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8

What you need is exterior masonry paint. Which specific kind of exterior masonry paint may depend on what sort of stone you're using. This page from a decorating advice site tells you which kind of paint to use in which context. It's written from the point of view of painting walls of a building, but some of it may still be useful to you. In particular, ...


6

As both material are kind of mineral, I think the same glue should work on both. The surface must be clean, in other words free of grease and dust. Ethanol or isopropanol work usually well. It will glue better on rough surface, so if it fits in your work sand paper the surface before cleaning and applying glue. For the shell, depending on the type, maybe ...


5

There are lapidary materials that can be cut without using specialized saws. Small raw gemstones are not good candidates, however. Prior to modern lapidary equipment, cutting small gemstones relied on understanding, and taking advantage of, a stones natural cleavage. This method gives very little flexibility as to how and where you cut, and will result in ...


5

If the scratch is small enough but has discolored edges (like a scratched or chipped glass) then you could rub some vaseline or silicone oil over it to even out the light refraction. If the scratch is deeper, I'm afraid there's not much you can do but grind the stone down and polish it again. Filling the scratch with things like clear nail polish, spray ...


4

If it is residue white vinegar should remove it. Gentle rubbing with wet Bon Ami powder also takes off combination gunk from things like fabric softener. Laundry detergent isn't usually strongly alkaline enough to etch silicates.


4

Epoxy resin I love the stuff for the same reason John Vukelic's answer does so I would recommend it here as well. Even some of the cheap 2 parts should work perfectly fine for this. It is very good at bonding different material even when the surfaces are not perfectly mated. The two parts about Gorilla Glue that need to be cautioned here is that it has ...


4

If you use transparent gloss paint to coat the stone after painting, it will look like polished you are very flexible in your choice of colour - the only constraint you have that your colour has be reconcilable with the gloss paint.


3

Try car filler. You mix 2 components to create an epoxy. It's not expensive, easy to handle and sets quickly. I've just tried it on 2 random pebbles without preparing them and it gave a good result. However, the pink color could be a problem.


3

Depending on your intended there are a number of glue type. I used GOOP-II for bonding shells to a heavy textured paper - shell bits & shards stay in one place and seems to last forever. Nice thing is it’s clear.


2

I have tried silicon glue as well. Usually masons and plumbers use it for quick fix solutions. Preheating the stones with heat gun also enhances the capability in absorbing the glue and better bonding


2

I would strongly advise to not just cut any gemstones without expert knowledge. The issue is not just hardness but chipping. Different gemstones react very different to impact or stress and can easily break or chip. One exception is amber for example because it's very soft and can be worked on without much risk of damage. Most stones are not that easy ...


2

There are really two aspects to gluing the stones. One is the glue. The materials (canvas and stone) are different in almost every way and the canvas is not really a rigid surface, so you will get the most reliable, long-term attachment with a glue that remains flexible and adheres to both kinds of surfaces. E6000, as suggested by Lyssagal, was the first ...


1

What about Feather Rock? That is lightweight and easy to alter. Or check out some of the hidden outdoor speaker ideas and simply convert them for your project.


1

A 'grab' type adhesive intended for construction should work well for this. These are generally very viscous and packaged in caulk gun style cartridges. There are various different formulations but they have broadly similar properties. Gripfill is a common brand but there are many others. These has the advantage that they provide immediate adhesion and ...


1

I'm with BrownRedHawk in that 2 part epoxy would be good for this job in a general sense. It bonds really well to all sorts of materials however there are a number of prerequisites that would hinder good adhesion. You want maximum surface area contact. So the items will need to be cleaned of debris and loose components (like smaller rock fragments or shell ...


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