9

An alternative is to travel with watercolour pencils. I have recently started to use them, and the blending solvent is water (obviously!). The pencils can be used dry—like normal colored pencils—or they can be applied "wet" to get the desired watercolor effect. In wet application, the artist first lays down the dry pigment and then follows up with ...


9

PrismaColor has a colorless blender pencil. Further, you could layer colours (start with the darkest) and use a (near) white pencil to burnish the colours. Make sure the tip of your pencil is sharp and apply the colour in small circular motions to get an even result.


6

A common technique for pencil blending is to use either a colorless blender pencil (they make one for this brand) or to use solvents to blend, normally something like Mona Lisa odorless mineral spirits. For blending pencils, I'm pretty sure the Artist's Loft line is wax based and so the blenders for Prismacolor should also work. The thing to remember with ...


4

It is possible to blend using markers, though like any new medium it can take some practice as well as depend on the type of marker you're using. Water-based markers Blending water-based markers requires little to no additional special equipment, just some water and a way to apply it. As you mention experience with watercolors, this may feel fairly ...


4

Possibilities for blending depend on the extent and/or stylistic appearance of the blending you want to achieve. You can blend mechanically by using readily available tools that are small and lightweight: Your fingers, bare or wrapped with a small cloth or tissue, are always with you. Blending stumps or tortillions allow more precise blending than with ...


3

I'm not sure why it is lightening: is the paper showing? Does the paper have enough 'tooth' or grip to begin with? How hard are you pressing into the paper and pastel? I've found gentle pressure with fingertip is enough. With softer (more expensive pastels) they tend to be the easiest to blend. If you have not tried a high-quality pastel like Schminke, then ...


2

You can also use different grades of pencils to change the tone of the work - also known as blending (an introduction to art techniques, glossary). To accomplish this sort of blending you use different pencil grades. The best example of shading and tone transition that I've seen is in The Art of Pencil Drawing, by Gene Franks. He uses an H, F, HB, B, 3B,...


1

Baby oil/mineral oil will never dry by evaporation like turpentine or mineral spirits ( AKA naptha , VM & P). It will not polymerize like boiled linseed oil or plain linseed oil. It may be drawn into the paper or canvas which could appear to be drying.


1

It is very hard to blend colors with markers and you can't use normal paper for it because on rough paper marker spreads so you need a proper sketch paper.


1

I think the origins lie in many places. In photograms and photocompositing, each image component is burned-in over the initially white surface and the edges can be blended by using to umbra of the shadow of the hands or stencil controlling the burn. Blending tones is an important technique in drawing with pastels. I think a lot of the blending tools come ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible