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9

If the light is coming from a candle, or group of candles, you're going to have very dramatic chiaroscuro lighting. Shadows should be very black, with not a lot of grey tones. Keep in mind that only the elements very close to the candles are going to be visible. Also, candles have yellow light, so basically all colors are a shade of yellow or orange. ...


8

Unless I am misunderstanding your question, the answer is embedded in the question itself. The purpose of a good gray-scale card is to give you a standardized point of reference for what is true black, true white, and the intermediate shades of gray in between. So if you hold that card up to your subject, the card will be illuminated under the same lighting ...


7

As photographers know, the color of light is usually not white, and when working in your home, you're often working under tungsten bulbs (or similar) which have a warm tone to the light or with fluorescent which have a green cast. Because your brain is pretty good at making what you think should be white look like white, these lights can cause your eyes to ...


6

There are many versions of sunset. What colors will you be using depends on what type of sunset are you planning to paint. It is always the best to go out and observe. As always, I will be talking from my own experience. I would advise you to look at these pages: Munsell color system Why is the sunset red? You will find it very interesting. It will help ...


5

A split primary palette is one that consists of two shades of each primary color: a "warm" one and a "cool" one. The idea is to produce mixtures that are less muddy by reducing contamination from the third primary color. For example, if you want to mix a green that doesn't tend towards brown, you choose a slightly-greenish blue and a slightly-greenish yellow,...


5

What helps me most when drawing is to study a couple inspiration images. I take the time to look very carefully at the colours (for example, when drawing and colouring clouds). In a dim lighting scene, do I really see a darker colour of yellow, or does my brain tell me it is yellow when really the colour looks more blue or gray? For you I would suggest ...


5

You can be a painter, but you should expect to encounter more obstacles and limitations than a person with normal color vision. Have a look at the color wheel: Color wheel If two opposite colors look so similar to you that you would confuse them, you're going to have problems. You may not be able to paint some red or green objects in a realistic way. If ...


5

As a non-native English speaker I'm not too familiar with the expression 'pushing values', but I think the intent goes both ways, that is to say, it doesn't mean pushing them in one direction, but in both (or all) directions. Pushing one's values too far either results in a high-contrast image, where all values have been replaced by binary values (resulting ...


5

Cyan, magenta and yellow are actually the primary colors you should use when painting with inks and paints. (I'm surprised we didn't have this kind of question asked before, because most of us are taught the wrong primary colors in school and by paint manufacturers) Fair warning: the information in the following section is WRONG but it's what most people ...


4

In general, I can't see how color blindness on its own can be a serious barrier. Anyway, overwhelming majority of visual information is carried by strokes, gradients, contrast, i.e. achromatic image. In simple words: most of the time color hues are unimportant for perception of information. Of course color hues may be more important for specific objects, e.g....


4

I can definitely recommend a fine asian gel pen (kind of rollerball). It is precise and very easy to use, unlike many other tools I've tried so far. It's a perfect affordable tool for detailed drawings, like miniatures, doodling, pattern fillings, i.e. things that require precise, fine strokes and points. Of course one can draw anything, but bigger areas ...


4

Shoe dye exists, in versions for leather and suede. They should work reasonably well on natural fibres but the effect on synthetic fibres is less reliable (try applying, leaving to dry, then rinsing well). Any plastic (e.g. vinyl) bits won't take dye. Overall it's crucial to know what your shoes are made of before you start.


4

The answer would be too broad because the different black pigments have all different characteristics as other pigments have in terms of hue/temperature, intensity/tinting, transparency, even value and so on. Here's what Winsor & Newton says about their acrylic blacks: Ivory Black is a brown black of moderate tinting strength recommended for general ...


4

As the answers in your other question (Why do complementary colours desaturate each other?) and the link in the comment by Danielillo address, it will in theory be a perfect grey: the complementary colours will have complementary temperature and value, so, after mixing, any pair of complementary colours will have the same perfectly neutral grey. Of course, ...


4

To get a kind of burnt umber, I think (I can't test it now) you need around 3 parts black, 3 parts red, 1 part blue and 1 part yellow. Let's assume the first picture I found googling for fur is the kind of reference you have: For painting fur, and especially to get a warm glow in your painting, I suggest painting a layer of red (with yellow mixed in as ...


4

I see several probable problems here: You use the wrong "primary" colors The quality of your paints might be low You try to replicate a certain pigment without actually using this pigment Let's look at this problem from the bottom up (from short to long): Wrong pigment Burnt umber is a certain pigment. It's made out of actual brown earth (I think it ...


3

Henry is close, but the problem is that your acrylic is drying Matte. This is also, by the way, a problem with many different kinds of paint, whether they are spray paint, oil paint or acrylic. You can add glossy mediums to the paint, but I have found that painting a varnish (or firnis) on top generally yields more even results. I prefer sennelier gloss UV-...


3

The pallet of a sunset is not just a steady transition from one color to the next. Variations in the air density and the presence of passing clouds add diversity and contrast to every moment of the setting. Even when it is captured in a still image, that static frozen moment contains thousands of colors, tones and intensities. And much of the beauty of a ...


3

Here are some of my solutions Red filter Anything seen though red is unsaturated; this is the easiest way particularly to see the scene to paint as a whole. Some DIY glasses have red lenses, some photo filters and gels too, cellophane plastic, plexiglass, tinted glass, or red light bulbs to light the scene. The cheapest and easiest way by far is to buy ...


3

Note: replace North with South if you are in the Southern hemisphere Generally speaking: aim to draw or paint in North light. North light is that which comes from windows facing North. If you're able, block out light from other windows. But why? Well, the sun is in the South, so windows facing in other directions will have variable light during the day, ...


3

Colorblindness should not impede an artist. "Art" is incredibly open, and you could be successful while avoiding color entirely if you wished. Many past and present day artists have overcome the obstacle of colorblindness in their creative expression. One option, used by some, are to use special glasses that allow someone with colorblindness to see more ...


3

The pink color of the mixed red and white is an optical illusion, similar to how inkjet printers create all the colors from inks of three primary colors by printing combinations of tiny colored dots close together. The color in paint is particles of finely-ground pigments (colored powder), suspended in a liquid that dries into a film. When you mix red ...


3

As fixer1234 correctly explained, white is not simply "colorless" or "transparent", but it reflects light of all colors. By mixing pure red with pure white, you end up with 50% red light combined with 50% all wavelengths combined, which makes the red appear lighter (what we commonly call "pink"). There are 3 dimensional color systems like the Munsell color ...


2

What I have seen in printed drawings, like in newspaper cartoons, it make a dark shadow close to where your light source is, but add less colour farther away. That way you will not need to fill the whole sheet of paper with dark intense pencil lines but you still get the contrast around your light focus bit. As EmRoBeau I do advice you to experiment. Take ...


2

"My first approach is some kind of a black to a dark blue to red to orange to yellow to white." Start by getting rid of the black and the white, as the darkest sunset sky is maybe a deep blue or purple, and lightest part, the sun, is yellow. I suggest you use a photo of a sunset you like to give you an idea of the colors to use.


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