5

Green dop wax is best. Don't use glue. I read something about colour loss up there, god knows what they are on about this is untrue. Opal is relatively soft, treat it with care. To get the stone off again, leave it in the freezer for half an hour to harden the wax, it will pop off. I grew up on the field in Lightning Ridge and found, cut and sold my first ...


5

There are lapidary materials that can be cut without using specialized saws. Small raw gemstones are not good candidates, however. Prior to modern lapidary equipment, cutting small gemstones relied on understanding, and taking advantage of, a stones natural cleavage. This method gives very little flexibility as to how and where you cut, and will result in ...


5

You may have some luck with stabilizing it as though it was a slab. Using an epoxy in acetone method: Dissolve epoxy in acetone Submerge rough stone in the epoxy acetone mixture Seal up container so acetone does not evaporate Leave in mixture for at least a week Remove from acetone and let dry for at least another week Mindat has some good instructions ...


5

If the scratch is small enough but has discolored edges (like a scratched or chipped glass) then you could rub some vaseline or silicone oil over it to even out the light refraction. If the scratch is deeper, I'm afraid there's not much you can do but grind the stone down and polish it again. Filling the scratch with things like clear nail polish, spray ...


4

Just thinking out loud here. Rotate the pendant 90 degrees. Solder hooks on the opposite side mirroring the two on the other side. Add the new chain. Attach the chains together with loops. Done.


4

You can definitely mix the quartz waste with epoxy. In fact, it can be mostly waste, with just enough epoxy to bind it together. Mix thoroughly so all of the quartz is covered with epoxy and there aren't pockets of quartz powder. It's also helpful to press the mixture into shape to force it together and eliminate tiny gaps and air pockets (you want a ...


3

It's hard to diagnose without seeing the bit you used, but here are my ideas: Orientation The line in the center of your image has only one chipped edge on one side. That implies that the problem either arises at the side where the tool starts touching the glass or leaves the glass. If you turn the glass (or the tool) so that the rotation of the bit is ...


3

The purpose is to prepare a flake for improved manipulation. Abrasion is a process also referred to as 'raking': Raking is the action of carefully dragging a course abrader or other device to remove "micro" flakes from the edge of a biface or preform to change it's [sic] shape or give support to an edge before actual abrading is done prior to percussion ...


3

It seems that, according to their website, your Diamond Pacific Genie is able to flatten and polish gemstones using the "right hand wheel" as a platform for, e.g., "Lapcraft "No Hole" discs [like this one]. They screw into the right hand wheel adaptor of the Genie, giving you a 6" diameter lap with no bothersome center hole.&...


3

I know this is an old question, but another option that you might consider is sawing off the existing rings with a jeweler's saw, smoothing the side, and then setting the entire stone with the existing electroplated bezel into a new setting. @Chris Johns is right...you can't resolder the piece because of the potential for damage to the stone. You can ...


2

The problem with soldering anything to the existing mounting is that you run the risk of the heat damaging the stone, most minerals are both brittle and have poor thermal conductivity so anything other than very slow and even heating is likely to crack them. It might be better to make up a flat plate the same size as the back of the mount with a loop at ...


2

Based upon discussion with some other opal cutters, what I've wound up doing is to use simple white glue to dop the opal (frequently to the head of a nail, instead of a wooden dowel, but for larger opals a dowel works well enough). I then apply a thin seal of instant glue ("crazy glue") as a seal around the base of the opal, to protect the white glue from ...


2

Opals from the Lightning Ridge area of Australian are known for being very high-water-content. Unfortunately, this makes them the most susceptible to heat cracking and related damage. The danger is not just in color loss — you can crack or crumble stones from this region much more easily than opal from other regions. You can read the same in Eckert's "...


2

A doublet in this case being faux gemstone composed of two bonded layers of different materials, usually glass supporting a softer rare stone. You would need perfectly flat surfaces on the bond to get this to work, so if your tools cannot provide that then the answer would be no.


2

Most common would be a rotary bit. This one would be specifically for glass carving: Amazon link The bottom row would be the fine detail tips, would be beneficial to wanting to carve out small detail. Brand wise, you really can't go wrong with a rotary bit. I have been in the tool industry for about five years. Yes, you can get really high quality rotary ...


2

I would strongly advise to not just cut any gemstones without expert knowledge. The issue is not just hardness but chipping. Different gemstones react very different to impact or stress and can easily break or chip. One exception is amber for example because it's very soft and can be worked on without much risk of damage. Most stones are not that easy ...


1

You can try the windshield repair resin to hold the loose chip. Citrine is a form of quartz, which is the primary component of normal glass, so a resin designed to match the refractive index of windshield glass might not be visible. I don't think it will work for an internal crack in a gemstone, though. The resin won't seep into the crack under normal ...


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