15

The flocculent beauty of the work you show is not that the artists drew a single hair (that would never achieve the effect) the beauty came from the artists layering one drawn hair "over" another and repeating it until the desired depth was achieved. I can think of two artists on Youtube who demonstrate this layering process (with explanations for their ...


10

If the pieces are likely to be handled and/or displayed then using fixative sprays is probably the best option. There are two purposely manufactured types: Workable Final Workable Fixative As the name suggests, this allows you to add additional layers to your work after the spray has been used. Workable Fixative is a thin solution and it sets up a new ...


7

Spray fixative should make the drawing more matte as well as protecting it. You could also try a layer of acrylic matte medium, sprayed or brushed, but that would be a little more involved and riskier to the original work if it cannot handle the wet medium. Either way do some test pieces before trying on the finished work. I also would recommend ...


7

Yes, it is absolutely possible to completely fixate the pigment on its support, but there is a lot of difference in quality between brands and purposes. So, yes, you probably have a low-quality or inappropriate one - assuming your support is not wet or too smooth, which can both impede the fixation. A couple of coatings is usually the recommended application....


7

Yes, you can mix media. But you need to preserve some of the tooth of your paper's surface to successfully transition from working with graphite to charcoal. The tooth of your paper determines how well things will catch and hold to the surface of the paper. As you pass your pencil, or charcoal, across the paper's surface little bits of the drawing tool are ...


6

PROFESSIONAL VERSION Put on a pair of clean white cotton gloves. Mount the drawing on an acid-free sheet of museum board with archival mounting tape. Prepare a beveled matt with an interior size 1-2 cm smaller than your paper. Attach the matt to the museum board with one strip of archival tape along the top edge. Place a piece of 5 mm thick plexiglas on ...


6

No, you don't really need that white charcoal :) However, it can be a very useful and fun to work with. White charcoal can be used to create highlights in drawings, and is particularly effective in combination with dark charcoal. It is often used in academic drawing when drawing from a real-life references, like nudes: Pierre-Paul Prud'hon - Standing female ...


6

Paper will yellow over time because of lignin in the pulped wood. Choosing an archival, acid-free fixative means that the fixative itself should not yellow over time. Unfortunately, the primary purpose of the fixative is to prevent smudging of the media that is on your paper. While it can slow down paper yellowing over time (by reducing the surface area of ...


5

Is coconut shell good to produce charcoal for drawing? I am sure that will work just fine. It does depend on the type of shape you want, as the structure of coconut shell is not optimal: it is naturally curved, making it hard - if not impossible - to get nice straight styluses out of it, and it might splinter more easily when exposed to high temperatures, ...


5

Workable Fixative is meant to "freeze" what work has been completed already. By spraying when the charcoal layer is finished, before beginning the pencil layer, you "fix" the charcoal layer to minimize smudging of it during work on the pencil layer. There may still be some minor smudging or transfer of charcoal in heavier areas, but it will be drastically ...


5

I have used both charcoal and graphite for art projects. I have personally never combined the two in a single project. Charcoal Charcoal is generally much darker, bolder and messier. It's easy to fade charcoal or wipe it off the paper entirely if you make mistakes. Charcoal, due to its brittle nature is also easy to smudge or gently wipe to assist in your ...


5

You can use the sharp edge of your charcoal for finer line work: on a break in the piece or along the edge of the flat area created during shading, or sanded down for this purpose. Renew the edge you are using often to keep it sharp. A rectangular style charcoal may work better for this. Of course, any stylus based tool can be used to make hatch marks, so ...


5

These charcoal pencils are just a demonstration of the styles of pencil you might encounter. Wooden Coated Charcoal The first pencil, labeled "soft" is a softer charcoal pencil, coated in wood. Wooden charcoal pencils are generally cheaper and require a sharp blade (ex exacto knife) to sharpen them. They would not easily sharpen in a traditional pencil ...


