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I will preface my response with a cautionary warning that I am an engineer by profession, so I am somewhat naturally inclined to use optics/physics and math to illustrate my point. Hopefully I'm enough of an artist to actually be able to illustrate this sufficiently well. Now, onwards! A person's field of vision can be described as the "cone" ...


4

One or two vanishing points are placed on the horizon. If you're drawing with 3 vanishing points, the third will be above or below the horizon. Just like the position of the horizon, the vanishing point(s) depend(s) on the perspective, and at what angle you are viewing the object you are drawing. In case of the one-point perspective, the upper and lower ...


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The station point is the distance at which you are looking at an object, (i.e. how far you are from it). The horizon line is where your eyes are, (i.e. if are you looking the object from below, above or the front). There are no guidelines to where to place these, you can look at an object from whatever angle or distance you wish. But changing your position ...


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In the following explanation I had to make some assumptions: Room is 10 x 10 x 10 I had to assume a distance (station point) for the observer a fixed distance from the object. Need to know how far the observer is from the object being viewed. You are looking for a one point perspective solution for where to place the back wall. This is modified from the ...


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The vanishing point, provided the parallel lines are on the ground plane, is on the horizon and it will always be eye-level . The horizon can be looked at as the sum of all of the vanishing points. For someone standing at 5'7" the horizon is 2.9 miles away from the viewer. I think it is possible the curve you see above is because the ground is not flat (...


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Your model is quite clear, although the question is less so. You ask if increasing the height of the image in the background to 200% is the best way. The best way for what purpose? If your objective is to maintain an approximation of the original image, the number would not be 200%. Consider that the red line extends below the forward lip of the ...


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You are assuming that most paintings use this certain perspective, which is not the case. A subset of paintings do and those are landscape paintings which all of your examples consist of. This style typically uses two point perspective with the horizon parallel to the top and bottom of the frame. This could be considered landscape perspective. The common ...


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I don't know any formal artistic composition rules but how I would handle it is by mocking it up with either Adobe Photoshop or Gimp Photo Editing Software. (Gimp is free). Put the background in one layer and the dog in another, then scale and move each until it looks good to you. Then, just for fun... I apply an oil or watercolor filter to see what the ...


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I am no expert, but a simple Google search gave me a very clear answer. The cone of vision is the spatial volume seen by a (dimensionless) observer inside an angle of 60o. To "calculate" the envelope (margin) of the cone, you "draw" all the lines originating at the observer and being at an angle of 30o away from the line of sight. Everything outside this ...


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There are, arguably, three distinct viewpoints in linear perspective, all having to do with the viewing angle in relation to the ground plane: J.T. Thibault, "Application of Linear Perspective in the Graphic Arts" (c.1860), via handprint.com All three are symbolized by the figure on the left, taking on three different positions in every picture. These ...


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This is an old question and kind of a unique situation. But if anyone else wanted to try this, the existing discussion doesn't really address what's required. This is a perspective problem. Your field of view is like a cone. The farther the distance, the more you see both horizontally and vertically, and the smaller items appear. The item up close ...


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