8

Yes, using upholstery vinyl for bookbinding is certainly a possibility. I got a large reem of it from my grandfathers and was curious if it would work. I found my result to be satisfactory (see pictures below). The part that concerned me was the stiffness difference between my leather books and my new upholstered book. It still opens and closes fine but it ...


7

Definitely don't attempt to repair it yourself - I can't tell for sure from the photo, but I think this is a hollow back binding. In this style of binding the covers and the spine were build directly on the book block, not glued together separately and "hung" into the covers as is done with modern hardcovers. That makes fixing a (partially) detached cover ...


6

You can take a stack of paper and press them together between 2 wooden boards, making sure that one of the short sides sticks out a few mm. You then cover the side of the paper that sticks out with bookbinders glue (PVA glue) and let it dry before you unclamp the stack of paper. You'll end up with a nice noteblock with allows you to pull of sheets of ...


5

If you are looking to add signatures to a completed sewn binding, you would have to unpick the binding, add the signatures, then re-sew the binding. Individual pages (leaves) cannot be sewn into the signature unless they have an excess at the binding edge which you can fold into the signature crease. Without the excess, you will need to glue the leaf to ...


5

"Normal" signatures are often 4 pages, but with 160grams paper, I prefer signatures of 2 since it makes the book lay more flat. It also helps to make a very sharp fold.


5

I would strongly consider what is usually used for covers in these types of books. Hardboard or millboard. They are both similar materials that I would suggest for this. Unfortunately their names are sometimes used interchangeably so I would like to clarify a little what they are. Then you should be able to make a informed choice. Millboard is what you ...


4

A quick Google search revealed that Very generally, "leaves" refers to the pages of a book, as in the common phrase, "loose-leaf pages." A leaf is a single sheet bound in a book, and a leaf has two pages. (Source: Biblio) A folded grouping of leaves is a "gathering", so the left image under "leaf with 4 pages" in your question is actually a ...


4

Traditionally leather should be about 1.00 mm thick for bookbinding. I have used leathers that are much thicker as well as leathers that are thinner. The thinner leather poses its' own problems. It can tear quite easily. Years ago I did some bookbinding with some rather thick leather. Probably something comparable to what you have at the moment. You ...


4

I have used both of these when I bound my hardcover books. I am unsure if either of these are what you have pictured though Bookbinding cloth Also known as book cloth or Japanese book cloth. These are paper backed materials, which make it good for applying adhesives, and usually are made special designs. I have use this for just the spine for flair and to ...


4

After about a week of scouring the web I found a forum that mentions using an HP Photosmart Pro B9180. This is a semi-pro printer. It has an option for a straight paper path and can print on items up to 1.5mm thick which is enough for my 42pt paperboard media stock. It is no longer made so you have to go to the used market. Refurbished units seem to be ...


4

I used to do bookbinding for several years and never had any problems with using bare hands. I only used latex gloves when repairing fragile books and/or paper. If you are using new, clean and strong paper, I would not hesitate to recommend using bare hands in your bookbinding process. You should not experience any detrimental effects on the paper you use,...


4

When using 120 grams paper, it's best to use several signatures/booklets of 4 pages each. Then you can sew these together using a bookbinding technique (I like coptic binding - YouTube has great tutorials). If you don't want to use a different bookbinding technique, you can make your booklet flatter by folding all the folded pieces separately and making ...


4

You could punch holes through the leaves, and sew, using an asian-style bind, or use overcast sewing before binding. You will need an awl, or drill/drill press to punch holes through the paper before sewing, though, and of course, you're losing more of the edge of the paper than using folded signatures and the book won't open flat. But you will have a ...


4

I suggest using sheets of clear PVC: It's non-adhesive, a lot more durable than the more common polypropylene sheets (like the perforated 'punched pockets'), but still supple. They mostly come in standard sizes, like in the image, pre-folded and stitched to accommodate certain book size standards (as an example, the page from which I sourced the image has ...


4

It looks like a low-budget operation using a one-size-fits-none cover stock, or they got the wrong size covers. The cover spine is too wide. As long as it's stiff, it will continue to pull on the page seams. I would try these two steps: The original glue location is visible where it came apart. Put a narrow bead of glue in the same location (Elmer's ...


