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8

Dipping your brush into water isn't going to do anything other than get your brush wet. To actually clean a brush, you need physical agitation, and I don't mean "swish it around in the water jar a few times" agitation, but "mash it back and forth against your other hand while holding it under running water" agitation. Use some paint brush soap (or plain old ...


7

Natural vs synthetic I did a bit of research into this and found that there are two main kinds of paintbrush bristles: natural (usually made from animal hair) and synthetic (usually made from some combination of nylon and polyester). Each of these has its own advantages and disadvantages according to what kind of paint you're using. The TL;DR is that ...


7

Clean them fast. Acryclic paint dries quickly, so it's important to clean your paintbrushes as soon as possible after you've finished using them, so that the paint doesn't get the chance to start drying and hardening on the brush. Massage the bristles thoroughly. Don't just dip the paintbrush into water and wiggle it around, and don't leave it standing in a ...


5

I think it goes without saying that softer paints need softer bristles. In my personal experience, the best brush for water colors looks a lot like a calligraphy brush (just a bit smaller). You should look for thick brush heads, long bristles and a pointy tip. Thick brush heads means that there are a lot of bristles in it. More bristles means more tiny ...


5

USE Hog hair or hog bristle brushes are stiff, strong, and durable. Having frayed ends, the bristles are usually not appropriate for watercolouring, as they aren't able to soak up a lot of water, but they are sometimes used for adding texture or scrubbing away faulty layers of watercolour. Exactly because they don't absorb a lot of fluid, they can be used ...


5

It depends on the synthetic brush that is available. Generally speaking, pony hair brushes are often used in schools since they are inexpensive, yet strong and soft. However, they do not retain the shape of the brush well when wet. Synthetic brushes on the other hand can be both well suited and terrible for painting with watercolors depending on the quality (...


5

When I'm done painting, this is how I clean up. I've kept some brushes for years like this: Soak the brush in white spirit for a minute or so Gently massage the bristles to loosen the paint and make sure as much as possible is dissolved in the spirits Put a good dollop of liquid soap onto the bristles, and gently scrub into a lather with a bit of warm water ...


5

It depend on your brushes and if : they contain glue or not to hold the hair the hair are in synthetic material (should not be your case since you have kolinsky sable brushes) In both case I would not use turpentine or other solvent on the brush since it will damage the glue and hair will go out and if the hairs are synthetic it will damage them. The ...


4

For 10 years I worked with alcohol based paints in my temporary tattoo biz. Besides using an airbrush I often used paint brushes of different quality. I would not use the turpentine to clean your brushes. Use instead isopropyl alcohol. I used it on sable brushes with no ill effect.


4

Soaking them in warm/hot water is the common procedure for removing Elmer's glue. Elmer's glue is specifically water-soluble — so if it isn't coming out then maybe it is not Elmer's. Make sure the water is warm/hot throughout the soaking. You may need to peel-off the outer layers of glue, first, and then re-soak to loosen the next layer.


4

The most important thing is to keep your brushes clean and dry between uses. Use a mild soap and lukewarm water (marseille soap is my favorite) to clean your brushes after you have used them, whether acrylic or oil. Rinse them in warm water, flick the water out and then dip them in acetone. The acetone will dry out the oils, turps and waters, leaving your ...


4

While the ink may not dissolve completely, it might still loosen up to a certain extent using hot water. It only needs to be able to become flexible again, after all. First of all, I'd try to hold it under hot water from the tap, or leave it for a while in a cup of hot water. You can try something like Rotring Pen Cleaning Solution/Fluid. I saw it suggested ...


4

"Miniature" is a reference to the length of the tuft of bristles from end of the ferrule to the tip of the brush. There is no standard to how measurements for artist's brushes are shown. The measurement is usually a number stamped on the side of the brush handle. A company standardize their own number system but that doesn't necessarily mean it's the same ...


4

How can I keep my paint brushes long lasting? Awaiting more specific information, I can already tell it's best to rinse your brushes directly after every use. Whether it's oil or acrylic you're working with, the brushes can easily be cleaned with a little soap and water. I use general hand soap bars for this - nothing fancy: don't be persuaded by the ...


