10

The angle between the ruler part and the the semicircular part is the same as the angle indicated on the scale. This is because the centreline of the ruler is parallel to its edge. In more detail: Image from Wikimedia Commons user Krishnavedala Consider line a to be the top edge of the ruler in the picture and line b the centreline. Line t, the ...


8

Only a few microwave ovens control the microwave power level on essentially a continuous basis. That is, if you set the power level at 30%, the oven runs at 30% power output. Most are based on turning the microwave power on at 100% for a given portion of a fixed time increment, like 30 seconds or 1 minute. Then the microwave power shuts off for the ...


8

There are a few tricks of the trade for using tape on drawing paper. Here are some of them: Use good quality paper. Try using different types of tape to see which kind works best with the type of paper you're using. Stick the tape to your pants one or more times before sticking it to the paper. Don't leave the tape on the paper for more than 24 hours. ...


7

Masking tape is the general term for a kind of tape for masking off parts of a range of materials (wood, stone, glass, concrete, &c.). The glue will need to have a certain level of bonding (often pressure-bonding) with the surface for it to stay in place and keep the paint from covering - or seeping in on - that surface. The amount of bonding is ...


7

it seems that you are inserting the bit in correctly, it just seems like it's not going in straight some of the times. Besides being careful when inserting the bit, I'm not sure how else to guarantee the bit is set straight without some additional tests. If you want to make sure the bit is in correctly without damaging your ornament, after you insert the bit ...


6

When you have a row of slipped stitches that are too tight to fit back onto the original needle, you can pick them up on a different needle, such as: Use a much smaller knitting needle. Eg, if you knitted originally on US size 8 needles (5.0 mm), use a US size 4 (3.5 mm) or smaller needle to pick the stitches up. The smaller needle should fit easily through ...


5

An alternative solution is to unravel another row stitch by stitch and insert the needle into the loop that was just freed of the previous stitch. I found this technique especially usefull for more complicated patterns where stitches are added or knit together or crossed. Take a close look at the top row: it's composed of small loops that usually sit on the ...


5

Working with my very basic press, I'd clamp the two pieces together very well, and drill all the pilot holes. Then separate the pieces and open out the clearance holes. I wouldn't go straight in with a 6mm drill in steel anyway. Note that you'll need a little over 6mm for a clearance hole. 6.5mm is common though might be too loose for you. In thin aluminium ...


5

If your hands start hurting or feeling sore, take a break. Listen to your body - if something hurts, it needs to rest. Otherwise, you can risk permanently injuring/disabling yourself. One artist whom I follow, Yuumei, has shared her experience with this: https://www.deviantart.com/yuumei/journal/PSA-for-Artists-Don-t-make-the-same-mistake-I-did-577426340. I ...


5

Oooh, I used to have one of these as a kid - not the whole set, sadly, but the compass itself and a few of the accessories. Congratulation on the purchase, it's a very satisfying tool to use. I inherited it in early 00s and it got me through 8 years of geometry classes; I vastly preferred it to the modern versions. First row "Liner" If I'm correct (it's ...


4

I'm embarrassed to not have noticed it sooner, but I found the reason. I was pushing the shafts of the accessoirs in until I felt them touching a hard surface, but it was not the exact center of the back of the receiving sleeve. From what I could feel (I cannot look in there) there's a funnel-like structure at the back with steps instead of a smooth surface....


3

I'm not sure why it is lightening: is the paper showing? Does the paper have enough 'tooth' or grip to begin with? How hard are you pressing into the paper and pastel? I've found gentle pressure with fingertip is enough. With softer (more expensive pastels) they tend to be the easiest to blend. If you have not tried a high-quality pastel like Schminke, then ...


3

If you are "very concerned", talk to your General Practitioner MD. He may refer you for physical therapy. Therapists have access to many writing assistive technologies. I have used (and still do sometimes) different rubber tubes, slipped over pens, pencils, etc. They relieve my hand pain, which is due to a neurological injury. Be sure your PC environment ...


3

Couple of things you could try: What I usually do: Get your two pieces of steel aligned clamp the diagonal opposite corners with vice grips. Drill the other two diagonal holes 5mm, (you will need a wooden block or some thin parallels (25 x3mm alum strip works a treat) in your vice), half drill the two 5mm holes with 6mm drill. (n.b. if you are going to use ...


