23

What you're looking for is EVA Craft Foam sheets; these are the typical choice for costumers who want to create leather or metal-look pieces without using leather or metal. They're widely available from most craft stores, typically in the "kid craft" sections under brand names like "Foamies;" lately, more deluxe versions are also ...


15

Wikipedia suggests (and I remembered it from school) that a lot of Hoplite armour was made from "linothorax", a composite made from layers of cloth. So for this you could use actual cloth (old sheets?), or perhaps felt, glued together with a non-toxic wood glue. On the more "affordable" end, you could also try paper mâché mould of ...


14

While working with leather can be difficult, it's a skill you can learn. New, pristine leather is indeed costly, but go try going through local flea markets / second hand shops. It's likely you can find slightly worn out leather jackets or bags that you can reuse. You might also find synthetic leather (which is made out of fabric coated with plastic). It's ...


13

Fascinating project. The solution was right in your question; make it like a cracker — flour. You're essentially making a sturdy paste instead of a glue. I mixed: 3 parts sand 1 part all-purpose or bread flour Water, just enough to wet the sand I drained off any excess water, packed it into a mold and let it dry in the sun (1-2 hours?). I guessed ...


8

For a few reasons, I'd go with holiday ornaments. These are available in clear plastic, rather than glass, which is less of a breakage worry. They're also cheaper and lighter than glass jars. And they're already nicely spherical! an example from Michaels craft store Ditch the metal collar and ring. Fill with a colored epoxy resin. Add a decorative cork. ...


8

I recommend that you ignore the depth of the V in your v-neck shirt and cut the square where you want it to be (allowing for seams, obviously). Then, using the cut-out material, you can use it as a modesty panel to fill in the space where the tip of the V is to make a full square neck. What you do with this notch is up to you. You can try to make it blend ...


8

This is washi tape. I often keep some on hand. Ha ha, let’s test it on my hand. It stays on for a while, but doesn’t bend like adhesive bandages. So, once the edge pops up, it is compromised. Sweat or moisture will not keep it on. Removing it once compromises it as well. It might stick for a while depending on movement.


8

A material made specifically to imitate real leather, with similar properties but for a much more affordable price is 'faux leather' (a.k.a. artificial or synthetic leather). It is still pretty pricey, but probably the closest you can get to a real leather look without having to use actual leather. It's also a lot easier to clean. Like the other suggestions ...


7

Plaster that is thick enough to be reasonably strong and rigid will probably be too heavy. Masks are often made from papier mache, essentially building up strips of paper soaked in paste over a former which dried to a fairly strong but lightweight material. Other methods involve pressing paper pulp into a mould. You could also use your plaster original ...


7

For this Lego Batman costume, we covered the eyeholes with white gauze (ok, actually patches cut from some old pantyhose). Vision was only very slightly reduced -- much more so by the small eye openings (and loss of peripheral vision) than by the gauze.


6

In theatrical use on a larger scale, scrim is used for this sort of thing. It's a fairly open-weave fabric. Unless black, it reflects light when illuminated from the same side as the viewer, but transmits light to the dark side. Black scrim is often used in the eyes (or mouth) of character suits so the occupant can see out. You can see quite clearly ...


5

You totally can make your own wigs Are cosplay wigs generally handmade, or bought and then customized? Yes and Yes or a combination of both. When you need to get a certain style of wig for a character it can be hard to find that perfect wig online or at a costume shop either due to availability or budget. So making your own could be a useful skill you have ...


5

A retracting telescope typically has 3 or 4 segments that retract into one another, although the insecure pirate may feel the need to get a longer one. The key features of the section diameters is that they slide easily past one another but will not fall apart when extended. In other words, you need a "stop" that prevents the larger segment from completely ...


5

I believe the closest analog you'll find for human sized PVC pipe that wouldn't be PVC pipe is called concrete form tubes, sometimes under the brand name Sonotube. The Home Depot version is called Sakrete form tube. It's going to be lighter than PVC of human size, but that doesn't mean it will be light. As it is constructed of cardboard, it would be easily ...


5

The concept being used in this example is the same as that which is used for perforated vehicle window wraps, frequently used for advertising on buses and business vehicles. According to this web site, Streamline Print and Design, perforated vinyl is the key: Perforated vinyl is exactly what the name says, a sheet of vinyl material with a pattern of ...


