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30

Punch it Given the size of the holes you are doing this might not seem like useful advice but I would bet that this is what the artist in the picture did, as those are not perfect circles. Outside of this you could use a small punch to get a perfect circle. The way you get that to work is put a lot of paper (or some other thick material) underneath so that ...


22

Watercolor paper is, normally, quite a bit heavier and made from cotton. Basic watercolor paper, 140lb, is okay for practice and will tend to buckle unless stretched. The expensive 300lb paper is where professionals tend to land. In any case, the paint pools and absorbs differently than normal paper, and gives you options around blending, washes, etc. that ...


21

You will need to rest the point of the compass onto some other object first i.e. one that won't damage the paper. Some sort of disc A felt or rubber disc comes to mind. Something thin with enough friction so that the point and disc won't move about. You could also just take a cut of eraser and jab it on the point as well. This has a small disadvantage ...


19

Use SprayMount, or similar - it is formulated for exactly this purpose: fixing paper to cardboard. What you do is place your artwork face down on a piece of newspaper, spray a single, thin coat on the back, then place it onto the cardboard. It dries almost instantly, so there is no wrinkling, while still giving very good, invisible adhesion. There are some ...


15

You can use the 3-4-5 method of creating right angles. Begin with a construction line and mark a zero point and a 3 point. Make a mark. Notice that I'm not using units of measure. You can use millimeters (preferred) or inches or anything in between. Draw from the zero point at a right angle as closely as possible. Measure from the zero point to a 4 point. ...


14

A big factor to this would be to make sure your cuts are straight and not at an angle. If your cuts meet on top but are not completely vertical then a tuft would appear on the bottom of the paper, for example. This can be hard to work with since the blade of a craft knife is already at an angle. This leads into one possible solution. Depending on what you ...


14

Using scissors, as you have pictured, would be a contributing factor here. Using a craft knife or something similar would most certainly be the go-to tool. It is important to try to do the cutting in one motion - to not lift the blade from the paper and, if possible, not change the pressure you are exerting on the scissors. So if you were cutting this on a ...


14

tl;dr: tea! Yup, that's right, good ole' Lipton (or whatever other type of black tea you happen to have on hand). Diluted coffee can also work, but will smell like, well, coffee-stained paper. Note that this shouldn't be used on inkjet printouts, as inkjet ink isn't waterproof. So I would suggest printing out the master map (in black and white) and heading ...


13

The weight is the weight of a ream (500 sheets) in the unit of uncut size, which varies with the stock type See Here. A more consistent measure of paper weight is the grams per sq metre value (gsm) which is what it says, the mass of 1 square metre of the paper, which is the area density of the paper.


13

TL;DR: Generally speaking, printer paper is not designed to last long, and is intended to hold ink rather than graphite, charcoal, paint, etc. The same is more or less true of notebook paper. Printer and notebook paper have very little tooth (roughness); lack weight (i.e., the sheets are thin); and have relatively high acid content, which means they will ...


13

We make beer. We occasionally make labels for that beer. The easiest, best cheapest way to attach the labels is... ready for this... you sure??? Milk. Don't know why, don't ask why. It works. You won't be able to wash the bottles without the label coming off but if you're brewing, by the time you're washing the bottle, you probably want the label to ...


11

I have a small project where I make name blocks for kids. I basically glue some paper to a painted 2x4 (craft paper, wallpaper samples... I reuse what ever I find). I had a similar problem. No matter what paper I was using. My process involves using Mod Podge as my adhesive agent. What I do now to try and stop the wrinkles is hang the paper from a line or ...


11

It really does depend on how big the circle is. For tiny circles I recommend not using the knife at all. Find a pair of compasses (or, in a pinch, a dried-up pen or sharp pencil will do), and use that to punch a hole in the paper. Of course, you can also use the knife in much the same way, by poking the hole with the tip of the knife. Note that this ...


11

To prevent the paper buckling/cockling you pre-stretch it, That is you wet the paper and tape it down to a rigid board with gum strip. I generally use a wooden drawing board that I made in work shop practice 50 odd years ago. Note masking tape does not work as well as gum-strip for this as it does not adhere very well to wet paper. You paint onto the ...