3

No, a stand is not required but it does give you some more options. A stand that you can clamp the flex shaft tool into can give you hands free access to it, like a mini buffer/grinder. Even without that possibility, it gives the tool a secure place to rest when between uses. Keep in mind that it is a relatively heavy tool with a spinning chuck on the end ...


3

It's hard to diagnose without seeing the bit you used, but here are my ideas: Orientation The line in the center of your image has only one chipped edge on one side. That implies that the problem either arises at the side where the tool starts touching the glass or leaves the glass. If you turn the glass (or the tool) so that the rotation of the bit is ...


2

In retrospect, I don't know how I missed it, but here are the details for anyone else wondering: Pulling the feeding arm extends the spring. When the arm is pulled all the way back, it's locked. At this point, rotating the sharpener crank (without a pencil) will release the lock, and cause the arm to spring back all the way in. But instead we keep the arm ...


2

Don't worry about drafting tape if you can't find it in your area. A common hack - peel masking tape, stick it a couple of times on another surface (say, your hand) to remove some adhesive, and then use it on the paper. Make sure the initial surface is clean, though, we don't want dirt on the paper ;)


2

Most common would be a rotary bit. This one would be specifically for glass carving: Amazon link The bottom row would be the fine detail tips, would be beneficial to wanting to carve out small detail. Brand wise, you really can't go wrong with a rotary bit. I have been in the tool industry for about five years. Yes, you can get really high quality rotary ...


2

For something of this sort, you'll either construct one yourself, or repurpose a common item from another resource. The first thought that popped into my alleged mind is a coaster, something with a reasonably solid bottom layer to prevent puncture and also to provide grip, and an upper layer with material suitable to hold the compass point. Even a sheet of ...


2

To place this protractor or any measuring tool at a difficult to see point use a stylus such as a pencil or an awl or the metal tip of a compass. Place the point of the stylus on the given point and slide the protractor's two beams against it so that it rests at their intersection. If the stylus is too thick you may need to angle it away from the protractor ...


2

People with arthritis and various other ailments and injuries that affect their hands increase the size of what they hold. This lets you use more of your hand to hold the pen and apply less pressure. The common technique is to stick the pen into some form of foam or rubber grip, or even a rubber ball. I have no idea how compatible this would be with the ...


2

I suspect you're heating fairly small quantities. If so another way (in addition to Fixer1234's answer) to reduce the power reaching your material is to heat something else at the same time. This could be scrap material, or it could be a cup of water (with a loose lid if you want to minimise steam). Very very roughly the energy should be absorbed in ...


1

The pic from the NeilMed Instructions shows something that is important to know about microwave ovens, “Previously heated microwaves will produce much more energy.” I wanted to have an official citation for this fact. This is the disinfection process for a neti pot or neti rinse. In fact, I have experienced melting the plastic from using the microwave too ...


1

You may want to consider using a wrist brace while writing. It'll constrict your writing, so you'll need to practice with it before doing something that needs to look perfect. You can also search for "writing brace" to find something that's a little less obtrusive. I've seen something that you can rest your hand on while you write that allows you to move ...


1

Something I have done is soaking my hands in warm water (not lukewarm, not boiling hot, just as much heat as you can handle) before, after, and in between the periods of writing (say, taking a break for half an hour or so). I did that for many of my long writing projects in school. Another, slightly foolish trick would be trying to hold the pen with all ...


1

With such a wide range of collets... are you sure you have the right one for the bit? With the right match it shouldn't be possible to tighten it fully with the bit off center. It may be the bit itself is bent slightly... try rolling it by itself on a hard flat surface to check if it is true. It should roll evenly without any wiggle or bumping.


1

You've got a local makers DIY shop, so that is probably your best bet. If it's current membership don't focus on crafts, just ask the leadership if you can start a craft night. Volunteer to teach people how to make that walnut jewelry box during the first meeting. Then at the end of the meeting, ask for other presenters to teach on other craft subjects. ...


1

In the original author's case, the cause turned out to be what was intended by the manufacturer to be a wobble reducer. The tool's collet sleeve contained a stepped area to center the end of the bit shaft, and the shaft was catching on that, forcing it to an angle (the accepted self-answer). Many rotary tools don't have that stepped area. There is another ...


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