11

Print on regular white paper. Adhere the print to the black paper with rubber cement or temporary adhesive. Do the cutting, and scoring if needed (light scoring can also be used to mark glue edges and similar feature lines). When you're ready to assemble, peel off the white paper.


8

Printer ink is very hard - if not impossible - to see on black paper, because the ink soaks into the paper. Laser printer toner creates a very thin layer of molten plastic on top of the paper, so you might be able to see a yellow line on the black paper if you print it with a laser printer. (Unless you have a specialized printer with white toner, "white&...


6

My bachelor's degree was in Fine Arts, with a focus on wood block printing. The technique I was taught involved marking the center line on the back of the leading edge of the paper. (The end that will feed into the press first.) On the press, lay out a registration paper that clearly marks the location of the block, a corresponding center line, and one or ...


5

The provenance that a certificate adds, when combined with a bill or contract of sale, is more than just proof that you did it. It is also proof that the holder has a legitimate claim to a legitimate artwork. (Kind of like the idea behind a bearer bond.) This can be useful for insurance claims or for reselling a work. They can also be used as a means to ...


5

The toner transfer method of transferring an image onto a PCB should also work on wood. Basically you laser print (a mirror image if you need to work from the front) on suitable paper (I've done this with inkjet glossy photo paper), then iron onto the material, and you get a nice clean black image. You're limited by the size of the print you can make, or ...


5

Have you considered using a high-gloss clear spray paint? And I would suspect that gloss = plastic to some degree, and an inkjet printer basically sets down ink droplets. If you print on glossy paper that's not specifically designed for inkjet printers, you might end up with a smear of ink. So I'd suggest do printing first, then if you use spray paint you ...


5

Chris H's comment is the answer in a nutshell: the description should include the medium, and depends on the type of printing. If it's an inkjet print, you can state that; if it's a laser print, the artwork's description could say so. You can also just say 'digital print', combining all digital printing possibilities. Often the type of paper - if ...


5

Generally you can print with white ink in many inkjet printers. However, there are some very important notes. Not all printers will work well when this is done. In many cases this is due to the manufacturing of the ink itself. Epson actually makes white ink for some select high-end printers. White will typically be a pigment-based ink rather than a dye-...


4

If the have a computer drawing program such as Photoshop, gimp or Inkscape you could use those programs layering ability to simulate the different cut and colour "layers" you are looking to achieve. Each layer would correspond to a cut and color. Different pen tools could also be used to simulate different cutting tools. And the zoom feature would allow ...


4

Your question is somewhat broad-ranging and is usually discouraged on Stack Exchange forums. Your last question certainly fits that bill. Those answers can be found by searching for reviews of possible candidate printers within your budget. More specifically, you would be seeking a printer with a relatively flat paper path, to prevent jams caused by thicker ...


4

After about a week of scouring the web I found a forum that mentions using an HP Photosmart Pro B9180. This is a semi-pro printer. It has an option for a straight paper path and can print on items up to 1.5mm thick which is enough for my 42pt paperboard media stock. It is no longer made so you have to go to the used market. Refurbished units seem to be ...


4

I'll go with a completely different idea. Use a laser cutter, or vinyl or paper cutter to do your work. You already have a PDF, so you should be able to open it in a variety of software to send it to one of these machines. I use a laser cutter to cut a lot of things, from acrylic sheets to leather and paper. It can leave very little residue when cutting ...


3

There is iron-on transfer paper that will work in an inkjet printer, but I took a quick look at the instructions and it actually takes quite a lot of ironing to attach it, and I would be concerned about potential heat damage to the underlying box. A better solution might be to use some sort of transfer process to print on your fabric, and then use a ...


3

You could use self adhesive clear pockets and print the labels to place inside. Available in a range of sizes from A6 to A3 depending on your needs. They are made from durable PVC, you just peel off the protective paper and apply. Self adhesive CD pockets may also work although not as durable as the pvc.


