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14

It is called an Oblique Calligraphy Pen. It is used because it makes it much easier to hold the nib pointing in angles that are otherwise very hard to achieve if you're right handed (oblique angles):


11

Have you removed the protective (oil) coating of your nibs? Some people burn their nibs (over a candle, for example), but doing this they also re-temper the metal of the nib. (Don't do this if your nib is attached to plastic, of course.) I'd recommend to remove the coating with a Q-tip soaked in nail polish remover (acetone) (you can even try lemon/lime ...


9

All the liquid calligraphy inks I know of are ready to use, no dilution required. Pigmented ink must be well mixed before use for the pigment to be uniformly dispersed. I find acrylic ink sometimes hard to remove from the nibs if not immediately cleaned Iron Gall ink flows well and is a pleasure to use but requires an acid free paper. The ink will look very ...


6

Note: This is a more expensive, albeit an efficient method. Requirements: A bright lightbox, or lightpad A grid printout An alternative would be to get a lightbox/lightpad, and place gridded paper beneath the sheet you are drawing to. When illuminated, the grid should be visible through your worksheet (this depends on the brightness of your lightpad, and ...


5

No. As there is no place for the fountain pen tip to hold a reservoir of ink through dipping. A dip pen has a slight concave curvature. This curvature helps to hold, with the help of the surface tension of the ink, a small supply of ink on the backside of the nib. As you draw the dip pen across the surface of the paper the tip of the pen deposits a small ...


5

The kind of embossing powder that I'm familiar with, is melted with a heat gun. After being melted, it gets smooth and creates an embossed layer above the paper. I think any kind of strong durable paper that can tolerate heat as well as a little weight, e.g. card stock, could work well.


5

Yes, inkjet ink works with brushes. It's thinner than the usual ink for dip pens, but give it a try. I haven't broken open cartridges to get it, but used the ink from a refill kit. Because they're pure, primary colours, you can theoretically mix any other colour from them, just as the printer does. You can certainly get strong, saturated shades.


4

Ball tips I was familiar with the Uni-ball Signo 0.28mm tips (virtually the same as a 0.3mm tip, which is commonly available), but the 0.18 was new to me, and that's apparently been discontinued. I suspect that's pushing the physical limit of what you can do with a ball tip. A number of manufacturers have 0.25mm rollerballs. If you've found one with a ...


4

Year-old question, but timeless subject matter. You asked about the procedure. For completeness, I'll add a little detail about that, and some thoughts on the paper. The embossing powder is finely ground plastic that melts at a relatively low temperature. You need to apply the powder to the paper only where you want it. That's done by writing or ...


4

Due to the many different kind of quill pens nib designs, I don't think any definitive yes-no answer is possible here. Generally, yes, ink will flow. What kind of writing you want to do will have much influence on the decision about whether you use it. Probably the best choice is to experiment by having a few controlled dips, and creating a few controlled ...


4

There are a couple of things you need to consider before we look at storage options. Ensure your nibs are clean When you are done using your nibs you should ensure that you medium is removed and clean before you store it. Most people suggest just using room temperature water or more specifically distilled water (that would have less mineral build up that ...


4

Inkflow with any liquid-ink pen has to do with capillary action and liquid/air exchange. If a pen is skipping, the flow is being interrupted. Check that there are no obstructions along the nib or nib slit(s), and then check the feed (the plastic bit against the nib) of the pen. It could simply be an air gap that's fixed by flushing, or the feed may be too ...


3

In my experience, the best advice for newbies is that which educates them toward nolonger being newbies. The qualities of an ink are based on its composition An ink is composed of 3 parts which, together, define how it will behave. The general ingredient types are pigments, binders, and the medium. The color is usually a pigment or dye. I usually refer to ...


3

It depends on the type of fountain pen nib, but yes, you can. Obviously, you want the right tools, know-how, experience, and touch if you plan to dismantle a pen, and it's all at your own risk. Marshall & Oldfield's Pen Repair is a good guide on how fountain pens go together and come apart if you're completely new to this. With some pens, you can just ...


3

Make sure you're using a straight-edge table, and get yourself a T-Square, and an Ames lettering guide. The wheel on the Ames lettering guide rotates, so you can adjust the size between the lines, and the different hole sets account for different ascender/descender/height spacings for different styles of lettering. Make sure your paper is taped down, and ...


2

The smaller the tip, the faster it's going to wear out; 0.1 and 0.05 especially tend to wear out and break noticeably faster than wider tips, even with a light touch. There are only two solutions I personally have found for this issue: 1. Buy a cheaper pen and replace it when the tip breaks. There's some affordable brands of fineliners that do come in 0.1 (...


2

The two images in the original question are both images of pointed pen nibs. Within "pointed pens" there are variations - the top image is an oblique nib while the bottom image is an oblique pen - both are great for right handed calligraphers (and personally, my favorite type of pen for calligraphy!) - they are more comfortable to grip when doing ...


2

By cartridge I presume you mean cartridge calligraphy pens and/or their nibs. The main difference when it comes to storage of nibs is that usually cartridge (fountain) calligraphy pen nibs are stainless steel and dip pen nibs are not. So the main concern will be with moisture/damp as the dip pen nibs will try to corrode, but I would store both in a dry place ...


1

I understand that ink in fountain pen cartridges is a bit thinner. Can I still use it for dip pens if I squeeze it out of the cartridges? ... First off, a syringe typically works best for extracting or injecting inks into cartridges than squeezing. It's extraordinarily easy to buy blunt-needled syringes these days (walmart.com lists a set of four for <$3)...


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