of coming in contact with oils) and priming (painting the surface white for a brighter painting) were two ...


4

In my experiments so far I am having to go over each line several times to stop the background colour from showing through the acrylic. Even when the background is only white. This is probably caused by the quality of your paint. Pigments are usually the most expensive ingredient in any paint, so the cheaper the paint, the less pigments are in it. In order ...


4

As Catija implied, if your oil painting is less than 6 months old you shouldn’t do this. And if the oil paint is impasto (very thick) you should wait up to 18 months before varnishing. A very bad technique that would work is to varnish with a solvent-based varnish, let cure for 72 hours and then overcoat the varnish with a water-based varnish. Then you could ...


4

The most important thing is to keep your brushes clean and dry between uses. Use a mild soap and lukewarm water (marseille soap is my favorite) to clean your brushes after you have used them, whether acrylic or oil. Rinse them in warm water, flick the water out and then dip them in acetone. The acetone will dry out the oils, turps and waters, leaving your ...


4

Yes - Acrylic and oil paints create different effects on the canvas, they are blended differently, and they dry at much different speeds. Acrylic painting techniques are different styles of manipulating and working with polymer-based acrylic paints. These types of paint eliminate the need for turpentine and gestapo, and can be applied directly onto canvas. ...


4

Well, oil paints will be smoother, yes, but you need to know a few things about how it all works, or you will make mistakes. Oil paint from Van Gogh uses linseed oil. To make a wash, you would add thinner, classically turpentine. The thinner will dry the oil faster, and probably be more like watercolors. Poppyseed is a slow drying oil, and will eventually ...


4

That is called a vignette. Basically it is a soft blend of the dark edge that frames the outside of a picture (or any image like a photo or movie frame) into the outer areas of the front face. Here I would say they used a rag painting technique. Apply the black paint along the outside edges of the board and along the bevel or rounded edge of the outer face ...


4

I don't think anything is wrong with your paints. I have experienced it as well at times, even though I rarely work with acrylics. Acrylic paints go through different stages when drying, slowly forcing all of their 'volatiles' (water and co-solvents) out. But even after drying it will hold a relatively large amount of water, that can still increase and ...


4

Citadel paints are essentially just acrylic paints. If you're not sure you want to make the investment yet, you can use any standard craft-grade acrylic paint while you practice; I'd recommend investing in a flow medium to help prevent obscuring the small details in your miniatures, and not starting with any valued ones. (Dollar store plastic army men are a ...


4

To get a kind of burnt umber, I think (I can't test it now) you need around 3 parts black, 3 parts red, 1 part blue and 1 part yellow. Let's assume the first picture I found googling for fur is the kind of reference you have: For painting fur, and especially to get a warm glow in your painting, I suggest painting a layer of red (with yellow mixed in as ...


4

I see several probable problems here: You use the wrong "primary" colors The quality of your paints might be low You try to replicate a certain pigment without actually using this pigment Let's look at this problem from the bottom up (from short to long): Wrong pigment Burnt umber is a certain pigment. It's made out of actual brown earth (I think it ...


4

As Flora stated, if you try to put acrylic on top of the graphite drawing, the graphite is going to smear into the paint, and it is to have streaks of graphite into the paint. Causing it to not have a solid color. Also as well, depending on what paper it is, it can become wrinkled or start seeping through the back of the paper. Unless you have paper ...


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