14

The distinction between the crafts are the tools used and how many stitches are held at the same time. Crochet is done with a single hooked needle and typically only a few stitches are held at one time before being crocheted off. Knitting is done with two or more needles, and rows of stitches are held open before being knitted off. Afghan/Tunisian ...


13

For hook sizes, it's always best to refer to the size of the hook in mm, if possible. This should be standard across all countries. Metric sizes are used in many countries including Australia and New Zealand. UK sizes are generally used in the UK and Canada. US sizes are generally used only in the US. The equivalents (when applicable) are below. Note that ...


12

You might try a method called "Corner to corner" crochet (C2C). It seems to be relatively "new" and was something I was really intrigued to find out about. It's often used for making diagonal-style blankets but there are certainly examples of it being used for pixel-style art work. It has the benefit of being dual-sided and it does allow for semi-regular ...


10

Yarn Bowl This is the easiest suggestion I can think of. You just need a bowl or bowl like object with a hole or path for the yarn to come out. The hole is large enough for the yarn but small enough to stop the ball from moving around. The weight of the bowl is important as well since you will be pulling on it. Having it close to yourself would help that ...


9

What you need to do is put your yarn in a container of some sort. It should be wide enough that the yarn can roll around a bit (don't want it to rub hard against the sides) and deep enough that the yarn can't easily jump out, but other than that the sky's the limit. Containers I've used and/or heard about include: yarn bowls baskets (be careful with wicker, ...


9

It could be that you have too much tension on the corners. Make sure not to pull your stitches too tight when you are turning. It's also possible this is just the natural pull of the material, and you aren't necessarily doing anything wrong. This is fairly common in knitting, but no reason it couldn't happen with crochet stitches too. The process of ...


8

The finger positioning—actually the way the yarn loops around the fingers—controls the overall tension of the yarn. Think of it like the path the thread takes on a sewing machine—all those ups, downs and arounds between the thread spool and the needle to make a nice even stitch on the fabric. Fortunately the yarn path around the fingers is much more ...


8

First it is important to leave a long enough tails so that you have enough to weave in. I usually just use a plastic needle and work inside and out of stitches to try and wrap around yarn. In the places where I know part of the ends are to be seen you would try to force those on the bottom of the work or where people wont see (like the inside of a hat.) ...


8

So I'm a big knitter and crocheter and a musician with tendinitis for the past 20 years. Aside from the standard advice (NSAIDs, massage, etc) there are a few things that you can do to mitigate the situation. First, make sure that the amount of pressure you're using is the bare minimum amount possible. It may actually take some time to retrain your hands, ...


7

Good quality patterns, especially for clothes, have information about 'gauge'. These numbers will tell you the tightness that the creator of the pattern intended: how many stitches fit horizontally and vertically in a square of 10x10cm (4x4 inches) or 1x1 inch (2,5x2,5cm). Before you start working on the piece itself, you should crochet a sample: a small ...


7

There are about nine or ten main stitches that are the most commonly used and, of them, four or five are probably used the most. Most common US stitch abbreviations: ch - chain bpsc (or bpdc, bptc) - back post single crochet (double crochet, triple crochet) dc - double crochet dtr - double treble crochet hdc - half double crochet fpsc (or fpdc, fptc) - ...


7

Fortunately, if you are familiar with reading charted patterns, the icons are the same, so the only issue is if you don't know how to read charts or if you prefer to read written out patterns. A couple of the terms are the same - "chain stitch" and "slip stitch". Most of the rest can be somewhat easy to remember if you can remind yourself ...


7

I think you'll enjoy trying what's called the "invisible decrease". By running through two stitches but not actually making the base of both of them, it tightens up the space and only shows a single stitch. It can actually be challenging to see where the decrease is after it's completed. From the linked article (there are images included for both right and ...


7

The main issue with Tunisian crochet is that, since you don't turn your work, all your tension will be distributed on the same side of your project, with nothing to "balance" it and prevent the curl. Apart from blocking, all the methods suggested to reduce the curl are actually methods to reduce the tension. There are a lot of blog articles and videos ...


7

In addition to being extremely insulative, wool is ideal for something like a coffee cozy because it is stable in the presence of a fairly high degree of applied heat, it is un-meltable, and it has a very high combustion point. For a practical example of wool’s ability to withstand heat, when pressing wool, the recommended iron setting is 148 °C (300 °F), ...


