7

Unlike natural fibers which can be blocked by simply shaping the item while wet, blocking acrylic requires heat. Many people try to wet-block acrylic the same way they would do wool, and they aren't happy with the results so they conclude (incorrectly) that there's no point in blocking acrylic. That's not true. There's simply very little point in wet ...


6

Evenly spaced stitches means that the number of stitches between increases is approximately the same. Since you are increase 50 sts over 94 current stitches, and 94/50=1.88 you should put (on average) 1.88 sts between increases. That means your increases will be done in some combination of (m1,k1) and (m1,k2) repeats. There are helpful calculators available ...


5

"Rnd 11: Join legs as follows: Ch 8, sc around the 9 sts of first leg, working in ch 8, sc 8, sc 9 sts of second leg, working in front loop only of ch-8, sc in next 8 ch - 34 sts." Here are the instructions broken down into separate steps. In parentheses at the end of each step is how many stitches you should have created since the start of the ...


3

Just a few thoughts: Embroidery is usually done on a plain canvas. If the background has too much of a pattern, the embroidery will simply fade into the background. You'll want a very plain and even crochet stitch for the afghan. Use unicolor yarn for the afghan or the embroidery might fade into the background. If you'd like the afghan to have more of a ...


3

If you want to continue increasing a pattern worked in the round such as the one given, the key is to look for the pattern of increases in what's been given. The increases, where multiple stitches in a round are worked into a single stitch in the previous round, are what give the pattern its growth in each subsequent, larger round; I personally find them ...


3

The usual way to combine these 'squares' is to make many and stitch them together into a blanket. In your irregular 'square' you may find they do not fit together well or at all in the usual pattern. You can try out how the pieces fit together by cutting out a series of paper versions. Select your pattern, make at least 10 realisticly shaped paper (or real) ...


2

I haven't done a ton of blocking, but since I can't wear wool I've done mostly acrylic when I do have something to block. It's true that you may not need to block it, but that's not a general rule for all scarves. If the corners are curling or there are slight width changes along the length, I would try to block that smooth. The pattern may also say ...


2

I hope you were able to find a good solution! I know that with the kind of skeins that Matt linked, you'll almost always get a frustrating (and huge) amount of yarn barf. Once I had nearly half a skein of it because the center-pull line got tucked into a weird place! Anyway, I've found that a good solution, if you don't have a yarn winder and don't intend ...


1

I think it is safe: these blankets are made from soft material and most yarn stretches. It is far more likely that the yarn will tear than that it causes injury. Also, these holes are much larger than a baby's fingers or toes. For baby proofing: use yarn that is recommended for babies' stuff! (For example, no yearn that give bleeds colour, no unsafe ...


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