13

The distinction between the crafts are the tools used and how many stitches are held at the same time. Crochet is done with a single hooked needle and typically only a few stitches are held at one time before being crocheted off. Knitting is done with two or more needles, and rows of stitches are held open before being knitted off. Afghan/Tunisian ...


13

This question cannot really be answered. And the answer to why is both easy and complex. TL;DR: Start with one kind of needles, it doesn't really matter which kind, preferably one you can borrow, or some cheap ones, and decide after that if it feels right or not. Like someone already said, knitting needles are made of many different materials, the most ...


12

Non-metal circular knitting needles (wood or bamboo) are also available. This is an example of bamboo needles with a plastic cord connecting them:


10

Yarn Bowl This is the easiest suggestion I can think of. You just need a bowl or bowl like object with a hole or path for the yarn to come out. The hole is large enough for the yarn but small enough to stop the ball from moving around. The weight of the bowl is important as well since you will be pulling on it. Having it close to yourself would help that ...


9

From the image you've shown it looks like you're on the first row of knitting after casting on, and it also looks like you've used a loop (a.k.a. backwards loop) cast-on method. It's common to get an ever-increasing amount of slack on the first row when using this kind of cast-on. A loop cast-on is easy to do, but hard to do well because the tension used ...


9

It doesn't matter whether the hat was made with knit or crochet. Suppose it has wool fiber content, or unknown fiber content. If unknown, we must assume it has some wool in it, to play it safe. Premeasuring (in preparation for blocking). Turn the hat inside out and lay it out flat on a table. Measure the half-circumference of the hat by measuring the ...


9

No, it almost certainly will not scale to fit you appropriately. But it could work with some reasonably simple adjustments. Explanation In general, garments for babies and toddlers have shorter arms and shorter torso-length compared to the chest circumference than garments for adults. They sometimes also have a wider neck opening, and the size of the arm ...


9

I personally only use circular knitting needles. To work flat on circular needles, you do not need to do anything special. Just turn them around when you reach the end of your row, as you would normally, never join. If you think of it as two separate needles with a string holding them together, it may be easier to imagine how it works. I believe there are ...


8

I have a couple suggestions. If you knit in the French Method, try the German Method. If you knit in the German Method, try the French Method. Try a peg loom knitting. Or even machine knit. Else Weave & Sew, an entirely new topic. Knitting with the yarn in the hand opposite the working needle (i.e. the left hand if the knitter is right-handed) is ...


8

The finger positioning—actually the way the yarn loops around the fingers—controls the overall tension of the yarn. Think of it like the path the thread takes on a sewing machine—all those ups, downs and arounds between the thread spool and the needle to make a nice even stitch on the fabric. Fortunately the yarn path around the fingers is much more ...


8

What you need to do is put your yarn in a container of some sort. It should be wide enough that the yarn can roll around a bit (don't want it to rub hard against the sides) and deep enough that the yarn can't easily jump out, but other than that the sky's the limit. Containers I've used and/or heard about include: yarn bowls baskets (be careful with wicker, ...


8

Getting a circular cast-on up and running can indeed be tricky. Fortunately, there are several techniques that can help. Use a sturdy cast-on The long-tail cast-on is a good one for this as it basically includes the first row of knitting. Be careful if you need stretch, though. Add some weight to the cast-on This can be done by putting some stitch markers ...


8

This pattern is done in moss stitch/seed stitch, which are two names for the same stitch. There are plenty of resources on line for learning it, but it is really very simple: Cast on an odd number of stitches (the odd number is really important) Each row will be worked the same--start knit 1, purl 1, and repeat to the end of the row Because you cast on ...


8

Our Wiki answer: background information Trust me when I say realistically there's not alot of difference between knitting a 4" by 4" square and a metre by a meter cot blanket. Size of project is no indication of skill. Typically a good knitter progresses from plain items to fancy. Shawls are definite "I've made it as a knitter" items, & socks can be ...


8

As I understand it, the instruction offers 2 different sizes: Cast on 136 stitches if you want the pattern to repeat 4 times Cast on 170 stitches if you want the pattern to repeat 5 times The pattern itself has 34 stitches. 34 x 4 = 136 34 x 5 = 170 When the instruction says "cast-on and join, then work bottom border..." it means "Choose one of the given ...


