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8

I'm not sure what you're defining as "normal drawing paper" or "sketch paper," but you can ultimately use markers on any surface, however you will experience different results depending on the qualities of the paper. Weight Markers will generally soak into the paper and bleed to some degree (with some brands tending to bleed more than others); working with ...


8

I have seen children grasp markers in a clenched fist and vigorously fill in large swaths of the drawing area with colour. It's the vigour with which the children fill the area that destroys the marker's tip. If this is what you are seeing then there are a couple of things you can try to help the children learn focus and finesse when making art ... and ...


7

The thinness you are seeing is that your pen is dispensing more of the inks suspension medium than its pigment particles. The "ink" in metallic Sharpies is made up of particles suspended in a medium. It's the separation of particles from medium that is causing the "transparency" of your inked line. Over time, as the "ink" sits stationary, the heavier ...


6

When you say "is it okay", that implies that there's a rule about what you can use with what, or that everybody who uses markers, uses a particular kind of paper for a reason. Any medium will have different characteristics on different kinds of paper. You probably want to avoid something that's incompatible. For example: a medium that's thick and brittle ...


6

About damaging the Markers. I don’t see how you could, at most, just clean the tip afterwards if you use both types toghether. Just keep in mind, according to Amazon a smooth surface is important so as to no damage the nibs. About using both types together. The Winsor & Newton Pigment Marker page only states Can I use Pigment Marker with other ...


5

I know this isn't the official answer, but I wanted to give an easy one for people as I've been drawing with markers for years now. Marker paper. Yes it's that simple. It's pure white, and doesn't bleed or spread when you apply the tip. It also instantly absorbs the marker only where you apply the tip. Comic book art, illustrations, graphic drawing, ...


5

There are a lot of artists online who use Copic markers or a mix of Copic, other brands and even other media like pencils to create texture or white ink for highlights. Often a lot of cool images you see online are actually a mix media of markers and other materials. Lets start at the beginning though... You mentioned markers you used to use had uneven ...


4

It is possible to blend using markers, though like any new medium it can take some practice as well as depend on the type of marker you're using. Water-based markers Blending water-based markers requires little to no additional special equipment, just some water and a way to apply it. As you mention experience with watercolors, this may feel fairly ...


4

I'd try a correction pen, there are now quite a lot to choose from. This web page shows over a dozen kinds, and how opaque they are over black ink. The best white ink pens Matching the paper colour and white pen might be tricky.


4

Personally, for purposes such as you have listed, I use the uni-ball Signa white gel pen UM-153. With a gel pen you will have more control over the lines you are creating, and can layer the markings as needed. You might also enjoy using toned sketch paper in the future to play around with color values. Here is an example of a quick, light pressure pass-over ...


4

Marketing copy on the Staples website listing for the silver metallic Sharpies reads (bold mine for emphasis): Achieve beautiful writing with a metallic sheen when you use Sharpie® Metallic Permanent Markers in silver. The mess-free metallic markers don't require shaking or pumping, since the free-flowing, permanent ink already resides in the fine-...


3

"Bond" paper is usually best for markers, it has a smooth flat surface and is usually thick enough to prevent too much bleed through. If fact there are specifically made papers for magic markers called "Marker Bond", "Marker Layout" or just "Marker Paper". With markers the main issue you will face is bleed, where the ink soaks in and expands in the paper. ...


3

If I was looking for such markers in my area I would go to the shops where they sell toys and craft items for kids, specially the kind of shop where they sell the cheaper items. They are not always available but often one or the other shop has markers with wider barrels and chunky tips. Look in the toy section rather than in the 'grown up's' art section. I ...


3

My silver sharper marker undergoes the opposite problem. I would store it tip down and shake it well before you use it. Even though it says you don’t need to, I find it works a little bit better if you do. I also let my sharpie run on the paper for a little bit by lightly pressing the tip on paper. This helped it release a little more of a runny ink. I’m not ...


3

I wanted to start using markers again and confronted the same issue. My solution was to try stippling and cross-hatching. My markers are super cheap but I'm thrilled with the effects of stippling. It's not for the faint of heart. You can check out some the details on my instagram. Notice in the "Treasure" dragon to the extreme left I used hatching for a ...


3

I tried an experiment on a square of random tan felt I had sitting around. I chose the letter B because it has a good mix of straight and curved lines, so I could also get an idea of how easy a particular marker was to use. Clockwise, from top left: Permament Marker (Sharpie) Washable Marker (Faber Castell) Fabric Marker (Marvy) Fabric Paint (Tulip) ...


3

As I often write white text on top of black, I've been looking for a good white pen myself. A correction pen doesn't do it for me, as the correction liquid doesn't stick very well. The above-mentioned list of the best white ink pens seems like a good one. However, the pen I ended up using is not on that list. I've found that the "Edding 780 paint marker" ...


2

You can get acrylic based markers of high quality, which are nontoxic. My favorite ones are Posca. I personally believe that children should always have access to the highest quality art supplies, because cheap tools invariably lead to bad experiences. Bad experience turns people (and children are people) off from things that could otherwise be enjoyable ...


1

You'll need a thick type of paper. Ordinary bond paper is a bad idea as the markers will bleed through to the surface below. Some art stores sell paper billed as "marker paper". I haven't used them myself but can vouch for bristol paper; I use this to draw my comics and they can absorb markers well. Illustration board is another good choice ...


1

It is very hard to blend colors with markers and you can't use normal paper for it because on rough paper marker spreads so you need a proper sketch paper.


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