23

Watercolor paper is, normally, quite a bit heavier and made from cotton. Basic watercolor paper, 140lb, is okay for practice and will tend to buckle unless stretched. The expensive 300lb paper is where professionals tend to land. In any case, the paint pools and absorbs differently than normal paper, and gives you options around blending, washes, etc. that ...


8

Definition of drawing Drawing is the technique of putting marks on a surface to create an illusion of the thing or things to be represented. Drawing can be done with pencil and paper, digital drawing tablet or even a piece of silver wire on gessoed panel. It sounds pedantic, but one of the fundamentals of drawing is remembering that a drawing is a ...


8

The starting point is important, but there isn't a single right answer. What will work best for a given person depends on how they visualize things, and the skills they have developed. Your result turning out "not that good" is likely due mostly to not yet having developed sketching skills comparable to the artists in the videos. It takes a lot ...


8

In my drawings, the starting point is determined by the largest area(s) that roughly capture(s) the basic shape and orientation of the subject. I often represent this largest area using basic flat geometrical shapes (circle, triangle, square, rectangle, &c.) that I refine more and more - initially using straight lines - into the silhouette of the subject....


8

There are some fundamentals that everyone who wants to draw needs to learn. (Not in order of importance). #1 Control exercises Make yourself comfortable with a pencil and paper, draw straight lines - 1/4, 1/2 and full width of a paper - draw 5 times over each line and try to hit the line as precicely as you can. Same thing for circles or ovals. Draw 2 Lines ...


6

Best way I know is just making a cross on both the original and lightly on the paper you will be drawing onto. That stops you getting too technical, and forces you to look at spaces and shapes, which is what drawing is really about. If you start in the middle (for example) and work outwards, copying SHAPES, without trying to identify them as e.g. "nose", "...


6

A historical reason for having writing desks at an incline was that quill pens work better that way. If you ever tried writing with a quill and ended up with a blotchy mess instead of some nice calligraphy, part of the reason was probably that you were writing on a horizontal surface, and thus were holding the pen pretty close to vertical. The closer to ...


6

For sketching newsprint is the art school standard because it's cheap and it has a bit of tooth. Printer paper is very smooth, which makes it less suitable for drawing with graphite or charcoal. The tooth is what holds the graphite and charcoal in place. A number 2 pencil is very hard, so you have to press firmly to make a darker mark. You should treat ...


6

There usually isn't a right, or wrong way of drawing per say, but getting a rough idea of where you want to put it on a piece of paper(For instance if you want to draw a full human body, or a bike) Getting a rough sketch or idea of where everything goes, makes it less of a slip up for accidentally cutting off the head and legs, because there wasn't enough ...


5

The fundamentals of drawing begin with being able to draw a few basic shapes - sphere, cube or box, pyramid, cylinder. Once you master these - which is often done by composing still life exercises that include objects with these shapes - then you can draw almost anything! Learning to draw those shapes in space, from varying viewpoints and with varying light ...


5

The big difference is that when you draw from a photo the image is already flattened onto a 2 dimensional plane, however when drawing from life you have to deal with translating 3D to 2D yourself. The way we see in 3 dimensions is rather more complex than you might imagine and the way we understand and visualise an object is very different from a ...


4

That really depends on the paper itself. Usually, sketch paper will be too thin for watercolors to come out in a satisfactory manner. That being said, it all depends on what your final outcome is. Where the piece will be displayed, and what effects you are trying to get.


4

Remember that white only looks white when there is 'white' light (light containing a wide range of wavelengths, I won't go into details here) that it can reflect. Even snow can look dark. For realistic shading, you have to know what the subject you are drawing, looks like. So, find examples. Look at yourself in a mirror when it's dark outside, use a lamp to ...


4

You are on the right path. You just need to take the next step and draw with a larger grid. When people first start to draw the grid method helps the artist develop their ability to see what is in front of them. The mind has a habit of playing tricks on how we perceive an image, the brain places greater emphasis on what it "thinks" is important and less ...


4

I'd try a correction pen, there are now quite a lot to choose from. This web page shows over a dozen kinds, and how opaque they are over black ink. The best white ink pens Matching the paper colour and white pen might be tricky.


4

Understand your subject: Depending on your subject and interests this may include: perspective; colour theory; composition; human and animal anatomy, etc. Know your materials: Get familiar with the essence of your materials (pencil, paint, paper, coffee, tablet, pixels, vectors, etc.), in order to make the most of what they can offer. It may be that your ...


4

Personally, for purposes such as you have listed, I use the uni-ball Signa white gel pen UM-153. With a gel pen you will have more control over the lines you are creating, and can layer the markings as needed. You might also enjoy using toned sketch paper in the future to play around with color values. Here is an example of a quick, light pressure pass-over ...


4

It’s a ‘Brown + Sharpe toolmakers knife-edge #530’ In the video he was probably just referring to the second ruler he showed with the bevelled edge.


4

One way I think is common among comic artists is through instancing*: after having drawn a few of the figures in different positions, you can copy instances of these individual figures unto the panel using either a lightbox or light table, when working with traditional tools, or image editing software (e.g. Photoshop or Clip Studio Paint), when taking a ...


3

how will I know when I have found a good ribbing to be both elastic enough to stretch when I change position The waistband ribbing and the elastic both have to stretch enough to go over your hips. and sturdy enough to hold the whole skirt up when I don't know yet how much the rest of the skirt will weigh compared to the ribbing The waistband ...


3

As I often write white text on top of black, I've been looking for a good white pen myself. A correction pen doesn't do it for me, as the correction liquid doesn't stick very well. The above-mentioned list of the best white ink pens seems like a good one. However, the pen I ended up using is not on that list. I've found that the "Edding 780 paint marker" ...


2

For me having the angle helps with fatigue and body aches after I’m finished working on a piece. I often get zoned in and lose time when I’m drawing, sometimes I sit at my desk and put on music and the first time I look at the clock it might be 12-13 hours I’ve been fixated on an idea, or 12 hours simply trying to make a hand look realistic haha. My ...


2

Working from a photo is easy. Working from real life is testing how well you can see. It is not easy to get past what you think something should look like and what it actually looks like. As someone said above, you are working from 3D to 2D to get the illusion of 3D. Your tonal values will make or break you, because they are trick the eye into seeing 3D. I ...


2

There are so many ways to go about getting an image on a page and you've gotten a LOT of good ideas here. I really recommend searching for drawing instruction on-line, such as on Youtube. This isn't the sort of forum where you'll get adequate drawing and sketching instruction. That said: Observation. Strive to see what is THERE, not what you "know" to be ...


2

At university my drawing tutor used to encourage us to use the cheapest sketching materials we could find as he said it would encourage us to be more bold and less 'precious' with our work; the idea is that there should be less anxiety over mistakes because you haven't 'ruined' an expensive canvas. Newsprint was great for me, mainly using charcoal (either ...


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