5

I would lean toward using acid-free tissue paper. It comes in all sizes and you can cut out sheets large enough to separate your drawings. I think this is similar to what my sisters use. Of course one of the things that could help preserve them is spray a fixative on them, to help keep them from smudging. Last if you need a physical container, there are ...


5

Kneaded erasers are usually perfect for erasing charcoal. However, when it comes to erasing charcoal, the success of kneaded erasers depends on a few factors: The type of paper I've experienced problems erasing charcoal from papers with very low to no grain (this includes the typical A4 printer paper, on which it is hard to draw with anything to begin with)....


5

I have done a lot of charcoal drawings, and I mostly used paper by Canson (XL, Academy) and Fabriano (large sheets or rolls of the Accademia variety). They create several ranges of papers, and both include very affordable ones. I have not had problems with yellowing of paper, despite some of these works being almost twenty years old, but admittedly most are ...


5

You won't notice a lot of differences between using vine and willow charcoal. Vine (of the grape) tends to be slightly darker in tone, is physically a little harder than willow, and I believe it has a somewhat finer structure. Vine is thinner and usually a little straighter than willow. The latter can come in a larger variety of thicknesses, which can be ...


5

Charcoal is organic matter (usually wood) that has been partially burned in a low-oxygen environment. To make it, you take wood, exclude air, and apply heat. How to make charcoal with a fire and a metal container packed full of wood pieces Supply list: small pieces of wood (eg willow or charcoal) a metal container with a lid and vent hole(s) an outdoor fire ...


4

I tried my hands on making charcoal with coconut shells. I used the technique shared by most of the youtubers where they use a perforated can to cook the raw material(in this case broken pieces of coconut shell). The result was not that appealing in the sense that the charcoal I ended up with was not making dark marks as expected in the paper. Instead, there ...


4

Drawing charcoal is made in two general ways. One is to start with wood that is naturally in stick form and turn it into charcoal by burning it in a kiln without air. Grape vines and willow sticks are commonly used for that, but DIYers use almost any kind of available sticks, or even lumber cut into sticks. The drawing characteristics of the result are ...


4

You will probably need medium and soft charcoal for creating smoothly blended surfaces (like her skin), and some hard charcoals or perhaps even a carbon pencil (which contains a mixture of charcoal and graphite) for the crisp textures of her armor and the fine lines of her hair. For blending, you may want to use a tortillion or a blending stump and a kneaded ...


4

Joachim's answer provides very good info focused on the archival aspect to what makes a "good paper" in your question. But he just touches upon the two most critical aspects of what makes a good paper as far as drawing on it is concerned: the weight and the tooth of the paper. Weight being a combination of thickness and durability, tooth being the ...


3

If you use graphite, then you have the properties of graphite: it conducts electricity and it shines. To make it less shiny after using it, you most likely need to apply a layer of something which washes away (partially) the shine, but still leaves the drawing visible. You can try some of the following: special plastic sheet, used instead of glass, to ...


3

There is a type of spray that is often used by film production teams called “dulling spray”. It is a spray that kills reflections on anything, because in movies you DO NOT WANT HIGHLIGHTS. The spray is expensive and quite a challenge to come by, as the best sprays are only distributed by photography and film equipment rental shops. If you do use it, ...


3

Using a fixative, as described in previous answers here, is a standard way of protecting one's own work. On an acquired piece, you're free to do whatever you want with your own property. However, it would likely negatively affect the market value or historical value of the piece. On a valuable or historical work, fixative might be viewed similar to "...


3

Sandpaper. Really, imho the best way to sharpen charcoal pencils is by using sandpaper (100 grit). Works really, really well and the result is perfect.


2

The characteristics between soft charcoal pencil and light charcoal pencil are different. Soft charcoal pencil is darker than medium and hard charcoal pencil, it is a black color. It's easy to crush, and the first time I used it, it became very short in one day. 'Light' charcoal have two meanings: Light can mean hard, as 'light, medium, dark' corresponds ...


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