We changed our privacy policy. Read more.

Hot answers tagged

7

Unlike natural fibers which can be blocked by simply shaping the item while wet, blocking acrylic requires heat. Many people try to wet-block acrylic the same way they would do wool, and they aren't happy with the results so they conclude (incorrectly) that there's no point in blocking acrylic. That's not true. There's simply very little point in wet ...


6

Evenly spaced stitches means that the number of stitches between increases is approximately the same. Since you are increase 50 sts over 94 current stitches, and 94/50=1.88 you should put (on average) 1.88 sts between increases. That means your increases will be done in some combination of (m1,k1) and (m1,k2) repeats. There are helpful calculators available ...


4

You can also use your feet instead of the two-chairs solution (my chair backs have an unsuitable shape, the unfolded hank tends to slip). Just sit on the couch, with your feet up (no shoes, obviously, and naked feet work best in my opinion), and put the unwrapped hank around both feet. Lean feet apart to tension slightly (prevent tangling); lean body forward ...


3

Weaving yarns are described by two numbers separated by a slash, eg 2/5, 3/10, etc. The smaller number is the number of plies The larger number represents the size of each ply. So, a 2/5 yarn has 2 strands of size 5 thread. A 3/10 yarn has 3 strands of size 10 thread. Different sources are inconsistent about which number comes first. Usually the smaller ...


3

I have tried several methods found online. Stitching through the pompom works. Use waxed thread/string and a triple knot to tie tightly. Tie the wool to attach to a hat or gold ribbon for Xmas pompoms round as well and the waxed thread doesn't show. Then tie round the pompom at right angles to the first one also with the waxed thread and triple knot in this ...


3

First of all, even when you can split the yarn, it will be easier to buy thinner yarn or use the yarn you have in alternate turns, mixing the colours by using them next to each other. You also control the use of colours better that way. To test whether the yarn can be split at all, take a short length and take it apart. If the different parts split off ...


2

I googled 'fork made pompom' and now understand better what you are asking about. This is the random site I used, (as I prefer still pictures over videos.) I have no connection to this site. There are four options for mistakes I see: Not enough windings for the size of your yarn compared to your fork. Not pulled together enough when tying the middle. Too ...


2

I haven't done a ton of blocking, but since I can't wear wool I've done mostly acrylic when I do have something to block. It's true that you may not need to block it, but that's not a general rule for all scarves. If the corners are curling or there are slight width changes along the length, I would try to block that smooth. The pattern may also say ...


2

I hope you were able to find a good solution! I know that with the kind of skeins that Matt linked, you'll almost always get a frustrating (and huge) amount of yarn barf. Once I had nearly half a skein of it because the center-pull line got tucked into a weird place! Anyway, I've found that a good solution, if you don't have a yarn winder and don't intend ...


1

This is extremely old... But I came here trying to find the same answer (it's one of the first results in Google). So I figured I'd post for anyone else. This answers the second question: preventing the making of a pet fur garment in the first place. So someone mentioned buying containers with holes in them for storing the yarn (to prevent hair from getting ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible