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6

The dye you have linked to is known as Blue 1, or Brilliant Blue FCF, and is, unlike my comments under the question, a synthetic dye. It is a dye that can be consumed by humans. It is not defined as a redox dye (indicator), so should not react to changes in pH, but it is derived from Methylene blue which does change colour from blue to clear in it's reduced ...


6

While more historical artists likely didn't understand the chemical processes behind the behaviors of the two options, the biggest reason is permanence. Dyes are organic substances that are either soluble in their medium or in their application. This means the structure of it breaks down as part of the application. The structural breakdown, coupled with the ...


4

Bleaching works "as expected" for natural plant fibers (e.g. cotton). Polyester is actually a plastic, and bleaching will not have the same effect. I expect one (some?) of the following: no change; some fading, potentially not uniform; (partial) destruction of the shirt, as a result of the bleach attacking the plastics. Even worse, if there is anything ...


3

Most of the resources that I reviewed agree that the amount of soda ash used for home dyeing is safe to pour down the drain. However, I agree that it is important to take extra precautions with a septic system. So I checked the Dharma Trading Co. website (a great resource with lots of detailed info about dyeing fabric and fiber), One environmental ...


2

Well, yes you can... lots of people dip dye pumpkins using food coloring, though the outer skin of the pumpkin will not absorb the dyes as well as the flesh of the pumpkin. If you want to enhance the dye absorption on the surface, a very light sanding with a fine-grained sandpaper to lightly score the surface will probably help there. As you have the small ...


2

If you put clear tape on frosted glass it becomes see-through. You could try that if it's meant to be a momentary peek-though situation. Or you could mostly frost it with white alcohol ink. Just leaving enough of an open lattice to achieve a veiled appearance. I'd think a decent way to accomplish that would be to put on some gloves, wad up a small piece ...


2

It is hard to guess what went wrong in the dying process, but I am assuming you have a natural jute fiber burlap. You will probably have to dye the fabric again. What usually works is Rit - which you can get at pretty much a y fabric store. Be careful, it is a little caustic and will stain your skin. If you want to try to fix the dye, don’t use salt or ...


2

I discovered that by simply cutting the stems and adding black dye to the vase and simply placing the roses in the vase will color them black. I tried this and it works great. You can dye the flowers by placing the stems in dye-enhanced water


1

Get 2 clear plastic bowls that are the same size and some clear bathtub silicon in a tube. Glue one bowl in the eyeball, this is the iris - paint it so it looks good, glue the other bowl upside down onto it. When the silicon has dried, cut away the excess with a really sharp knife.


1

As I understand it, dyes work via chemical reactions with the materials around them--the type of carrier liquid, chemicals within that carrier liquid, the material that they are being applied to, the atmosphere, etc. That means that it is much more difficult to ensure that you can get the same color from one day to another with dyes. You mention indigo--...


1

Most artists used the best materials for the job they could afford. While dyes were often cheaper, you would often know that they would lose colour in the next few years, while pigments were often known to hold colour for a long time. But all painters were limited to what they could get and could afford so some would have gone with dyes and their faded ...


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