3

THE BRUSHES Animal hair While it will be hard (or unethical) to come by kolinsky, wolf, red sable, or even badger or squirrel hair, some types of hair that are appropriate for watercolouring can be acquired more easily: Boar bristles (taken from the ears of hogs) are commonly associated with acrylic and oil paint use, as they are very coarse and not ...


3

You need a Brush Cleaner and Restorer formulated for this task. There are a few of these available, only in art supply stores; you'll want to check with the ones around you to see what you can purchase. If you are in the United States, Winsor & Newton makes a widely available product I have used with great results; it's formulated for dried acrylic and ...


3

Well, this topic takes up six pages in Ralph Mayer's "The Artist's Handbook" (5th edition) but I'll take a stab at it: Sables and their imitations, soft fine bristles, are for delicate work where you want to minimize the brush marks. They are very good for glazing techniques. Bristle brushes or hogs hair brushes have stiffer thicker bristles and leave more ...


3

Traditionally soft brushes have been quirrel (targeted at children/schools) and sable. For watercolor-like techniques squirrel is terrible as it does not retain its form when wet, unlike sable, which forms a nice point and remains more or less straight. The main disadvantage of sable is its price. Even cheap modern synthetic soft brushes are much better than ...


2

Although this link is for the removal of Elmer's Glue from clothing and fabrics, the basic principles can be applied to paint brushes too. How to remove glue from clothing and fabric: When dry, do not use hot water, dry cleaning solvents, a hot drum dryer or iron before the removal of the adhesive is complete, as they can fuse the adhesive film irreversibly,...


2

Yes, you can use salt water with water colours. But remember, table salt (or salt water) is highly hydrophilic. Salt attracts water. Anywhere salt is present on your paper it will attract water from the area. The water colour pigments floating in your solution will concentrate around the salt particles. As the water is drawn closer by the salt you will get ...


2

To quickly clean between color changes, I put a kitchen sponge in an old mushroom container, fill it with hot water and use it to wash the brush by dragging it back and forth over the hot, damp sponge. I then swish and rinse the brush in a large jar of cold water. This is usually enough for a clean color change using one brush. Of course, you do need to keep ...


2

If you clean them before the paint or substance (varnish, oil paint, etc.) dries on the bristles, they will last a really long time. I've kept both cheap and expensive brushes for over 30 years or more. I use this kind of brush soap. If I've used an oil-based substance, I'll clean it first with mineral spirits, then use the soap. The soap will condition ...


2

I used paint thinner to wash and clean the brush first. And after a while, rinsed with kerosene. That worked and saved my brushes.


2

A few options: Watering down the paint (as mentioned in the comments) Acrylic paint can be thinned by adding water until brush strokes self-level. If you want to be uptight, use distilled water. Chlorine and minerals in tap water may have some effect on the paint, but it's doubtful that it'd be significant. Foam brush Foam brushes are often used to avoid ...


1

As an alternative, I have used a low-fume paint stripper to smother the brushes in, and then wrap in clingwrap, and let soak for several hours. (I have not tried paint thinnners: this probably works better with oil paint than others. Correct me if I am wrong.) These may be off topic? Happy to delete. Restoring big brushes For the really stubborn bits, I've ...


1

Keep them moist, clean them. If wooden be careful of leaving submerged as the coating will peel or warp them. Personally I keep hold of my dilapidated brushes too as a distressed brush can give some interesting effects when combined with different media....


1

If the hairs go out of the ferrule One idea which I plan to test (without destroying a good brush just for testing purposes) is to inject some kind of glue at the base of the bristles / hairs. My plan is to use a medical syringe, fill it with some glue (even oil paint should do, I suppose), and fill the base of the hairs (inside the metal "clamp") with ...


1

My guess is that it's badger hair - the grey-white gradations are typical for these kinds of brushes: They are quite common, and many manufacturers produce them, including Da Vinci, Isabey, Royal & Langnickel, and Raphael. Unlike other hair, pure badger hair is thickest at the tips, giving these brushes a bushy appearance. They're excellent for ...


1

I am also a novice with watercolor. The brush pens are pleasant to work with, especially if you have more control over your application with pens over traditional watercolor brushes. You can determine how much water should be used with pressure, and also use pressure to quickly clean pigment off the brush tip. I personally use the Ohuhu water brush pens, ...


1

If the brushes where used with acrylics then a soak in methylated spirits could help.


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