12

If the knife is really that blunt, I recommend taking it to be professionally sharpened. Many craft stores offer this service either as part of their regular services or on a part-time basis (once or twice a month). Otherwise, you may have a knife sharpener in your city who would be able to do it. The cost is generally based on the length of the blade, so ...


11

It never hurts to take a machine that is new to you in for a servicing, because you don't really know how it's been treated, and what it may need. At that time, it's not a bad idea to talk to the person servicing the machine. Different models and brands of machines may need different work, and different usage levels and types of projects may require more ...


8

Your slippers are as sturdy in water as out. The are good peasant slippers, worn outside in all weathers. The leather can be saturated and then dried in a warm place as long as you don't break or overfold it. Felt is spectacularly tough. The wool embroidery just needs to avoid rubbing. You could pop them in a pillowcase soles together, tie into a neat ...


7

Since a kneaded eraser works by absorbing the pigment you are erasing along with a little friction to lift the stuff, to keep it healthy keep it away from things it can absorb. Like sand or dust. You also want to keep it dry. Keeping it off the carpet may not be not so much about keeping it healthy as keeping it from getting stuck in the fibers. Temperature ...


7

Prepare a jewelry cleaning kit... moisten separate squares of paper towel in common solvents and put each in a separate plastic bag. make one each for clean water, water with dish-soap, rubbing alcohol, acetone (nail polish remover) and maybe... dilute ammonia and dilute bleach (but make sure these last two towels never touch each other or follow directly ...


7

The grit in your plaster pits the surface of your tools, especially if the plaster still contains moisture while you're carving it. And then when you clean your tools with water the water gets into the pits and if left to sit there it will eat way at the metal. Try to get the water off your tools as fast as possible. After cleaning your tools with water, ...


7

Using sandpaper and then tidying up with craft knife is the generally accepted way of cleaning tortillon. However, it's possible that you might be using sandpaper with a low grit level (under 120) for too long. This would be almost ripping the material. I start with a 100 grit sandpaper to get rid of the graphite\charcoal staining, then use a craft knife to ...


7

This is akin to the advice, "Don't run with scissors". As rebusB points out, it isn't a necessity for the machine to work. It's because undesirable things could potentially happen, which can be easily avoided. The undesirable things aren't limited to accidental damage when moving the machine. The machine could be bumped or experience mechanical ...


5

I'm thinking of buying antique fountain pen, but the barrel is stuck to the nib and section because ink has dried it closed. No. Dried ink is not why it's stuck together. With vintage fountain pens, the section has been glued to the barrel with resin. The best technique is to use a heat gun (or hair dryer) to gently heat the barrel/section overlap area ...


5

I've heard similar things about bicycle derailleurs, and hand-tools like secateurs (pruning shears), both of which have springs inside them. There's an "old wives tale" that the spring will loose its springiness if stored under tension for a long time, so a spring should be stored in a "relaxed" or untensioned state. That means letting ...


4

While the ink may not dissolve completely, it might still loosen up to a certain extent using hot water. It only needs to be able to become flexible again, after all. First of all, I'd try to hold it under hot water from the tap, or leave it for a while in a cup of hot water. You can try something like Rotring Pen Cleaning Solution/Fluid. I saw it suggested ...


4

If these slippers are made in a traditional way, it might be relatively easy to remove the leather soles. In ye olde times many items were designed and made in a way that they could be repaired, especially the parts subjected to the most wear and tear like the soles. "Relatively easy" means that you still need the right tools, like a sturdy thick ...


4

The Taiwanese factory sent me an email to help me fix an airbrush having the nozzle stuck in the head cap 15 years ago. The solution is to use a needle-nosed plier: Place the needle-nosed plier's left tip on the left edge, and the right tip of the needle-nosed plier into the nozzle's hole. Grip using little force. Place the needle-nosed plier's right tip ...


4

Worked in a sail loft for a Summer. Never heard anything about the machines "needing" to be left that way, as in "it will not work when coming back to it". It is just a natural and easy thing to do to protect the needle and machine. Not sure if it is a tradition, other than being something you pick up when first learning to use the ...


3

Fountain pens and metal-tipped technical pens rely on capillary action and flow limiters to deliver a controlled amount of ink. They're manufactured to precise tolerances, and there isn't really any form of adjustment. If the pen is clean and the ink is fresh, and the ink is in the general range of viscosity the pen is designed to handle, it should work. ...


3

The clip can be removed by gently spinning it to loosen it a bit, then pushing it over the top of the pen. This removes it without damaging it, and it can be re-added by just pushing it back over the top.


3

With a so small blade the best is to use a grinding stone. If it is very blunt you will have to start with a coarse grain and finish with a fine one. It will take a long time... Blades generally have a 15° angle on each side. V shapeners are quicker but use it with care. Some cuts a lot of steel at once if you push too much. Also it maybe not the easiest ...


3

I'm making an assumption this is a treadle, but correct me. I will try to make my answer "power neutral". Any of the following would prompt me to service the unit: If the belt slips, or is very much cracked. If the bobbin winding wheel (usually a rubber ring) is very cracked. If it has been sitting unused for more than 10 years. If something ...


2

The rule of thumb when repairing any kind of projection system, is that it is imperative that the lens is EXACTLY parallel and centered along the light’s primary path. If you mess it up, you fail and the projection will be fuzzy and/or distorted. I recommend the following two step approach. Get some plasteline (non-drying modelling clay). Put the lens in ...


2

The most realistic fix is to buy a new pair of shoes... If you must fix this somehow, be aware from the very first second that it will never look new or professional again and will probably break again very quickly. First you need to cut away all the losee strands and pieces. The heel could probably be repaired with construction silicone (preferably white). ...


2

In my experience, blending stumps can be cleaned fairly well by molding a kneadable eraser around the tip and twisting them inside the eraser several times. If it doesn't get most of the graphite, etc. off the first time, knead in the graphite and repeat as necessary. I've tried sanding and carving them, but I've never been satisfied with the results. The ...


1

If the hairs go out of the ferrule One idea which I plan to test (without destroying a good brush just for testing purposes) is to inject some kind of glue at the base of the bristles / hairs. My plan is to use a medical syringe, fill it with some glue (even oil paint should do, I suppose), and fill the base of the hairs (inside the metal "clamp") with ...


1

According to sewingpartsonline.com (not an endorsement) the Husqvarna Viking cog belt (short 9 1/2") part number is 4111940-01: Guaranteed to fit Husqvarna Viking Sewing Machine Models: #1+, 100, 1020, 1030, 1040, 105, 1060, 120, 1200, 1250, 150, 180, 185, 190, 2000, 2020, 3230, 3240, 4020, 4030, 5220, 5230, 5430, 6010, 6030, 610, 6170, 620, 6230, 6240,...


1

I bought a piece of 1/16" rubber sheet. Glued it to bottom of old pad on sander. https://www.dropbox.com/s/1ggm4j56fym0mdl/20180827_122005.jpg?dl=0 Because of the extra thickness, the sand paper is a little harder to fit between clamps.


1

Plaster is indeed particularly bad for rusting steel. It helps a lot if you give your tools a light coating of a hard paste wax (eg car polish) before use. This creates a water repelling surface layer which protects them in the short terms and also helps prevent wax from sticking. It is also good to keep a bucket of water hand to rinse the plaster off them ...


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