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23

What you're looking for is EVA Craft Foam sheets; these are the typical choice for costumers who want to create leather or metal-look pieces without using leather or metal. They're widely available from most craft stores, typically in the "kid craft" sections under brand names like "Foamies;" lately, more deluxe versions are also ...


15

Wikipedia suggests (and I remembered it from school) that a lot of Hoplite armour was made from "linothorax", a composite made from layers of cloth. So for this you could use actual cloth (old sheets?), or perhaps felt, glued together with a non-toxic wood glue. On the more "affordable" end, you could also try paper mâché mould of ...


14

While working with leather can be difficult, it's a skill you can learn. New, pristine leather is indeed costly, but go try going through local flea markets / second hand shops. It's likely you can find slightly worn out leather jackets or bags that you can reuse. You might also find synthetic leather (which is made out of fabric coated with plastic). It's ...


8

A material made specifically to imitate real leather, with similar properties but for a much more affordable price is 'faux leather' (a.k.a. artificial or synthetic leather). It is still pretty pricey, but probably the closest you can get to a real leather look without having to use actual leather. It's also a lot easier to clean. Like the other suggestions ...


7

Waxed cotton has the weight and drape. Here's a wiki link https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waxed_cotton Another benefit to waxed cotton is its ability to "heal". Once punctured leather, pleather, and vinyl will keep that hole. Also waxed cotton would be great as your mockup so you can tailor and make adjustments.


7

I've glued strong magnets to various other things in an industrial context, and even fairly rigid substrates have a tendency to peal off the magnets. Hot glue is good if it sticks well to both surfaces, and it often doesn't stick very well to things like metal. It's easy to use too -- try it out on scrap materials and you'll be fine. A much better option ...


7

I'd suggest you use leather glue to glue a patch from the inner side (with either leather or cloth - whatever suits the design of your jacket best). You can get creative with that and glue some logo or image instead of just a blunt patch (if so, you can do it on the outer side instead of the inner side). But from what I can visualise the leather is not only ...


6

The double-sided ones are often called "grommets". Good search terms are "fabric grommets" or "fabric grommet tool". Amazon has a huge selection, including different sizes and colors. The grommets consist of two pieces. One is like a shaped washer that goes on the back. The other piece is similar to the eyelets you're using, ...


5

It looks to me like you're conflating the tanning with the dyeing processes: Tanning vs Dyeing Tanning is how you turn a piece of rawhide into leather - it does change the colour, but that's not the main purpose. Dyeing is how you change the colour of an already tanned piece of leather. Telling Veg-tanned and Chrome-tanned leather apart There are two ...


5

Check your local thrift and goodwill stores. You might be able to find a suitable sized duster which only needs a little repair, some leather treatment or a good cleaning to fill the bill. If not, you might find a larger sized leather (or leather-like) garment from which you can harvest enough quality leather to make your costume. If not even that, you ...


5

One thing not on your list is steel wire. This is a sort of steel framing I suppose. But it can do a lot while remaining light and flexible. I would think you want something in spring temper, so perhaps piano wire of sufficient gauge. I suppose whenever I've seen these it's been mild steel though, somewhere around .050-.100" diameter. "U"-shaped members on ...


5

Awls are typically used for punching holes into objects, awls come in different styles. This one in particular, if you look at the back end, looks very durable, and able to be hammered on the back without issues. So it is able to push through thick leather easily. Standard image of an awl: Awl being used to punch hole: Awl being used in practice to lace ...


5

Based on the appearance of the tool (the thick shaft and the guard around it), the person in the video is drawing on the leather using heat, rather than 'cold' etching, carving, or engraving the leather. This is known as pyrography. The tool used here is called a 'solid-point burner'. This tool is attached to a power source, often (and preferably) has ...


4

Take a scrap piece of leather and apply several dots of glue to it, then let them dry. Once they are dry, try each of the following solvents to see which ones remove the glue with a minimum of discoloration to the leather. Then stain the leather to see how the solvent treated leather accepts color. clean water, water with dish-soap, rubbing alcohol, ...


4

So, I did some research, and although I never found anything that specifically said "This is why you shouldn't tool chrome-tanned leather," the information that I did find suggests a reason. Lots of resources describe the difference between chrome- and vegetable-tanning. I think this quote (from the GoldBark Leather site) summarizes things pretty well: ...


