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10

I don't believe there is a way to remove the yellow staining but there are a lot of methods to keep it from getting any worse. The reason your paper is turning yellow is because of the quality of paper that was used to make the drawing on. Economical paper is made from wood and not cotton. Chances are you have paper made from a wood pulp. Wood is made up of ...


6

It's unlikely that you'll be able to disguise the holes in any way that's not noticeable; instead, I would recommend looking into the Japanese process "sashiko," a mending process made deliberately visible. Based on your other questions, you are quite new to sewing and embroidery, so you may wish to start with a more simple pattern like the one shown on the ...


5

I don't have any pictures, but I once saw a "restored" print technique which amazed me. The damaged painting was valuable, so the owner didn't want to modify it directly. So he bought two appropriate sized frames and from their parts assembled a single frame with two sheets of protective glass. Then with the painting behind a single sheet of glass, he ...


5

If the scratch is small enough but has discolored edges (like a scratched or chipped glass) then you could rub some vaseline or silicone oil over it to even out the light refraction. If the scratch is deeper, I'm afraid there's not much you can do but grind the stone down and polish it again. Filling the scratch with things like clear nail polish, spray ...


5

Stretching it properly on the right sized frame should be enough to remove the creases, no water required. Properly is: Procuring a support of the right dimensions. The original frame on which the work was painted would be the best. Centering the painting on the support, and tacking (stapling) the work to the frame at the midpoint of each edge. This will be ...


5

I'm not a conservator, so I cannot give you a definite answer. And the answer will depend on the value of the object. If this is a rare remnant of history, do not attempt any restoration and let a professional restorator do their work. In that case, it would be almost illegal to apply epoxy to it, because the process isn't reversable. Most amateurs trying to ...


4

I don’t think you will ever be able to satisfactorily repair a watercolor painting with this kind of damage. Gluing paper is risky, because you will never be able to match the texture and grain perfectly, which will make the repairs stand out even more. Matching the colors would similarly prove challenging -even for a professional. I see two possibilities. ...


4

Let me start with a disclaimer. If it was my box, I wouldn't try to restore it. There's a good chance of turning it into a mess. Right now, it shows the character of age. Trying to restore it could leave you with something very unattractive. The wood seems bare, but if it had any kind of sealer (possibly including the stain), you will end up with a ...


3

Per an email from Araldite customer service: None of our Araldite® products carry food safety certifications (although there are several that would likely be safe for food contact). Best regards Lee On a request for a follow-up on specific formulations that might be safe in contact with hot water, they replied: You could probably use ...


3

You need a Brush Cleaner and Restorer formulated for this task. There are a few of these available, only in art supply stores; you'll want to check with the ones around you to see what you can purchase. If you are in the United States, Winsor & Newton makes a widely available product I have used with great results; it's formulated for dried acrylic and ...


3

This is what I would do if I had to do this: Use fine sandpaper to remove the stickers and the lacquer.* You may want to sand down the scratches as well, but I can’t tell by the photos if that would be a good idea, or that they are too deep (they seem to be so) and trying to fix them would deform the shape of the bat itself. Fill the large crack with wood ...


3

I can tell you with certainty that architecture like this does exist, is still being built and is pretty common in Europe, for example in Halle or Leipzig, Germany. You can also see examples of it in Normandy (France). The technique of mortaring brick and coating it with cement or mud is pretty common. I imagine the biggest problem you will have is finding ...


3

Unfortunately you won't be able to completely "uncrush" the tube again. Remember that we are dealing with cardboard here, which is essentially a mass of compacted fibers. When you create a crease (or two as in your photo), you are effectively destroying the fibers' structure and tearing some of them. Straightening the crease with mean you still have torn ...


3

Goo Gone and similar products work quite well on hard surfaces for removing adhesive residue. You will find that the recommendations for such products also include testing on a hidden portion or similar piece. It's likely that Goo Gone will work and you may be able to soak the fabric in the liquid to allow better penetration. Once soaked for a while, a ...


3

Please do not soak the pickguard in peroxide! That's highly likely to remove or damage the permanent marker signatures since peroxide is a bleaching agent. You might be able to carefully clean around the signatures using a mostly dry small tool with peroxide or other cleaning solution on it, but even then you would run the risk of some of it bleeding over ...


3

b_jonas is on the right path... Take a high quality scan or photo of the discolored work. Then take that scan and in photo editing software correct out the yellowed tone. A decent app will have tools that can make this fairly simple, though you may want to outsource this if you are not familiar with the process. Now make a giclee or high quality inkjet ...


3

Looks like the original plaster covered the wooden base, which makes for excellent repair possibilities. Though removing the existing base may prove tricky. As a result you may not want to remove it at all. As Fixer1234 points out you may run into some additional problems if any of the armature is under tension from how it was attached to the wood, ...


3

It seems, from casting about online, that the use of wool stuffing for refurbishing furniture cushions is somewhat outmoded, even for a restoration project such as yours where authenticity is desired. Other than several blogs mentioning wool when discussing the pros and cons of various cushion materials, especially those which are emphasizing natural ...


3

You're asking a lot to repair that so it isn't noticeable (although if time or cost is no object it could probably be done; I've seen damaged art canvases invisibly repaired with a microscope, surgical tools, and days of work). A more practical strategy might be to hide it in plain sight. Incorporate the repair into something like embroidery. Maybe do ...


3

A less noticable way to repair such a tear is to patch it from behind. Cut a patch of matching fabric that covers the whole gap plus one inch in every dimension. Position the patch behind the tear and hand-sew a few stitches to keep it in place and keep the edges of the tear closed. You should use a contrasting thread color because you need to remove the ...


3

Thought it would be useful to show what I did and the results. So, in the end I: Cleaned the metal corrosion off using vinegar. Initially with a cotton bud but then I switched to gently rubbing using a scouring pad. I checked the vinegar didn't affect the wood/stain first on a small patch underneath first. Oiled the box with mineral oil. I was pretty ...


2

Take high quality digital scans or photographs of it. That won't undo the damage if some of the drawing is already lost, but digital editing may help make the parts of the art that are still there more visible.


2

I suggest concealment. Take a strip of very fine leather and sitch it over the line of metal domes. You might be able to find a cloth that would do the same, but the combination of suppleness and toughness needed would be hard to find in a woven product.


2

Going by a tool we use work, I would try with blowing up a thin narrow balloon inside them. The kind of balloon they use for balloon figures would work. The tool we use at work has a two part beak and uses a cylinder to power the beaks apart. But there we do not need to unbend just cardboard tubes but rolls of material with a card board tube center. I do ...


2

Eucalyptus Oil. Apply with an old tooth brush, scrub gently until the residue starts to loosen, clean the brush with a paper towel and reapply oil until residue is gone. Wash as normal :)


2

When working on the cut edges of a book you need to clamp the pages of the book closed between boards. Making a 'board book board' sandwich. Ideally the boards are as big as the pages of the book and you can clamp them just around the book with separate clamps. Which in turn you can clamp down in a vice, to hold it for you working on it. It is also possible ...


2

I used paint thinner to wash and clean the brush first. And after a while, rinsed with kerosene. That worked and saved my brushes.


2

It may not be pretty but... I sewed the damaged material and used Gorilla glue to attach some leather pieces to both sides. The leather should protect it from the zipper rubbing against it.


2

You can use dry transfer lettering like Chartpak, or Letraset. Basically it is sheets of lettering (the full alphabet with multiples of common letters, plus numbers and symbols) that you can apply via rubbing the plastic sheet on one side, depositing the letter on the surface below the other. They come in a many fonts so you should be able to find one that ...


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