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15

There are a few different ways to do this, but most of them involve extremes of temperature: first intense heat along the line where you want to cut the bottle, and then submerging in cold water, repeated several times if necessary. A Song of Water and Fire This method assumes you have a tool with which to score the glass, for instance a glass drill bit or ...


14

There usually two different kinds of glue you commonly find. One will come off if you just soak the label under water over night. Doesn't have to be soapy. It helps to score the surface of the label with a cross hatching with a razor. Some labels are waterproof. You need the water to get through to the glue. The other kind of glue will come off with VM&...


13

We make beer. We occasionally make labels for that beer. The easiest, best cheapest way to attach the labels is... ready for this... you sure??? Milk. Don't know why, don't ask why. It works. You won't be able to wash the bottles without the label coming off but if you're brewing, by the time you're washing the bottle, you probably want the label to ...


11

I think I can help you. To make a living, I carve glass. Tabletops, door fronts, serving platters, and almost anything else made of glass has seen my efforts. By far the best tool to use would be a Dremel type rotary tool with either a diamond burr or a stone grinding bit. These come in quite a variety of shapes, compound materials and grit levels and ...


11

There are certainly several methods to be found online however most of them can have mixed results where you edges are concerned. This can be done rather well with a scoring jig, regular glass cutter and water. Depending on how often you are going to be doing this will influence the tools and jig. Scoring Cutting glass, so that it breaks predictably, can ...


9

This can be done, but the difference can have more to do with the type of glass than the method. From personal experience, tempered glass is inherently stressed and is almost impossible to work with. Areas towards the necks of bottles have similar issues. I suggest fresh masonry bits for their cost effectivenss. Too slow can cause stress from the pressure ...


9

There are 2 kinds of glue used in bottles (as far as I'm aware): Water based glue; Oil based glue; To remove For water based Leave the bottle soaking overnight and scrub it next day. For oil based As oil is more expensive than water and soaking in oil would take up a lot of it, I just put oil in my hands and spread the oil on the label. Make sure the ...


8

A very simple approach are Window Colour types of paint (example). They basically produce removable decals. You can either work directly on the glass or - if bottle design and pattern permit - work comfortably on a flat surface, then transfer it to the bottle. (Or combine both and connect pre-made parts on the bottle with fresh paint.) Lines / contours ...


7

There is yet another, more elegant solution, requiring no cutting tools. Safety goggles or glasses. Protect your eyes. Gather the following materials: Large metal bowl (common kitchen bowl) Glass to Cut Cooking oil piece of iron, to be held by tongs or pliers. Lighter, torch, or gas stove top Fill the glass container up to the place that you want it cut. ...


7

Always wear safety glasses! (It's a good idea with any drilling, but especially when drilling through glass.) There are specialty bits made for drilling through glass that can be found at most hardware stores. A standard drill will work fine. Don't use a hammer drill! Keep your drill speed low (if it is variable) especially if you wind up using a diamond ...


6

Steam distillation is used to convert catnip leaves to concentrated catnip oil. There is an Instructable that I've followed in the past to make what they call kitty crack. It's relatively simple, at least the distillation portion. The leaves are placed in a container on a heat source and water is added. The collection is boiled and the vapor containing ...


6

There is a pretty big ‘cabochon’ crafts movement that sounds a lot like what you are talking about: Flattened glass bead + acrylic emulsion glue + laser print + backing. The first video I Found on YouTube advised Modge-Podge Dimensional Glue, but I have no experience with the product, and would recommend an acrylic gloss medium, which will dry clear. DO NOT ...


5

For labels not affected by the dishwasher I found that WD-40 removes most glues, and it has the advantage that it is easily absorbed by paper labels so just spraying it on the label and waiting is usually enough. Plastic labels are easier to peel off, a cloth or paper towel with WD-40 is usually enough to clean the remaining glue


5

Epoxies are the essential answer to your question. Since you are affixing two materials that can expand or contract quote a bit, you need to choose an epoxy that will not shrink and risk cracking the glass. The wood should be ok. From here, the answer would turn into a bevy of brand recommendations. I think you should look for what is available to you, ...


5

If you have particularly tough to remove labels, I have found Goo Gone to be very effective. Apply a bit to the label and let it sit for a couple of minutes. The label should come off really easily. Apply a little more to a paper towel and rub off the remaining adhesive left on the bottle. Then wash with hot water and soap. Goo Gone isn't very expensive and ...


5

There are specialised chemical sprays, available reasonably cheaply, for doing exactly this: I've always used the Maplins one. It comes in an aerosol spray bottle and with a long thin tube to attach to the aerosol so as to direct the spray very precisely if required. I've found it fast and effective at removing labels from not only glass but also plastic ...


5

Method for effortless removing labels and glue: Fill the bottle with boiling water and wait a few minutes. High temperature should weaken the adhesive, so the labels can be peeled in one piece. Use a kitchen funnel and baking glove to avoid hand burns. The adhesive will remain on the bottle. To wash it of use kitchen steel wool and ordinary vegetable ...


5

Glass has a melting temperature of around 1400-1600°C (see here ), and most household ovens top out at around 200-250°C so no, you cannot melt glass in a normal home oven.


5

You would use a hand held diamond file. They are sold specifically for the purpose you are describing (fixing chipped articles). There are a number of articles and videos online which detail the process and specify which files to use (flat, rounded, etc.).


5

Yes, The general term is 'bottle slumping'. There are several images on pinterest. The glass is heated to the point that it can be shaped. Current trends are to use a Kiln, with temperatures between 500F and 1500F I have memories from local carnivals in the 1960s and 1970 of the bottles being heated in a liquid, shaped and given as prizes or sold. I had ...


5

For drilling glass, drill bits for tiles (the spear-point type) work. Work wet and go slowly. I've seen them down to 3mm. You need to hold the glass steady, but a cordless drill will be adequate. If you want a smooth (as opposed to facetted) piece, jewellers rouge on a cloth will polish glass, worked by hand, though it might take a while. For a little ...


4

I homebrew, so on occasion end up removing labels from previously-enjoyed beer bottles before reusing for bottling my own beer. I've found that soaking overnight in a water solution of sodium percarbonate releases the majority of labels/glues. A couple of scoops (each about a cup) in a 5 gallon bucket of water seems to be a good dilution. Sodium ...


4

Ours is the low-tech, slow method. An overnight soak in soapy water (start it out hot) usually helps the glue release pretty nicely and softens the paper so that it's easy to scrape. If the first soak doesn't do the job a second shorter soak without the paper usually will. We use the plastic scraper (from our juicer) to scrape the surface of the bottles. ...


4

Vinegar I had never found just water alone to work. I usually felt the need to remove most of the label before I recycled it. But now I have tried vinegar to much success. Here is the bottle I tested with before: Since it has not been mentioned, I thought I would go into a little detail by doing an experiment. After removing what I could of the label and ...


4

A tile cutter with a diamond blade works to smooth the edges of glass. I bought one at a garage sale to cut slate tiles and found it also works to finish glass edges. Mine has a way to tilt the blade also. I first lightly run the glass edges at a 90 degree angle against the diamond saw blade, IE, with the blade straight up and down. Next I tilt the blade ...


4

This is most likely an applied ceramic label. It's an industrial process that can't be achieved in a typical handmade craft setting (e.g., your garage), requiring ceramic inks or enamels, screen printing to apply the design, and high-temperature baking to set. If you're considering removing an ACL to decorate the beer glass differently, the verdict is ...


4

Another option would be to do two pours. This would be what I would have tried/suggested with epoxy resin. Make the first pour and let it harden. Do your best to try and remove bubbles during both pours obviously. You don't want to pour to fill half but slightly less then that so your object appear suspended in the middle of the finished piece. This will be ...


4

The amount of heat generated by an incandescent light bulb in an enclosure is not particularly great relative to many adhesive types. One can purchase a silicone product known as high temperature RTV (room temperature vulcanizing) which can tolerate temperatures sufficiently high to ignite paper. It's not particularly suited to your project, however, as it ...


4

Soft pastel is literally the most difficult "painterly" media to protect. Generally speaking, the appropriate way to protect pastels is with a so-called shadow box, where the paper or board is floated above the backing plate of the frame and still has air-space to the glass. (See my drawing below.) This is a pretty material-intensive method, but it serves ...


4

Glassine is used for protecting drawings, prints, etc while shipping or storing them, and not for displaying them. The proper way to permanently frame and display your artwork would be the one suggested by @Nothingismagick. The cheaper alternative to glass that I know of is Plexiglass. Glass vs. Plexiglass Framing


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