4

You can definitely mix the quartz waste with epoxy. In fact, it can be mostly waste, with just enough epoxy to bind it together. Mix thoroughly so all of the quartz is covered with epoxy and there aren't pockets of quartz powder. It's also helpful to press the mixture into shape to force it together and eliminate tiny gaps and air pockets (you want a ...


3

It's hard to diagnose without seeing the bit you used, but here are my ideas: Orientation The line in the center of your image has only one chipped edge on one side. That implies that the problem either arises at the side where the tool starts touching the glass or leaves the glass. If you turn the glass (or the tool) so that the rotation of the bit is ...


2

Most common would be a rotary bit. This one would be specifically for glass carving: Amazon link The bottom row would be the fine detail tips, would be beneficial to wanting to carve out small detail. Brand wise, you really can't go wrong with a rotary bit. I have been in the tool industry for about five years. Yes, you can get really high quality rotary ...


1

You can try the windshield repair resin to hold the loose chip. Citrine is a form of quartz, which is the primary component of normal glass, so a resin designed to match the refractive index of windshield glass might not be visible. I don't think it will work for an internal crack in a gemstone, though. The resin won't seep into the crack under normal ...


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