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6

Prepare a jewelry cleaning kit... moisten separate squares of paper towel in common solvents and put each in a separate plastic bag. make one each for clean water, water with dish-soap, rubbing alcohol, acetone (nail polish remover) and maybe... dilute ammonia and dilute bleach (but make sure these last two towels never touch each other or follow directly ...


6

We actually have a good idea of which scroll materials last for hundreds of years, because we have scrolls that are hundreds of years old. What are they made of? Parchment We have two thousand year old scrolls written on parchment (as required for Jewish Torah scrolls). These seem to be mainly written using ordinary carbon black ink, but many (particularly ...


6

Gold nib fountain pens - invented around 1850 - were originally the standard as early (fountain pen) inks had corrosive properties. Although corrosion of nibs is no longer a problem, gold nibs have other advantages. Pens of all kinds of metal (alloys) are often tipped with 'iridium' *, as the tip will have to endure the most. Apart from thickness and shape, ...


5

If the fountain pen has any kind of (suction) pump, then you will need to use the said pump. The capillary effects alone will not have the power to fight the weight of the ink itself. My personal hack I have a fountain pen with one-time-use cartridges. It came originally with a very long one (compared with what is usual in shops). Because I did not want ...


5

There is a previous discussion here: What exercises can I do to improve the line quality of my drawings? Holding a pencil is mostly up to the artist's preference. Discussed in the link above, if you want to have shorter strokes or finer detail, you would want to use more of the fingertips. If you want a more fluid motion in a line/drawing, you would want to ...


4

For such a thing I would use very fine 100% cotton, linen, or silk fabric (rough texture would make it more difficult to write on) and India/China ink to write with. No sealing. It is probably not the easiest way to write for some people, as the ink tends to ‘bleed’ to a certain extent (I personally like the effect). Use a fine pointed brush and little ink ...


4

There are many possible arts & crafts uses for white ink, so it's definitely possible to buy pens with white ink/paint. Look for a "gel" pen with white ink, and it should meet all the requirements that you have outlined. Asking at your local arts & crafts store is the fastest way to find a good source of such implements, but there are also plenty of ...


4

I'd try a correction pen, there are now quite a lot to choose from. This web page shows over a dozen kinds, and how opaque they are over black ink. The best white ink pens Matching the paper colour and white pen might be tricky.


4

Personally, for purposes such as you have listed, I use the uni-ball Signa white gel pen UM-153. With a gel pen you will have more control over the lines you are creating, and can layer the markings as needed. You might also enjoy using toned sketch paper in the future to play around with color values. Here is an example of a quick, light pressure pass-over ...


4

Ball tips I was familiar with the Uni-ball Signo 0.28mm tips (virtually the same as a 0.3mm tip, which is commonly available), but the 0.18 was new to me, and that's apparently been discontinued. I suspect that's pushing the physical limit of what you can do with a ball tip. A number of manufacturers have 0.25mm rollerballs. If you've found one with a ...


4

I don't have that particular pen, so I can't view the ball you're referring to. However, I suspect what it is. Fountain pens work by capillary action; a minute amount of ink is allowed to flow to the nib. If you tried to refill the pen at that rate, it would take forever (about the time it would take you to use up the ink in the pen by writing). The ...


4

There are things you can do to reduce the risks, as described in the other answers, but I would be wary of using any kind of pen containing liquid ink on a plane (although a "felt or fiber tipped" pen may be OK; never investigated that). I've had a Pilot Precise technical-style pen that uses disposable refills (the entire guts of the pen), leak ...


4

'Dry' and 'wet' refer to the flow of the ink. Regarding inks, the terms 'dry' and 'wet' give a relative idea of the viscosity of the ink: wet inks flow more freely, whereas dry inks have more friction. The difference, usually caused by the amount of lubricant (depending on the amount and quality of the dye used), can be very subtle, and hard to spot, but ...


4

It's mostly a matter of preference, but the way you hold a pen(cil) does influence the pressure, precision, range, and rotation. Everyone develops a preferred way of holding a pen (often when learning to write), and as this grip is likely used the most, it usually is the most comfortable for that person. Because of this experience (training), this grip ...


4

For an adult with fully-developed motor skills, the holding technique that's best for you for a specific application will largely come naturally. Some muscles are stronger than others, some joints are more flexible than others, and some positions trade off fine control vs. strength and stamina. For extremely fine detail, you can manipulate the point of the ...


