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7

You could cut up an old bike tire. Cut off the sides, and you have a nice strip of actual tire tread. There are lots of different sizes of bike wheel, so you can customize the depth of the tread by choosing between road tire (skinny tire, shallow tread), off-road (much wider tire and deeper, bumpier tread), hybrids (a cross between road and off-road) and ...


6

While I've voted for the answer suggesting bike tyres, here are some alternatives: There are vinyl products that can be painted on (or dipped, but painting is better in this case). A couple of coats of black Plasti-dip, the brand I have here, would work nicely. Cylindrical pieces of black latex of the right sort of size are available - drysuit replacement ...


6

You would want a flexible adhesive, as the rubber soles will have some movement throughout its thickness. A good quality contact cement will bond well with both the rubber and with the wood, as long as you have a clean smooth surface on the wood. The rubber should also be cleaned with a solvent such as denatured alcohol or acetone, to ensure there is no ...


3

Have you considered topstitching? Stitching down all the edges that you want to have a crease in them will offer a mechanical fastener, in the form of thread, to keep the folds in place. This sidesteps the rubber's resistance to being holding a crease. You can test how it would look by attaching clothes pins or similar along where you would topstitch.


2

Acrylic paints, or modified acrylic paints, are often used to color latex, but not for what you want to do. Latex is a little finicky. Many colorants will cause it to do unwanted things, like coagulate quickly into a sticky, gloppy mess, fail to dry properly, or change its characteristics. There are colorants designed specifically for latex. My ...


2

When you suggest that you are using foam rubber, the term invokes many different types of materials with the same name. The density and stiffness of the various choices provide some challenge to a good design. The better options include neoprene and also EVA foam. The latter is relatively inexpensive and can be found in the form of floor cushion squares ...


2

You'll need something that's highly durable and flexible, but won't decrease the performance of your fins too much. It seems you're best off with a rubber(izing) paint or rubber coating/liquid rubber, which is "heat, chemical, weather, and impact resistant, as well as being flexible". Last but not least, according to the linked page, since they are ...


1

I bought a piece of 1/16" rubber sheet. Glued it to bottom of old pad on sander. https://www.dropbox.com/s/1ggm4j56fym0mdl/20180827_122005.jpg?dl=0 Because of the extra thickness, the sand paper is a little harder to fit between clamps.


1

I can’t advise you on the glue but I made my own wooden geta a few years ago and I used rubber from an old winter automobile tire. It’s a great material for soles - it hasn’t worn out at all. (I first used the rubber from old sneakers but that just wore out in less than a week). So, that’s something to consider.


1

There's a technique I've used for a similar requirement that doesn't require thermoforming or vacuum forming. You end up with a flexible, rubbery dome (or other shape per the mold). The first step is to stretch a stretchy cloth material over the mold (needs to be a convex mold for this, where you can stretch the cloth over the outside). Stretch it where ...


1

I'm not aware of any flexible rubbers which can be formed by vacuforming. In my experience, when you start with a flat sheet of flexible rubber and press it against a mold, it pretty much returns to being a flat sheet of rubber when the pressure is released. You can however cast flexible rubber (in liquid form) into a mold with your desired hollow ...


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