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3

This is what I would do: Take the thread and whip stitch the holes so they do not fray any further. Since it is knit textile, tighten and loosen to manipulate the hole in a fun or fashionable shape. Place the patches on the inside of the garment, temporarily secure with safety pins, straight pins or basting stitch. Use an interesting embroidery stitch to ...


6

Cutting into the existing armhole will most likely end badly, because you need a lot more fabric to secure those darts than is available at the arm hole. If you want to make the hole smaller, you have to sew more material to it. I hope you didn't throw the sleeves away yet, because that is the perfect material for your endeavor. You didn't post a picture or ...


0

From what I read in your question, since both sides are the same fabric, “cut both pieces the same and have the seam at the fold”. It might be easier and will look solid once pressed. Tip: prewash the fabric it can shrink. And it will be easy to wash in the future. Also, Folding the fabric in half makes sewing easier (like making a pillowcase) or sewing ...


0

Another alternative is to intentionally make the outer fabric more visible on the inside. Normally the inside (fancy) fabric would be folded over and slightly larger than the lining fabric, so the edges are the nice fabric, the lining is smaller, and the seam on the lining side away from the fold. This is the way to go for most lined pieces of clothing. ...


2

If you will mostly view the curtain from one side, handle that as the 'side you look at in normal curtains', do have that side a bit bigger and fold the edges over to seem them. On the other hand, if you will see the whole of the curtain from both sides and you will want both to look nice, two pieces of fabric the same size, put the good side on the good ...


6

There are many ways to make ruffles, but some of them are out of fashion now. Ruffles went through several hundred years of development and changing fashion, and sometimes went by different names, depending on the construction method and where they were attached to the garment. The most common ruffle (today) is a long strip of fabric that is gathered along ...


3

That might depend a bit on your definition, but generally I’d say no: For sewing there are a few common ways to make ruffles: The probably first method would be to make a basting stich, pull on the thread and create ruffles by gathering the fabric. A very related version is to lay a length of very sturdy string (think floss or fishing line) on the fabric ...


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