4

Can a fountain pen suck up the ink into its reservoir if I simply dip its nib into the ink? It depends on the type of fountain pen you're using. Simply putting the pen nib into ink will not fill a pen unless it's a rare capillary filler, like the Waterman X-Pen or Parker 61. Most fountain pens require some mechanical means of sucking up the ink; typically a ...


4

I can definitely recommend a fine asian gel pen (kind of rollerball). It is precise and very easy to use, unlike many other tools I've tried so far. It's a perfect affordable tool for detailed drawings, like miniatures, doodling, pattern fillings, i.e. things that require precise, fine strokes and points. Of course one can draw anything, but bigger areas ...


3

Fountain pens won't automatically suck up ink when you dip the nib. You'll need a converter (cartridge) for your fountain pen. Once you have the converter, it depends on what kind of converter you get: some have pressing pumps to suck up the ink, while some are twisting converters. By dipping the fountain pen nib into the ink bottle, you'll be able to suck ...


3

Fountain pens and metal-tipped technical pens rely on capillary action and flow limiters to deliver a controlled amount of ink. They're manufactured to precise tolerances, and there isn't really any form of adjustment. If the pen is clean and the ink is fresh, and the ink is in the general range of viscosity the pen is designed to handle, it should work. ...


3

It isn't clear what your objective is, whether you're trying to achieve a different writing result, or it's just that you've only found the complete pens for sale and want a way to reuse the body. Forget trying to refill rollerball cartridges. They are a complicated system designed to work together. The ink needs to be just the right viscosity and other ...


3

As I often write white text on top of black, I've been looking for a good white pen myself. A correction pen doesn't do it for me, as the correction liquid doesn't stick very well. The above-mentioned list of the best white ink pens seems like a good one. However, the pen I ended up using is not on that list. I've found that the "Edding 780 paint marker" ...


3

White pens and colors are often used to lighten up the shade in art and crafts. Apart from that they have limited uses. As per your requirements, I would suggest you to either go for either a white gel pen or a marker. Unfortunately, ball point pens that have white ink are not easily available and they will not provide the results you are looking for. My ...


3

Finding the right way to hold your pen might simply not work since your preferred way of holding a pen is incompatible with said pen. I hold pens using the (dynamic) quadropod grip, and, although I think it's relatively easy to switch these grips, I doubt that changing grips will prevent your fingers from getting irritated. I think the problem might simply ...


3

Fountain pen ink is more watery than the ink used in many other types of pens, and fountain pens put a lot of it on the paper. The combination creates a challenge for the paper that makes it difficult to have the "perfect" paper in every respect. You typically need to choose what you want to optimize, and use a paper that optimizes that. The ...


3

You should develop your own style of writing. The most important aspect, is that the hold must be comfortable, especially if you use the pen for long periods of time. Other aspects to consider, less important: esthetics, quality of the result (i.e. the writing), the coolness factor, the formal-vs-informal setup when you will use it etc. I used fountain pens ...


3

Holding a pen is to a large degree a matter of preference. However, the customary position would be neither of the two pictured and both can be tiring. The first is very close to the nib and will easily get you smudged fingers if you aren’t careful and slip even a bit. A tight grip like that (notice the strongly curved fingers) usually means that the writer’...


2

My daughter has Cerebral Palsy and writes quite well thanks to a few tricks she learned from an Occupational Therapist. Get a fat pencil or you can get a plastic sleeve that goes over a pencil. Use a soft pencil lead available in many stores, especially art stores. I recommend HB, or 2B. It is easier to control a soft pencil. Rest your forearm on a table ...


2

I'm thinking of buying antique fountain pen, but the barrel is stuck to the nib and section because ink has dried it closed. No. Dried ink is probably not why it's stuck together. With vintage fountain pens, the most typical reason why the section is stuck to the barrel is that it's been glued to the barrel with resin. The best technique is to use a heat ...


2

There are flexible ink receptacles for fountain pens known as ink sacs or bladders, like these: source However, they apparently don't give any advantage over rigid cartridges when it comes to air travel (here: "sacked pens also have trouble with rapid pressure changes", which is understandable as the material is quite rigid). What you can do, is ...


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