5

I'm not really going to address your question, but the underlying problem. The fact that costumes usually look like costumes and not like "legit" outfits, is because they are produced for temporary use: their cheap materials (and often cheap manufacture) keep prices at a minimum. You can indeed improve on the fabric, but, combined with the working hours ...


5

A "costume" looks like a cheap costume because it is made with cheap, unsuitable materials using quick assembly techniques with minimal finishing; if you want it to look "legit," you have to approach it as actual apparel, not as a "costume," and you'll have to spend some money on the materials, as well as time on the construction. "Cheap" fabrics will not ...


5

To be absolutely honest, the difference is marginal in most (but not all) cases. You probably won't even notice any difference in: short sleeves wide or baggy garments (like a tunic or pirate blouse) garments where the shoulder seam extends far down the shoulder (like a kimono or most casual menswear) garments sewn from stretchy fabric Puffy sleeves that ...


4

While papier-mache is undoubtedly the easiest way to make this type of 'plague doctor masks', the originals were made of leather and if you have the skills/tools/patience to do so you may find that you prefer the look (if not the weight) of the results. There are several tutorials and patterns available - see here and here.


4

for the bottles consider perfume or liquor bottles for home bottling they come in a wide variety of materials, shapes, and sizes. Make sense toys in the UK has some plastic play potion bottles on various sizes and colors. for a "liquid" gel for gel candles could be a good choice, you will never find a truly lightweight liquid but it looks very realistic ...


4

My go-to materials for something like this would be craft foam or Worbla. These two materials are easily heat-formed into lightweight, reasonably sturdy pieces. For craft foam, a gas stove or heavy duty hair-dryer can be used as the source of heat, but for Worbla something more substantial like a heat gun is ideal. I'd recommend first making a pattern for ...


4

Rather than paint, which might peel weirdly on you, another option is to use inkjet transparency film and print the color you want on it and then affix it the acrylic. Walmart sells, and there's likely other sources, an adhesive inkjet printable transparency film that might do the trick. A lot less fussy too...


4

My daughter is also an active cosplay ((anime) costume play) artist. She buys her wigs on eBay, usually for $10 or so. A quick search there on 'cosplay wig' brings up many alternatives. They tend to come from China, so order early to allow for a couple weeks shipping. She has also ordered one or two from Amazon, I think primarily for quicker delivery (same-...


3

I found a good article which considers various different glues and compares their performances when used to glue small crystals to various different types of material. It appears to be an updated version of this slightly older article from the same website. Neither article mentions satin specifically, but the later one considers some similar materials, and ...


3

I used to larp and always opted for coats/jackets rather than cloaks whenever feasible. Here are the considerations I used to make frequently about outerwear, listed from highest to lowest priority for myself: It is easier to add useable pockets (whether hidden or visible) Fitted garments with sleeves are less likely to get caught in doors or get ...


3

If you don't mind the slightly "Raggedy Ann" look of the finished product, yarn wigs are pretty easy and fun. Here's how I make a yarn wig: Tie one end of the yarn to something (I use a slat in one of our dining chairs) Wrap the yarn around the chair (or whatever you're using) until the "wig" seems big enough. When it seems big enough, hold part of the wig ...


3

A couple options appear for your objective. Substitute sewing with fabric glue and apply sparsely. Most bandages of the sort you have pictured are elastic and would not take well to sewing, as you've noted. By the same token, they would also not take well to heavy adhesive application. One would apply dots of adhesive spaced along the edges where overlapped,...


3

As a basic strategy, you might consider having the elastic/spring hold the mouth open, and use something controlled by your mouth to close it when you close your own mouth. That way you could make him talk in a realistic way by simply opening your mouth each time you say a word, which of course you'd want to do anyway :) As far as mechanism is concerned, a "...


3

If I didn't have the fifty bucks to buy one from a costume supply and had the time and patience to create; my affordable project would need: old adjustable ball cap Velcro or leather boot laces (laces are more attractive) Hot glue or stapler cardboard (not corrugated, unless in a pinch) metal stud from Thrift Store or Dry wall nails Pleather, naugahide, or ...


3

Just for the filling, why not use jelly (Jello/gelatine)? It's available in a wide range of colours (or get plain and use food dye) and won't leak. You can take this idea a bit further: Bubbles using soda water A slightly runny mix (higher water content than usual) so it moves more Use more than one colour, or plain and coloured A top layer of clear with ...


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