3

This sounds like a much better candidate for honing your book-repair/book-binding skills. If your goal is solely to increase the book's durability, then you have several options available... If the book is recently published, it may be available as an e-book. Author's will sometimes offer discounted e-book versions of their books to owners of physically ...


3

After stage 3 saw shallow slots across the spine, then glue strings (cords) into the slots. I would use PVA glue myself, but maybe contact cement works better for you? I would also glue a backing onto the spine over the first layers of glue and the cords. I have used fabric but have also used cartridge paper both successfully. Having said the above I will ...


3

I looked into this years ago when I was printing out some books to test my leather binding skills. Back then you likely would have used dedicated software to perform this function. Software has changed since then and Adobe Reader DC does this as well as InDesign from what I gather. Depending on your Acrobat version it should be able to do this well. In ...


3

I think that your most important step is the sanding of the binding edge. You want to "ruffle up the fibres," adding surface area for the glue to stick to, but most importantly, you want to sand the edges enough so that they are all affected evenly--to the point that all of the signature edges are part of the same plane. Believe it or not, in commercial ...


3

You've not provided much in the way of your available equipment and skills, and the task you've set for yourself has substantial supporting requirements. A book press is top of the list. You can build your own, with appropriate research, tools and materials, or you can purchase one to fit your needs. A book press is used to compress paper pages, but can ...


3

You might consider Kraft-Tex® Paper. Many people are using it for bookbinding. It is also used for making wallets, purses, even luggage. It is ultra-durable (virtually rip-proof), can be sewn like fabric, and embellished in many ways including printing. Here is the description written by the manufacturer, C&T Publishing: Wait until you get your ...


3

I don't know if there's a "standard" glue for this, but I would try rubber cement (regular solvent-based type, not water-based). It doesn't warp the paper like water-based glues, and doesn't leave chunks like glue sticks can do. The layer dries to a small fraction of the thickness applied, so variations in application thickness aren't visible. With two ...


3

Most likely, the stains appear because the glue diffuses into the paper - the paper being porous, or the glue too strong / dissolving. Try a different paper / glue combination. About the wrinkles: I guess that you make the binding manually - as in using the bare hands, without any kind of presses, clamps, etc. Use the proper tools, practice using those tools ...


2

If you have a LaTeX distribution on your computer and are not afraid of using a terminal the programme pdfjam is quite handy for creating booklets from PDF files. You can choose the signature size and get as output a pdf file containing all pages ordered in a way so that when printed contains the pages for all the signatures. More information about this ...


2

I ended up using the coptic binding and it went surprisingly well. The only thing about it is that (unlike the Japanese binding) it needs something to hold the notebook close (but it has 8 x A4 sections, after all). It seems that, being similar to the coptic binding in a way, the section sewn hardcover binding would have also been a good choice. Contrary to ...


2

There are machines for doing perfect binding on a small scale. They start in roughly the $50-$100 price range, and go up from there. They're generally "thermal" (they heat a strip of hot melt glue in the binding). If you search "thermal binder", you'll find a bunch of options. Here's a random, low-cost example from Amazon just as an illustration: Source ...


2

Thanks everyone for great suggestions. I learned something new from each one of them and intend to use the learnings in my future projects. For this one, I ended up doing it my own way. I am happy to report that it worked out quite well. First, I built a simple rig (what a big word for what it actually is) - basically a shallow cardboard box tilted so one ...


2

A Comparison of Two Possible Solutions: Binding the larger papers, scrapbooking the smaller ones: You have thought of the unconventional idea of binding the larger memorabilia pages and then using scrapbooking techniques to secure the smaller pages within that bound book. Unfortunately, it is possible that the bulk that would be added with this technique ...


2

Book binding with hot glue? It is true that professionals do use hot glue on paperbacks, but they do not offer better results than other methods. EVA (Ethylene Vinyl Acetate) Hot Glue I have experimented with hot glues, but don’t recommend them for beginners. They are harder to work with and don’t offer any long term benefits over the cold glues I have ...


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