4

Looking great by the way so far! Personally when finishing any leather edges, I find the tiniest bit of Eco-flow gum tragacanth (brand not specific but it's just the one I've used) with a quick hand burnish with a cloth gives the best finish. Yes, it's a lot harder and you need elbow grease, but I think it's worth it. I don't usually bother with edge ...


4

The specific tools you need will depend on exactly what you want to do and the material you're working with; the list below covers both the tasks required to make a bag and the tools necessary to complete them, and assumes that you're using normal, veg-tanned, undyed leather. Task: Cutting You'll need some way of cutting the leather to shape. I like to use ...


4

Traditionally leather should be about 1.00 mm thick for bookbinding. I have used leathers that are much thicker as well as leathers that are thinner. The thinner leather poses its' own problems. It can tear quite easily. Years ago I did some bookbinding with some rather thick leather. Probably something comparable to what you have at the moment. You ...


4

Those flexible sheet or strip magnets are made from magnetizable metal particles in a rubbery binder. The mixture is melted and extruded. After it's cooled down, it's magnetized. Since the leather and the magnets can both bend, the adhesive should be something that remains flexible, and bonds with both a porous material like leather, and the rubbery binder ...


4

Bonded leather comes to mind. Bonded leather is made by shredding leather scraps and leather fiber, then mixing it with bonding materials. The mixture is next extruded onto a fiber cloth, or paper backing, and the surface is usually embossed with a leather-like texture or grain. From wikipedia This is already used in clothing, accessories, upholstery ...


3

A few thoughts: If the hole is being destroyed, you may be wearing the belt tighter than the leather will support. If the belt is otherwise in good shape, you may be able to make a cosmetic repair to the hole, then use the belt at the next looser hole. Cosmetic repair: If the leather is torn, try the grommet solution, below, after this repair. If the ...


3

There are specialist leather glues available that are ideal for this application (on Amazon, for example), but if you don't want to buy glue just for one small join then ordinary contact adhesive will do a good job. Epoxy resin will also join the leather, but is less flexible. Many people also swear by Barge cement, but I've not used either so can't really ...


3

Use E V A foam sheets (3mm to 8mm thickness) The EVA has many different uses but for leather crafters it is used for stiffening of bags like laptop bags and also serves for protection. The sheet size is 1m x 2m. EVA foam is a closed cell foam that provide durability and strength.


3

There is a paper/synthetics mix out there which is advertised as vegan leather (I'm sorry, I wasn't able to find this in English). You can wash, iron and sew it, as well as paint on it and iron pictures on it. I worked with it and I have to say it is quite hard and sturdy, but I only washed it at 30°C and did not wrinkle it very well. It has a leathery look ...


3

The general order for treating leather, or at least the one which I use, is as follows: Cut and shape the raw leather. As enderland pointed out, untreated (veg tanned) leather becomes quite supple when soaked and will retain it's form when dry (this technique is known as wet forming, and is probably how the sheath in your picture was shaped). Dye the ...


3

To me the tip looks just like the tool I use to apply edge coat. The little indentations hold the edge coat as you apply it. I’m assuming the pointed end spins? If so that’s what you have, a tool to apply an edge coat. An edge coat is applied as a thick coating to finish any edge on your project. Before that takes place you would burnish the edge with a ...


3

It looks like a multi tool, the very point could be used as a awl as previously said, the part with the indentations to aply all sorts of compounds to the edge end last but not least the end portion resambles a burnishing tool. So its probably a "jack of all trades" tool as commonly found on those kits, its probably not the best for each feature ...


3

A rather natural and realistic looking imitation you can opt for, is real leather that has been made to look like stingray leather. This is bonded leather, and made by pressing leather scraps mixed with a binder, often rubber. This specific imitation is quite hard to find, though. There are also faux leather alternatives (polyurethane and PVC) to this. ...


2

Fake leather (AKA 'pleather') is widely available in your chosen price range, and the weight and texture are (as you'd expect) pretty close. Fake leather isn't nearly as strong as the real thing, but for a coat this shouldn't be an issue.


2

It depends on whether you are a beginner who expects to continue and is starting to build up a collection of tools, or whether you are a beginner who wants to make a single item and does not expect to do more in leather for several (or many) years to come. If that last, making one item only, you do not need much. After you have chosen your leather you can ...


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