7

Unlike natural fibers which can be blocked by simply shaping the item while wet, blocking acrylic requires heat. Many people try to wet-block acrylic the same way they would do wool, and they aren't happy with the results so they conclude (incorrectly) that there's no point in blocking acrylic. That's not true. There's simply very little point in wet ...


6

This question is difficult to answer without knowing exactly what your finished unstarched piece looks like. Even with a lot of "extra" stitches in each row you should be able to eventually create a flat piece. I haven't made snowflakes in years so I don't remember the exact process but if I were to do one today I would probably do something like this: Wet ...


6

Each type of fiber has unique characteristics that must be taken into account when considering substitution (which is pretty much a pattern-by-pattern process). Some examples: Machine Washability Silk and pure wool arn't machine washable, cotton and most synthetics are, linen is actually improved by being machine washed. Breathability All of the natural ...


6

Most amigurumi patterns are worked in the round, not flat. For flat items the difference between regular and back loop only (blo) crochet stitches is striking, it creates horizontal ridges, which are often used to imitate ribbing, like in this sock: In items worked in the round the difference is more subtle: a horizontal line appears between rows of ...


6

Human hair is primarily made of keratin and is usually somewhat oily (a result of the sebaceous glands lubrication to help the follicles grow out of their subepidermal sheathing). Although keratin also forms the basis of horn, claws and even fingernails, it is an organic protein that can serve as food for microorganisms. It has a long history in art, which ...


6

The best resource for all crochet and knitting needs by far is Ravelry. Ravelry requires you to create an account and provides an astounding library of patterns, yarns (so it's easy to find a substitute), a community platform and your own project notebook. Some paterns are paid-for, but many are available free. As of me writing this reply there are over 1600 ...


6

Evenly spaced stitches means that the number of stitches between increases is approximately the same. Since you are increase 50 sts over 94 current stitches, and 94/50=1.88 you should put (on average) 1.88 sts between increases. That means your increases will be done in some combination of (m1,k1) and (m1,k2) repeats. There are helpful calculators available ...


5

Something that can help on its own or even partner with the concept of the bowl is to work the yarn from the inside of the spool. This works better for skeins but what you do is reach inside the skein and pull out the small ball of yarn that is inside. That is the end of the whole roll. If you can get that out, the yarn will feed from the inside and it won'...


5

I want to say that I love the look of those yarn bowls and would love to have one, but my method is a little bit different from the suggestions. I wanted something that would allow my yarn to unspool as I worked, but that I could also transport easily. A friend made me a bag that had a super smooth (I would say it is satin) interior so the yarn could move ...


5

If you can't tell if you're using the correct loops then nobody else will be able to tell if you did it correctly, or not, either. For projects like this it's often completely okay to work along as you can, perhaps counting the stitches so you get the right amount per row, and not worrying about where exactly they're going.


5

An easy solution is to use stitch markers. There are several commercial options available and DIY ones are conceptually easy as well. Most that you see though won't be particularity useful for amigurumi. In that case I would suggest small safety pins, rings or feed in some floss as you move your rows. Anything you can do to mark where a particular stitch is ...


5

Here is an amazing tutorial for how to close amigurumi shapes. It's a bit of work but the results are beautiful. Essentially, this method works by creating an identical system to your opening magic loop (if you're using the magic loop start), by adding a drawstring to the last circle of stitches. This drawstring can then be pulled until the circle is ...


5

As with any repetitive strain injury (RSI), rest, moist-heat-then-ice, massage, compression, NSAIDs and, of course, physical therapy can all help. For me, I've generally found that plenty of aerobic exercise to increase circulation through tight sore muscles is what will fix/relieve RSI issues the most quickly for me. YMMV. The main problem is that this is a ...


5

Genrally in amigurumi you don't crochet in rows, but in spiral. This way there is no visible seam at all, but you usually need a stitch marker to keep track of where rows begin and end. Here is a photo of a bottom of a bunny I made, to illustrate how it's done and looks:


5

Assuming this is a commercial skein, I don't generally have issues. I am usually able to pull out the center of a skein. I would never guarantee that you can do this though. This can be manufacturer specific. There is no mandate to ensure that you can get a center pull from a skein. However, when it comes to most of the skeins of the following style: ...


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