3

From Wikipedia's article on Japanese woodblock printing: The text or image was first drawn onto thin washi(Japanese paper), then glued face-down onto a plank of close-grained wood, usually cherry. Absolutely not suitable are open-grained species like oak or ash.


3

I looked into this years ago when I was printing out some books to test my leather binding skills. Back then you likely would have used dedicated software to perform this function. Software has changed since then and Adobe Reader DC does this as well as InDesign from what I gather. Depending on your Acrobat version it should be able to do this well. In ...


3

- Method 1 - The fastest and smartest way is, set color as RGB(0,0,1). But if you want to print white color permanetly and want to white color following method 2 - Method 2 - You will not get anything on the paper with a basic CMYK inkjet or laser printer. The CMYK color mixing is subtractive, meaning that it requires the base that is being colored to ...


3

There is white Trace-it transfer paper from a company called ScratchArt[1]. This would require you to print out your image first then trace over image to make the actual image transfer. Similar to the idea of carbon paper instead in this case the paper is coated on one side with lose layer of white ink bound with wax. The image is transferred by placing the ...


3

Another alternative would be to use a home vinyl cutter such as the Silhouette, the Circuit or the Scan-N-Cut to cut out your template on decent quality paper. I use a silhouette to cut stencils all the time and as long as I use decent quality 40lb paper, the cuts are clean and precise. Regular card stock tends to get fuzzy in the corners making the ...


3

You've not provided much in the way of your available equipment and skills, and the task you've set for yourself has substantial supporting requirements. A book press is top of the list. You can build your own, with appropriate research, tools and materials, or you can purchase one to fit your needs. A book press is used to compress paper pages, but can ...


3

Weight. Like a flower press. You could put the paper you want to emboss between books with the motif or design touching the paper. You could use wood to protect the books.


3

You should not handle toner powder at all without a high quality filter mask and potentially safety glasses. Loose toner is a health risk for the respiratory system due to it's particle size. It's not toxic, but some studies compare it's effects to the fine dust of diesel exhaust or even asbestos. You should at least expect an irritation or even inflammation ...


3

The art form is called photocopy art, copier art, xerox art or sometimes just xerography with copier art being the most common. It was an experimental art form that originated with artists putting objects on the copy bed and using the copy process to generate the work of art, often manipulating and then recopying multiple times to get the final piece. That ...


3

You have another answer that is 90% there. You need a black ink cartridge, empty it (print if possible), then fill it with white ink. Most new printers read the codes on the cartridges so you need the black one so that your printer doesn't need 20 drivers and hours of troubleshooting. (I am being very generic here and this will work great for 95% of ...


3

You can either scan the boxes with a high DPI setting, or take photographs of them with a semi-professional camera. In both cases you'll end up with a high-definition digital reproduction. You might have to perform some post-processing in software like Photoshop to properly isolate (crop and adjust the perspective of) the cover, adjust the white balance and/...


3

Depends on the type of paint on the walls and the type of adhesive on the decals. In general, with normal PVA the sticker is going to end up damaging the paint either by bonding tightly and peeling it from the wall when you remove the sticker, or reacting with the paint and discolouring it over time. Some types of high gloss enamels fare better, but in ...


3

Stuff that works directly with a laser printer will have the kinds of problems described in Gwyn's answer. If you have access to an inkjet printer, you will be in business. There are clear, printable vinyl sheets that stick to a wall or window with static electricity. The media will melt in a laser printer, but they're coated to accept inkjet printing. ...


3

As far as I'm aware (I'm not a professional artist) the artist should strive to make each print of a series as equal to all other prints as possible. However, if the artist intentionally introduces non-reproduceable variations in how the paper is printed or alters the print by hand, it can be considered a "Varied Edition", "Variable Edition&...


3

I think what is important in the nomenclature of the edition is the intention of the artist, meaning that potential inconsistencies have no bearing on the artistic intention. Irregularities that have a significant impact on different prints are usually eliminated during the print proof phase - if they're not, they become part of the artistic intention, after ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible