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6

Evenly spaced stitches means that the number of stitches between increases is approximately the same. Since you are increase 50 sts over 94 current stitches, and 94/50=1.88 you should put (on average) 1.88 sts between increases. That means your increases will be done in some combination of (m1,k1) and (m1,k2) repeats. There are helpful calculators available ...


4

You may have luck with hitches or whippings. The former tends to involve attaching a rope to something, such as a piece of wood. The latter finishes the end of a rope to keep it from fraying, or finishes a piece of wood...to keep it from splintering? Both tend to have styles that can be repeated down a bit of wood making them both more secure and more ...


4

You don't need to work with cord that spans the length of your entire project You have a couple of options that depend on what aesthetic you are trying to achieve and what you are willing to accept as far as look. Adding cord with knots There is a family of knots used to add in new cords to your project. Mostly suggested as a means of adding more colours or ...


3

It seems like every pin/bead is connected to only three opposite. So I guess the job is to divide the circle into the number of beads/pins and to connect them using only three strings per each :)


2

I googled 'fork made pompom' and now understand better what you are asking about. This is the random site I used, (as I prefer still pictures over videos.) I have no connection to this site. There are four options for mistakes I see: Not enough windings for the size of your yarn compared to your fork. Not pulled together enough when tying the middle. Too ...


2

As @abbie has explained, yarn is created by using twist to "stick" short fibers (of wool, or cotton, or hemp, or linen, or...) together to make a longer strand. When you spin yarn, you have to add twist to connect all of the shorter individual fibers together into a continuous longer piece of yarn. The more twist you add, the stronger the individual strand ...


2

In many macrame projects you mostly tie with only a part of the ends, the rest are just there waiting for their turn. Your knitting fish work well for the 'waiting' ends, making the few that work at the time less likely to get in tangles. Or, if you do not have those fish, bundle the string and tie the end around it or use a small elastic band. When ...


2

I suspect that the string goes through holes in the backing where the pins/beads are so the string also travels on the back side of the pattern which is what allows you to have three strands going to one point. I further suspect that the 'beads' are ball ended pins which also go through the same holes.


1

The specific knot isn't critical as long as the knot has the functionality. There are endless choices, so you can pretty much pick one that you find attractive as long as it is a type that doesn't slip (and any knot reference will describe that characteristic). However, you will need to deal with the issue of any knot attached as described in the question ...


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