11

Yes! Different papers have different "tooth" -- this is another term for the roughness of the paper. The smoother a piece of paper feels, the less tooth; the rougher, the more tooth. Most writing or copier/printer paper has very little tooth. It's not common for a tooth "value" to be shown on a package of paper, but different levels of tooth are sold for ...


11

A sewing machine without thread does a great job at making a perforation in most paper. Depending on the settings it can be rather coarse, or quite fine. Much of this will depend on what stitch types your machine is capable of. I would not use your nicest needle however, as it will most likely wear prematurely. Otherwise, there are purpose built perforators ...


10

In short Yellow carpenters/wood glue or white craft glue should both work fine for kids projects. I found yellow glue to be a little stronger. I think it is important to give the glue time to cure / dry. Following the instructions on the bottle would be important to ensure you are using the glue properly. When gluing macaroni make sure the entire surface,...


10

A 'finished' artwork is a piece that has been worked to a particular level of detail. There are various levels of 'finish' from a basic outline to a 'finished' sketch, then from a basic drawing to a highly 'finished' piece of work. To give an example, an artist might do a rough sketch of an idea and then a more detailed sketch or a colour sketch or even ...


9

When paper gets wet, it expands. Apply wet watercolour to only part of the paper, and only part of the paper will expand, causing the paper to buckle. If there are no constraints on the paper, the paper will dry buckled. (This effect will be less noticeable the thicker the paper is.) Before you paint You can purchase blocks of paper where every page is ...


9

I can think of a couple reasons why your paper curled like that: Vertically displayed paper has a tendency to curl more in my experience, especially when it has no support. The gum/glue itself may be causing or aggravating the curling. Some adhesives and coatings draw, or shrink inward, as they dry. (You see this in nail polish, too, when some thicker top ...


9

When rejecting DIY solutions, you are limiting your choice a lot. Methylcellulose (MC)-glued double and triple tissue and well as self-made tissue foil are very popular and relatively inexpensive materials for folding exactly the kind of models you describe. The situation is not hopeless, however. There are ready-made papers which may suit your needs, but ...


8

Freezer paper is a product that has a waxed coating on only one side. It's sort of like a hybrid of oven paper (also called parchment paper, baking paper, or ladokola) and wax paper. Neither wax paper nor oven paper can substitute for freezer paper in this particular application, because the wax on one side is being used as a temporary adhesive. After heat ...


8

I'm not sure what you're defining as "normal drawing paper" or "sketch paper," but you can ultimately use markers on any surface, however you will experience different results depending on the qualities of the paper. Weight Markers will generally soak into the paper and bleed to some degree (with some brands tending to bleed more than others); working with ...


7

This will probably work well for decently-small sized holes that are around 2 mm in diameter: These things can be pretty useful. You often see them in paper cutting three of them at a time, so you can put them into your binders and duo tangs. If you've got a decent quality hole punch, you should be able to make clean cut holes without any bending - and ...


7

How to cut a tiny hole using a knife: (This method requires a very steady hand and caution.) Draw the hole. You can use whatever technique you want. If you want to avoid people seeing marks, you can draw and cut the hole from the reverse side. I have also used a scoring tool instead, as this leaves no marks afterward. Use the correct blade. I use blade 11 ...


7

Place the paper in a sealed box or plastic bag together with an open jar with a bit of ammoniac in it and leave it. The fumes will age it (works well with wood too). Another way is to bake the paper at around 100 C (200 F). It will give you an even brown colour. You can put some steel wool together with vinegar in a jar and leave it for a week or 2. Then ...


7

Simply put, that is a rubber stamp. That particular one appears to be professionally machine-made given the fine detail in the rendered image e.g. lines in the skull and the typography this would be expected. That does not mean you are forced to have one made. You can get very good results making your own. Although I doubt you could make the one you ...


7

it's not a rolling tool, but a paper burnisher will do as you require. One form of the tool is a rod style handle with a rounded end similar to a ball bearing. In various sizes, they compress the paper when forced along a line, allowing the fold action. Other forms are variations of this concept with the common factor of a rounded tip to prevent cutting or ...


7

The "post-it" notes, if on standard sticky notes paper, cannot be made into a quilt directly. If you want to do this in future, you should look into coloured and starched squares of high thread-count cotton or linen to write on, use fabric markers to write the notes with, then just use them as normal quilting squares afterward. Real Quilt If you ...


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