8

Several suggestions: Knit a matching strip in a thinner yarn at a tighter gauge. Sew the strip onto the stocking after stitching letters onto it. That way you have more stitches per inch, so you can fit more letters in using duplicate stitch. Since the letters will be shorter, arrange them diagonally so they don't look lost in the middle of that tall strip. ...


7

Seam. The shoulders of a sweater are a high-stress area; the entire weight of the sweater hangs from them. A nice, solid seam gives a sturdy structure for that hanging. A graft - which is designed to be stretchy, just like the main fabric of the sweater - can result in droopy shoulders and stretched necklines. The excellent Techknitter wrote an illustrated ...


7

There are a number of non-nickel options available, though the good ones tend to be more expensive than the mainstream options and the inexpensive ones of poorer quality. The most established options: Signature Needle Arts makes aluminum needles. These are very good (sharp points, flexible cables), but pricey and only available online. Boye also makes ...


7

One piece of advice I've seen consistently in articles and videos on this subject is to make whatever knitting technique you use highly efficient. You want to make your movements as small as possible. The other thing you'll want to do is try to use pair the yarn fiber/type you're using with a needle material that will allow you to knit with relative ease. ...


7

So, in the meantime, I'm trying something a bit different... It's not the neatest sewing job, but I've managed to sew the strands together, doing a basic up and down through the middle (with the strands overlapping each other) and then looping over and under each side to hold it together on the sides as well. At least this way, there's no big knot and it ...


7

Yes. Assuming you still intend to work in the round, you'll need a stitch marker for the start of the row. You'll need to ironicly alternate between plain and purl each row. Otherwise you'll just get stocking stitch. If you intend to work flat which given the pattern is garter it probably is. I would recommend cables over DPNs.


7

Option 1: yarn over (small circle) A yarn over generally works well. Do remember to reduce afterwards, so your stitch count stays the same. In your example that would be: k13, yo, k2tog, k12 Knit the next row normally. Treat the yarn over as if it was a normal stitch. Option 2: double yarn over (larger circle) If you want a bigger buttonhole, it is ...


6

This question is difficult to answer without knowing exactly what your finished unstarched piece looks like. Even with a lot of "extra" stitches in each row you should be able to eventually create a flat piece. I haven't made snowflakes in years so I don't remember the exact process but if I were to do one today I would probably do something like this: Wet ...


6

I started knitting last winter, and have since made about a million hats. In my experience, wooden/bamboo knitting needles are great for beginners because they are not quite as a smooth and slick as metal knitting needles. Metal knitting needles allow you to knit faster, but also make it easier to drop stitches. Additionally, both wooden/bamboo and plastic ...


6

There are a lot of pros and cons to both methods of placing beads into your knitting, but when looking only at stability there is a difference between prestrung and placed beads. Having used both methods, I find the placed beads stay precisely where you put them whereas the prestrung beads can slip. When you place a bead you put it on precisely the stitch ...


6

In addition to being extremely insulative, wool is ideal for something like a coffee cozy because it is stable in the presence of a fairly high degree of applied heat, it is un-meltable, and it has a very high combustion point. For a practical example of wool’s ability to withstand heat, when pressing wool, the recommended iron setting is 148 °C (300 °F), ...


6

As mentioned in 111's answer, a blanket stitch is not a knitting technique to create blankets. The biggest risk in your plan is time. Babies often decide they want to see the world before doctors decide it's time for their birth. You should finish the blanket at least 2 - 3 weeks before the scheduled date. If you are quick and comfortable learning knitting,...


6

When you have a row of slipped stitches that are too tight to fit back onto the original needle, you can pick them up on a different needle, such as: Use a much smaller knitting needle. Eg, if you knitted originally on US size 8 needles (5.0 mm), use a US size 4 (3.5 mm) or smaller needle to pick the stitches up. The smaller needle should fit easily through ...


5

Superwash single is a somewhat tough one, yes. In those case, I usually start ten or so stitches before I change the yarn, I use the same technique as when doing jacquard to have the new yarn follow in the back of the work, I knit one stitch with both yarns, and knitting with the new yarn, I have the old yarn follow the stitches on the back for like ten ...


5

It's very true, as BSMP says, that using small movements is helpful. Here are some additional ideas: Make sure your fingers and hands don't have unnecessary tension. To achieve this, it can be helpful to ensure you are in a warm enough room that your hands aren't cold. If your left index finger is stretched out straight in order to achieve the tension ...


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