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1

Plaster Plaster should be close to ideal for this application. Before you give up on it, here are a few considerations and ideas. Even at a thickness of 1/4" or 3/8", plaster should be strong enough not to easily break up. Check these possibilities that may be the cause: Not using a good ratio of water to plaster (especially too much water or ...


1

I've created numerous paintings with rough sketch on the first layer of canvas. I would imagine it would depend on the roughness of the canvas. I have not personally tried to do a final piece on a piece of canvas with just pencil or charcoal. Only light outlines. Prime canvas would be even more difficult to achieve because it gives a waxy layer on top of the ...


2

If you have cement walls and you're trying to protect the doorknob, I'd look at EVA foam, which you could paint to match the wall (although it wouldn't be invisible). If what you are trying to protect is the wall (drywall), there are various resilient wall protectors you can buy or make, but I've yet to find a really satisfactory solution via putting ...


0

How about a strip of wood veneer? It's easy to paint and to adhere to the wall. It's also cheap, and you might even be able to get leftovers from your local hardware store. For extra resilience you can opt for a layer of rubber or foam sandwiched between the strip and the wall.


7

It depends on what you want to draw, and in what style. Working with charcoal on canvas will really emphasize the texture of the canvas, creating a rough impression. It will be hard to draw details - in relation to the size, that is: you can still draw details but they'll have to be larger or implied rather than drawn carefully. Coincidentally I've recently ...


3

You could also 3D print spheres in different colors (representing different atoms) with regular cutouts that serve as sockets for connetors. One example is this honeycomb sphere: If you print fitting hexagonal collums, you can connect several spheres. Technically it won't allow any orientation, but I think it's close enough to be practical. One aspect you ...


5

Toothpicks and Styrofoam Spheres. Use the toothpicks to both symbolize the bonds and hold the spheres in appropriate alignment with each other. Since you want the spheres to touch, use slightly larger styrofoam spheres so that a half a toothpick can be hidden inside each conjoined spheres. (...or break your toothpicks in half).


3

Velcro-covered spheres Since children's games making use of Velcro balls can be found in many toy stores, a cheap option would be to start with buying a few of these balls (e.g.), find some additional self-adhesive Velcro straps or tape, and attach the side with the opposite functionality (hook or loop) to the balls. This will allow for a lot of ...


1

One option is to use Sugru which is a mouldable glue and heat resistant to 180C (356F). From wikipedia: Sugru (/ˈsuːɡruː/), also known as Formerol, is a patented multi-purpose, non-slumping brand of silicone rubber that resembles modelling clay. It is available in several colours and upon exposure to air, cures to a rubber-like texture. https://www.amazon.co....


1

Seeing your examples, I've got another idea. There is an air-dry clay called "cold porcelain" because the finished material looks somewhat like porcelain but it doesn't have to be fired in a kiln. It's very hard and can withstand a lot of force (if it's thick enough). Some recipes are rock solid, others are slightly bendable. An honest warning: ...


1

There are endless materials you could potentially use. I'll assume you want to make both stands out of the same material (correct me if I'm wrong). The $20 limit eliminates a few moldable materials. There are a number of different basic approaches you can use. If you want a sleek design with thin walls, like the laptop stand in your link, that won't be ...


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Probably the most available materials are cardboard and paper. Cardboard is easy to cut into shapes like a laptop stand. If you want maximum stability, cut cross-sections of the stand out of many sheets of cardboard and glue all the sheets together to make a solid stand. You could also shred the cardboard or paper and mix it with 50/50 water and white glue ...


3

Two non-flammable solid options to make a holder/base yourself are: Aluminium (which might need different tools but is in some ways easier to work than wood). I'd probably use two plates joined with screws, drilling appropriately-sized holes in the top one to leave pockets for the candles Plaster. I'd make a wooden box, fill it with plaster of paris and ...


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